Posts filtered by tags: Literature[x]


 

Behold the Anciente Mappe of Fairyland, a Fantastical 1917 Mashup of Tales from Homer’s Odyssey, King Arthur, the Brothers Grimm & More

For most of publishing history, books for children meant primers and preachy religious texts, not mythical worlds invented just for kids. It’s true that fairy tales may have been specifically targeted to the young, but they were never childish. (See the original Grimms' tales.) By the 19th century, however, the situation had dramatically changed. And by the turn of the century, childlike fairy stories and fantasies enjoyed wide popularity among grown-ups and children alike, just as they do toda...
Tags: Google, Art, England, Congress, College, France, Literature, Peter Pan, Brothers Grimm, Belle, Robert Louis Stevenson, Tolkien, Ucla, Pan, Peter, Bernard Sleigh


Virginia Woolf & Friends Name Their Favorite and Least Favorite Writers in a Newly Unearthed 1923 Survey

Celebrity Twitter can be fun… sometimes…. Tabloids still have mass appeal, albeit mainly on the web. But for those who want to see the introverted and bookish caught off-guard and off the cuff, times are a little tough. Writers can more easily control their image than actors or pop stars, naturally. Most aren’t nearly as recognizable and subject to constant pop culture surveillance. Literary scandals rarely go beyond plagiarism or politics. Sometimes one might wish—as in the days of mean drunks...
Tags: Google, College, Virginia, West, Literature, Vox, James Joyce, Henry James, Kennedy, Virginia Woolf, Thompson, Marcel Proust, Facebook Twitter, Virgil, Joyce, Dostoevsky


10 novels that brilliantly capture the American experience

Literature expands our ability to feel empathy and inspires compassion.These 10 novels tackle some facet of the American experience. The list includes a fictional retelling of the first Native American to graduate from Harvard, and hiding out in inner-city Newark.We call it "getting lost" in a novel, but what we find there is often more impactful than any nonfiction work can offer. Literature makes us more empathic and intelligent. Storytelling is how we bond, as tribes and a planet. A powerful...
Tags: Books, New York, Arts, Entertainment, New York City, America, History, Empathy, Harvard, Culture, United States, Innovation, Literature, Philip Roth, Newark, Seattle


The Lou Reed Archive Opens at the New York Public Library: Get Your Own Lou Reed Library Card and Check It Out

This past October marked the fifth anniversary of Lou Reed’s death. This month marks what would have been his 77th birthday. It seems like as good a time as any to revisit his legacy. As of this past Friday, anyone can do exactly that in person at the New York Public Library. And they can do so with their own special edition NYPL Lou Reed library card. The NYPL has just opened to the public the Lou Reed Archive, “approximately 300 linear feet,” the library writes in a press release, “of paper r...
Tags: Google, Music, New York, College, Edgar Allan Poe, Brooklyn, Nypl, Literature, Andy Warhol, Ornette Coleman, Lincoln Center, Archives, Lou Reed, New York Public Library, Laurie Anderson, Reed


When William Faulkner Set the World Record for Writing the Longest Sentence in Literature: Read the 1,288-Word Sentence from Absalom, Absalom!

Image by Carl Van Vechten, via Wikimedia Commons “How did Faulkner pull it off?” is a question many a fledgling writer has asked themselves while struggling through a period of apprenticeship like that novelist John Barth describes in his 1999 talk "My Faulkner." Barth “reorchestrated” his literary heroes, he says, “in search of my writerly self... downloading my innumerable predecessors as only an insatiable green apprentice can.” Surely a great many writers can relate when Barth says, “it was...
Tags: Google, Europe, Books, Maryland, Writing, College, Washington, Literature, Guinness Book of World Records, Lincoln, Sherman, Jonathan Coe, Jones, William Styron, Facebook Twitter, Beckett


When William Faulkner Set the World Record for Writing the Longest Sentence in Literature: 1,288 Words from Absalom, Absalom!

Image by Carl Van Vechten, via Wikimedia Commons “How did Faulkner pull it off?” is a question many a fledgling writer has asked themselves while struggling through a period of apprenticeship like that novelist John Barth describes in his 1999 talk "My Faulkner." Barth “reorchestrated” his literary heroes, he says, “in search of my writerly self... downloading my innumerable predecessors as only an insatiable green apprentice can.” Surely a great many writers can relate when Barth says, “it was...
Tags: Google, Europe, Books, Maryland, Writing, College, Washington, Literature, Guinness Book of World Records, Lincoln, Sherman, Jonathan Coe, Jones, William Styron, Facebook Twitter, Beckett


Jack Kerouac’s “Beat Paintings:” Now Gathered in One Book and Exhibition for the First Time

Most of us enter Jack Kerouac's world through his 1959 novel On the Road. Those of us who explore it more deeply thereafter may find much more than we expected to: Kerouac's inner life came out not just in his formidable body of written work, but in spoken-word jazz albums, fantasy baseball materials, and even paintings. Though Kerouac has now been gone for nearly half a century, it wasn't until just last year that his works of visual art were brought together: Kerouac: Beat Painting did it in ...
Tags: Google, Art, Milan, College, Literature, Road, Jack Kerouac, Kerouac, Seoul, Truman Capote, First Time, Facebook Twitter, Bandera, Colin Marshall, David Barnett, Pope Paul VI


Steal from your heroes: John Cleese on Big Think Edge

John Cleese teaches a video lesson for Big Think Edge called "Make Your Mark with Humor".The Monty Python alumni and comedy legend has some unexpected advice to get your creativity out of your mind and onto the page. Subscribe to Big Think Edge before we launch on March 30 to get 20% off monthly and annual memberships. None Who better to show you the ropes of comedy than Monty Python alumni John Cleese? Humor is valuable in its own right. It's also a perfect tool for connecting with others and c...
Tags: Art, Comedy, Writing, John Cleese, Hack, Creativity, Innovation, Literature, Monty Python, Personal Growth, John CleeseRetire


Why Should We Read Sylvia Plath? An Animated Video Makes the Case

In “Morning Song,” from Sylvia Plath’s posthumous 1965 collection Ariel, published two years after her suicide, a newborn infant is a “fat gold watch.” Among the incessant lists of adjectives in both her work, “fat” is one that stands out, appearing often, in several synonyms, as a celebration of abundance and real anxiety over weight gain and a general too-muchness. In the same poem, the baby is a work of art, a “new statue.” Its mother, on the other hand, is in one stanza a cloud effac...
Tags: Google, UK, London, College, Poetry, Literature, Time Magazine, Ariel, Sylvia Plath, Ted Hughes, Robert Lowell, Facebook Twitter, Hughes, Durham NC, Josh Jones, Plath


The Amazing Franz Kafka Workout!: Discover the 15-Minute Exercise Routine That Swept the World in 1904

Does your spare tire show no signs of deflating as bikini season looms? Is the fear of bullies kicking sand in your face beginning to outstrip the horror of transforming into a giant bug overnight? Do you long to experience lasting health benefits along with an impressively fit appearance? Friends, we make you this promise: The Amazing Franz Kafka Workout will transform your life along with your physique in just 15 minutes a day. That's right, just 15 minutes of daily calisthenics (and some ...
Tags: Health, Google, College, New York City, Sports, Literature, Kafka, Facebook Twitter, Müller, Walt Whitman, Franz Kafka, Sarah Wildman, Ayun Halliday, Unearthed Health Manual, Jørgen Peter Müller, Franz Kafka Workout


Here’s John Steinbeck Asking Marilyn Monroe for Her Autograph (1955)

When asking a celebrity for a special favor, it helps to be a bit of a celebrity yourself. As Keith Ferrell details in his biography, John Steinbeck: The Voice of the Land, the Nobel laureate had little patience for autograph seekers, pushy young writers seeking help getting published, and “people who never read books but enjoyed meeting authors.” The shoe went on the other foot when Mrs. Steinbeck let slip to her nephew that Uncle John had met the boy’s movie star crush, Marilyn Monroe. Sudden...
Tags: Google, Film, College, Life, New York City, Marilyn Monroe, Literature, John F Kennedy, Letters, Public Domain, Facebook Twitter, Jon, Julien, John Steinbeck, Steinbeck, Monroe


Artificial Intelligence Identifies the Six Main Arcs in Storytelling: Welcome to the Brave New World of Literary Criticism

Is the singularity upon us? AI seems poised to replace everyone, even artists whose work can seem like an inviolably human industry. Or maybe not. Nick Cave’s poignant answer to a fan question might persuade you a machine will never write a great song, though it might master all the moves to write a good one. An AI-written novel did almost win a Japanese literary award. A suitably impressive feat, even if much of the authorship should be attributed to the program’s human designers. But what abo...
Tags: Google, Technology, College, Atlantic, Literature, Harry Potter, University Of Chicago, Cinderella, Computer Science, Nick Cave, University Of Vermont, Kurt Vonnegut, Facebook Twitter, Adrienne LaFrance, Joseph Campbell, Josh Jones


Fanny Burney in her own words

Born in 1752,  Frances Burney  (better known as Fanny Burney) was well known as a satirical novelist in her time, anonymously publishing her first book,  Evelina , in 1778. Despite her literary influence, Fanny Burney is a name unknown to many aside from the most ardent scholars. Did you know, for instance, that the title of Jane Austen’s  Pride and Prejudice   comes from the pages of Burney’s  Cecilia ? In the eighteenth century, female authors were uncommon due (in part) to social expectati...
Tags: Books, London, Featured, Literature, Jane Austen, Camilla, International Women's Day, Samuel Johnson, Barlow, Alexandre, Burney, George III, Cecilia, Evelina, Fanny, Yale Center for British Art


Jordan Peterson's 10-step process for stronger writing

The best way to improve your thinking is to learn how to write, says Jordan Peterson.His 10-step process for writing an essay is time consuming, but the benefits are worth it. From the granular to the macro, every facet of writing a solid essay is covered in his template. None Becoming a better writer is a means for becoming a better thinker, says Canadian professor Jordan Peterson. Arranging your thoughts on a page in a coherent fashion organizes your thinking process so you can better underst...
Tags: Writing, Washington Post, Communication, Intelligence, Creativity, Innovation, Storytelling, Literature, Philip Roth, Malcolm Gladwell, Tim Ferriss, Derek, Goal-setting, Marie Kondo, Peterson, Gladwell


10 of the most controversial people in Russian history

Russia's history is fascinating and filled with colorful characters. Some of the most influential of them have been extremely controversial. Here are ten of the most interesting, both good and bad.Russia is a fascinating place. Its history is filled with adventures, drama, triumphs, and tragedies. Many of the most interesting people to grace that history have been extremely controversial. Today, we'll look at ten of them. Ivan the Terrible Ivan the Terrible, the first Tsar of Russia, is a househ...
Tags: Europe, Government, China, Germany, Russia, Religion, International, History, Chemistry, Alaska, Innovation, Peng Liyuan, Literature, Philosophy, Siberia, Red Army


5 definitive books on Leonardo da Vinci

Over 7,000 pages have survived of Leonardo da Vinci's personal notebook collection.Leonardo da Vinci's sketches, ruminations and theories make for a thrilling read. Many biographers have attempted to figure out what made da Vinci such a great artist.Centuries have passed and yet we still sing the praises of the quintessential Renaissance man, Leonardo da Vinci. The historic figure, the legend and the man fits the bill for our reverence, intrigue and near worship at times. Da Vinci was an inte...
Tags: Italy, Innovation, Classics, Literature, Biography, Renaissance, Florence, Sigmund Freud, Tuscany, Freud, Da Vinci, Leonardo, Kemp, Leonardo da Vinci, Vinci, Nicholl


A new Dr. Seuss book — 'Horse Museum' — is coming out this fall

The new book will be titled Dr. Seuss's Horse Museum.Author of 45 children's books, Dr. Seuss's profundity mixed seamlessly with his simplicity. Revisit and explore these timeless classics by yourself and with your children. Publisher Random House has announced that a new Dr. Seuss book, Horse Museum, will be released this fall. In it, a horse guides children through a tour of an art museum, teaching them how we all see the world in different ways.The book's release on September 3 will mark ne...
Tags: Art, Books, Earth, Ted, Culture, Illustration, New York Times, Innovation, Classics, Literature, Pablo Picasso, Grinch, Random House, Brian Grazer, Joyner, Dartmouth College


The Elaborate Pictogram Ernest Hemingway Received in the Hospital During WWI: Can You Decode Its Meaning?

Everyone who knows the work of Ernest Hemingway knows A Farewell to Arms, and everyone who knows A Farewell to Arms knows that Hemingway drew on his experience as a Red Cross ambulance driver in Italy during World War I. Just a few months after shipping out, the eighteen-year-old writer-to-be — filled, he later said, with "a great illusion of immortality" — got caught by mortar fire while taking chocolate and cigarettes from the canteen to the front line. Recovering from his wounds in a Milanes...
Tags: Google, College, History, Green, Rebecca, Italy, Literature, Red Cross, Bill, Seoul, Hemingway, Ernest Hemingway, Facebook Twitter, Jenks, Colin Marshall, Faulkner Read Faulkner


Behold The Drawings of Franz Kafka (1907-1917)

Runner 1907-1908 UK-born, Chicago-based artist Philip Hartigan has posted a brief video piece about Franz Kafka’s drawings. Kafka, of course, wrote a body of work, mostly never published during his lifetime, that captured the absurdity and the loneliness of the newly emerging modern world: In The Metamorphosis, Gregor transforms overnight into a giant cockroach; in The Trial, Josef K. is charged with an undefined crime by a maddeningly inaccessible court. In story after story, Kafka showed his...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, UK, Yahoo, College, Los Angeles, Chicago, Literature, Kafka, Vladimir Nabokov, Facebook Twitter, Hollywood Reporter, Hartigan, Franz Kafka, William Faulkner


The British Library Digitizes Its Collection of Obscene Books (1658-1940)

Many people are cheated out of an authentic education in English literature because of a longstanding puritanical approach to its curation. One might spend a lifetime reading the traditional canon without ever, for example, learning much about the long history of popular pornographic British writing, a genre that flourished in the 18th and 19th centuries as the popularity of the novel exploded. Everyone knows the Marquis de Sade, even if they haven’t read him, not least because he lent his name...
Tags: Google, Books, College, Smithsonian, Literature, Smith, British Library, Oscar Wilde, Gale, Facebook Twitter, Pamela, Richardson, Henry Fielding, Justine, Voltaire, Josh Jones


Alice in Wonderland, Hamlet, and A Christmas Carol Written in Shorthand (Circa 1919)

For hundreds of years before the regular use of dictation machines, word processors, and computers, many thousands of court records, correspondence, journalism, and so on circulated in translation. All of these texts were originally in their native language, but they were transcribed in a different writing system, then translated back into the standard orthography, by stenographers using various kinds of shorthand. In English, this meant that a mess of irregular, phonetically nonsensical spellin...
Tags: Google, Books, Japan, Greece, Writing, College, Edgar Allan Poe, Rome, Literature, Lewis Carroll, Shakespeare, Alice, Pepys, Facebook Twitter, Cicero, Europe North America


18 Classic Myths Explained with Animation: Pandora’s Box, Sisyphus & More

Greek myths have an incredible shelf life. We may not retain all the players’ names or the intricacies of the various plot lines, but the creative punishments the gods—Zeus, in particular—visited upon those who displeased them have provided modern mortals with an enduring shorthand for describing our own woes. Tempted to sneak a peek inside a lover’s diary? Take a teeny swig from the liquor cabinet whilst housesitting? Go snooping in your teenager’s Internet history? DON’T DO IT, PANDORA...
Tags: Google, College, Life, New York City, History, Pandora, Animation, K-12, Literature, Facebook Twitter, TED Ed, Sisyphean


Hear a Six-Hour Mix Tape of Hunter S. Thompson’s Favorite Music & the Songs Name-Checked in His Gonzo Journalism

Of all the musical moments in Hunter S. Thompson's formidable corpus of "gonzo journalism," which one comes most readily to mind? I would elect the scene in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas when Thompson's alter-ego Raoul Duke finds his attorney "Dr. Gonzo" in the bathtub, "submerged in green water — the oily product of some Japanese bath salts he'd picked up in the hotel gift shop, along with a new AM/FM radio plugged into the electric razor socket. Top volume. Some gibberish by a thing called '...
Tags: Google, Music, London, College, Bob Dylan, Jimmy Carter, Literature, Las Vegas, Terry Gilliam, Haruki Murakami, Seoul, Keith Richards, Duke, Lennon, Thompson, Joy


Hear a Six-Hour Mix of Hunter S. Thompson’s Favorite Music & the Songs Name-Checked in His Gonzo Journalism

Of all the musical moments in Hunter S. Thompson's formidable corpus of "gonzo journalism," which one comes most readily to mind? I would elect the scene in Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas when Thompson's alter-ego Raoul Duke finds his attorney "Dr. Gonzo" in the bathtub, "submerged in green water — the oily product of some Japanese bath salts he'd picked up in the hotel gift shop, along with a new AM/FM radio plugged into the electric razor socket. Top volume. Some gibberish by a thing called '...
Tags: Google, Music, London, College, Bob Dylan, Jimmy Carter, Literature, Las Vegas, Terry Gilliam, Haruki Murakami, Seoul, Keith Richards, Duke, Lennon, Thompson, Joy


7 of the most popular science books of all time

Chaos theory, evolution and the cosmos make for an eye-opening read. Carl Sagan paints a sagacious picture of humanity's place in the universe.Great scientists give us a glimpse into their minds and their theories.Scientists have been sleuthing through the mysteries and secrets of the universe since humankind first started asking questions. Just what is going on in this grand amphitheater of reality? The courageous and curious sometimes leave their ivory towers to translate their arcane works ...
Tags: Books, Science, Scotland, Time, Earth, Physics, Innovation, Literature, Stephen Hawking, Evolution, Charles Darwin, Dyson, Richard Dawkins, Einstein, Carl Sagan, Darwin


Haruki Murakami Announces an Archive That Will House His Manuscripts, Letters & Collection of 10,000+ Vinyl Records

Image by wakarimasita, via Wikimedia Commons It has become the norm for notable writers to bequeath documents related to their work, and even their personal correspondence, to an institution that promises to maintain it all, in perpetuity, in an archive open to scholars. Often the institution is located at a university to which the writer has some connection, and the case of the Haruki Murakami Library at Tokyo's Waseda University is no exception: Murakami graduated from Waseda in 1975, and a d...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Literature, Tokyo, Haruki Murakami, Seoul, New York Times Magazine, Vinyl Records, Facebook Twitter, Sam Anderson, Waseda University, Murakami, Waseda, Colin Marshall, Miles Davis Glenn Gould


Gustave Doré’s Haunting Illustrations of Dante’s Divine Comedy

Inferno, Canto X: Many artists have attempted to illustrate Dante Alighieri's epic poem the Divine Comedy, but none have made such an indelible stamp on our collective imagination as the Frenchman Gustave Doré. Doré was 23 years old in 1855, when he first decided to create a series of engravings for a deluxe edition of Dante's classic.  He was already the highest-paid illustrator in France, with popular editions of Rabelais and Balzac under his belt, but Doré was unable to convince his publishe...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, College, France, Israel, Edgar Allan Poe, Literature, Hachette, Christ, Dante, Rose, Facebook Twitter, Judas Iscariot, Virgil, Beatrice


Watch the Trailers for Tolkien and Catch-22, Two New Literary Films

For decades, fans of J.R.R. Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings wondered if the books could ever become a film. The Beatles and John Boorman both tried to get adaptations off the ground in the 1960s and 70s, and animator Ralph Bakshi came up with his own cinematic interpretation, if only a partial one, in 1978. But now we live in a world rich with Lord of the Rings and Lord of the Rings-related material on film, thanks to the efforts of director Peter Jackson and his collaborators on not jus...
Tags: Google, Television, Film, College, France, Literature, Finland, George Clooney, Joseph Heller, Mike Nichols, Hulu, Seoul, Peter Jackson, Middle Earth, Tolkien, Ralph Bakshi


10 Golden Age science fiction novels

The early 20th century saw explosive growth for the science fiction genre. A wide range of these books would go on to become classics. These great works explore the strange, zany and absurd profundities of our existence. The first Golden Age of Science Fiction was officially considered to be from 1938 to 1946. As a whole and how most readers view it — the era extended into the early- to mid-1960s. From Jules Verne to earlier proto-science fiction works, the genre has gained more prominence an...
Tags: Art, Books, Science Fiction, London, Mexico, Time, Ray Bradbury, Earth, Culture, George Orwell, Innovation, Literature, Beethoven, Clarke, Arthur C Clarke, Stanley Kubrick


Hear Neil Gaiman Read Aloud 15 of His Own Works, and Works by 6 Other Great Writers: From The Graveyard Book & Coraline, to Edgar Allan Poe’s The Raven & Dickens’ A Christmas Carol

Neil Gaiman is a storyteller. That title encompasses quite a few pursuits, most of which seemingly involve writing — writing novels, writing radio dramas, writing comic books — but he also occasionally tells stories the old-fashioned way: speaking aloud, and to an audience of rapt listeners. Traditionally, such storytelling happened in a circle around the campfire, but as a storyteller of the 21st century — albeit a master of timeless techniques who uses those techniques to deal with tim...
Tags: Google, College, Neil Gaiman, Edgar Allan Poe, Ray Bradbury, Literature, Charles Dickens, Lewis Carroll, Ursula K Le Guin, Seoul, Leonard Cohen, Carol, Dickens, Facebook Twitter, Seuss, Gaiman