Posts filtered by tags: Literature[x]


 

Steven Pinker's 13 rules for writing better

Steven Pinker is many things: linguist, psychologist, optimist, Harvard professor, and author.When it comes to writing, he's a student and a teacher. Here's are his 13 rules for writing better, more simply, and more clearly. 1. Reverse-engineer what you read. 2. Prose is a window onto the world.  3. Don’t go meta.  4. Let verbs be verbs. Interlude for Steven Pinker's view of human nature. Is it evil?  Against chaos: The world is a hard place, but maybe humans aren't ...
Tags: Productivity, Learning, Writing, Communication, Harvard, Innovation, Storytelling, Literature, Steven Pinker, Pinker


New Yorker calls a Sylvia Plath story "lost," but it is easy to find

Here's a tidbit I came across in the excellent Book Curious newsletter: The Lilly Library Twitter account had some excellent words for the New Yorker headline describing the recent publication of a new Sylvia Plath story as "lost." In subsequent tweets, the Lilly's own Rebecca Baumann deftly navigated the line between pointing out erasures of the labor involved in libraries and archives, while encouraging researchers to continue looking for real discoveries. We're not sure how we feel abou...
Tags: Post, News, Libraries, Literature, Sylvia Plath, Lilly, Rebecca Baumann, Lilly Library Twitter, IU Lilly Library


The Books That Samuel Beckett Read and Really Liked (1941-1956)

Samuel Beckett, Pic, 1" by Roger Pic. Via Wikimedia Commons Clad in a black turtleneck and with a shock of white hair, Samuel Beckett was a gaunt, gloomy high priest of modernism. After the 1955 premiere of Samuel Beckett’s play Waiting for Godot (watch him stage a performance here), Kenneth Tynan quipped, ''It has no plot, no climax, no denouement; no beginning, no middle and no end.'' From there, Beckett’s work only got more austere, bleak and despairing. His 1969 play Breath, for instance,...
Tags: Google, Books, Yahoo, College, Los Angeles, Literature, Around The World, Albert Camus, Samuel Beckett, Agatha Christie, Christie, Facebook Twitter, Beckett, Hollywood Reporter, Theodor Fontane, Suzanne


Actress Lucy Lawless Performs the Proto-Feminist Comedy “Lysistrata” for The Partially Examined Life Podcast

Remember Lucy, aka Xena the Warrior Princess, perhaps better known to younger folks as Ron Swanson's (eventual) wife on Parks and Recreation? Before her career re-launched via major roles on Spartacus, Salem, and Ash vs. Evil Dead, she took some time off to study philosophy and so got involved with The Partially Examined Life Philosophy Podcast, which is coming up on its 10th birthday and has now been downloaded more than 25 million times. She has now joined the gang for cold-read on-air perfor...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Stephen King, Bbc, Literature, Spike Lee, Harold Pinter, Lucy, Parks, Facebook Twitter, Chi Raq, Sartre, Jean Paul Sartre, Ron Swanson, Lucy Lawless


Classic Illustrations of Edgar Allan Poe’s Stories by Gustave Doré, Édouard Manet, Harry Clarke, Aubrey Beardsley & Arthur Rackham

What do you see when you read the work of Edgar Allan Poe? The great age of the illustrated book is far behind us. Aside from cover designs, most modern editions of Poe’s work circulate in text-only form. That’s just fine, of course. Readers should be trusted to use their imaginations, and who can forget indelible descriptions like “The Tell-Tale Heart”’s “eye of a vulture—a pale, blue eye, with a film over it”? We need no picture book to make that image come alive. Yet, when we first discover ...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Edgar Allan Poe, Brooklyn, Literature, Clarke, Alice, Poe, édouard Manet, Manet, Don Quixote, Harry Clarke, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Daniel Horowitz


Early Predictions of the Internet Date Back to 19th Century Sci-Fi

Science fiction writers are professional future-dreamers, imagining worlds far beyond their own. With technology advancing at astronomical rates, real life feels more and more like sci-fi every day (for better or worse). So it’s fun to look back at those writers who, decades and even centuries ago, imagined what life…Read more...
Tags: Science Fiction, Science, The Internet, Literature, Internet History


An Illustrated and Interactive Dante’s Inferno: Explore a New Digital Companion to the Great 14th-Century Epic Poem

Medieval conceptions of hell may have little effect on the laws and social mores of our secular age. But they sure as hell did in the late 15th century, when the first illustrated editions of Dante’s Inferno appeared. A 1481 edition contained art based on a series of unfinished illustrations by Renaissance master Sandro Botticelli. In 1491, the first fully-illustrated edition of the Inferno arrived. As were most printed works at the time, these books were elaborate and expensive, reflecting the...
Tags: Google, Design, College, Literature, Dante, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Botticelli, Durham NC Follow, Sandro Botticelli, Interactive Dante, New Digital Companion, Alberto Martini


The continuing life of science fiction

In 1998, Thomas M. Disch boldly declared in The Dreams Our Stuff Is Made Of: How Science Fiction Conquered the World that science fiction had become the main kind of fiction which was commenting on contemporary social reality. As a professional writer, we could object that Disch had a vested interest in making this assertion, but virtually every day news items confirm his argument that science fiction connects with an amazingly broad range of public issues.Take the ongoing debate over different ...
Tags: Star Wars, Books, Science Fiction, Usa, UK, Featured, Film, Nasa, Avatar, Cameron, Literature, Sci Fi, Scifi, Philip K Dick, James Cameron, Neal Stephenson


Public Domain Day Is Finally Here!: Copyrighted Works Have Entered the Public Domain Today for the First Time in 21 Years

Earlier this year we informed readers that thousands of works of art and entertainment would soon enter the public domain—to be followed every year by thousands more. That day is nigh upon us: Public Domain Day, January 1, 2019. At the stroke of midnight, such beloved classics as Robert Frost’s “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” and “Yes! We Have No Bananas” will become the common property of the people, to be quoted at length or in full anywhere when the copyright expires on work produced ...
Tags: Google, Art, Film, College, History, Creativity, Atlantic, Winston Churchill, Smithsonian, Literature, James Joyce, Walt Disney, Virginia Woolf, Harlem, First Time, Mickey Mouse


Isaac Asimov Predicts in 1983 What the World Will Look Like in 2019: Computerization, Global Co-operation, Leisure Time & Moon Mining

Painting of Asimov on his throne by Rowena Morill, via Wikimedia Commons “It’s difficult to make predictions,” they say, “especially about the future.” The witticism has been variously attributed. If Yogi Berra said it, it's adorable nonsense, if Mark Twain, dry plainspoken irony. If Niels Bohr, however, we have a statement that makes us wonder what exactly “the future” could mean in a radically uncertain universe. If scientists can’t predict the future, who can? Science fiction writers, of cou...
Tags: Google, Science, College, New York Times, Literature, Clarke, Sci Fi, Mark Twain, Philip K Dick, Facebook Twitter, Yogi Berra, Josh Jones, Isaac Asimov, Wikimedia Commons, New York World, Niels Bohr


Public Domain Day Is Coming: On January 1st, 2019, Copyrighted Works Will Enter the Public Domain for the First Time in 21 Years

Earlier this year we informed readers that thousands of works of art and entertainment would soon enter the public domain—to be followed every year by thousands more. That day is nigh upon us: Public Domain Day, January 1, 2019. At the stroke of midnight, such beloved classics as Robert Frost’s “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” and “Yes! We Have No Bananas” will become the common property of the people, to be quoted at length or in full anywhere when the copyright expires on work produced ...
Tags: Google, Art, Film, College, History, Creativity, Atlantic, Winston Churchill, Smithsonian, Literature, James Joyce, Walt Disney, Virginia Woolf, Harlem, First Time, Mickey Mouse


9 most common New Year’s resolutions — and how to make them happen

The top three New Year's resolutions for 2018 were to eat healthier, get more exercise, and save more money. Care to guess what the top three are this year?We check in with experts to devise strategies for tackling the most common New Year's resolutions.Knowing exactly what you want to accomplish and how you will do it can help increase your chances of success in 2019.With New Year's rounding the corner, everyone is sharing their 2019 resolutions, and it's giving us that auld déjà vu. According...
Tags: Health, Motivation, Facebook, Cdc, Failure, Happiness, Stephen King, Choice, Netflix, Maine, Innovation, Literature, Yougov, Harvard Business Review, Personal Growth, Goal-setting


Listen to a Heartfelt Musical Retelling of O. Henry’s “Gift of the Magi” with Hanky in Hand

It’s that time of year when certain songs conspire with certain moods to hit you right in the ol’ brisket. The feeling is voluptuous, and not necessarily unpleasant, provided there’s a bathroom stall or spare bedroom should you need to flee a party like Cinderella, as some old chestnut threatens to turn you into a blubbering mess. Let the kiddies deck the halls, jingle bells, and prance about with Rudolph and Frosty. The best secular songs for grown ups are the ones with a thick current of long...
Tags: Google, Music, New York, Taylor Swift, College, Life, New York City, Christopher Lee, Gold, James Brown, Paul Mccartney, Literature, Coldplay, Cinderella, Joni Mitchell, Romeo


How Emily Dickinson Writes A Poem: A Short Video Introduction

It became fashionable during the European Renaissance for poets to write what is called an ars poetica, a “meditation on poetry using the form and techniques of a poem.” The form follows Horace’s 19th century, B.C.E. Ars Poetica, in which the Roman writer recommends that poetry should both “instruct and delight.” Theories of poetry varied from one generation to the next, but the ars poetica persisted throughout modern literary history and into the modernism of Archibald Macleish, Ezra Po...
Tags: Google, College, Poetry, Literature, Emily Dickinson, Facebook Twitter, Moore, Dickinson, Evan Puschak, MacLeish, Horace, Marianne Moore, Durham NC Follow, Puschak, DelightThe Truth, kindThe Truth


How the CIA Helped Shape the Creative Writing Scene in America

Image by Arielle Fragassi, via Flickr Commons In May of 1967,” writes Patrick Iber at The Awl, “a former CIA officer named Tom Braden published a confession in the Saturday Evening Post under the headline, ‘I’m glad the CIA is ‘immoral.’” With the hard-boiled tone one might expect from a spy, but the candor one may not, Braden revealed the Agency’s funding and support of all kinds of individuals and activities, including, perhaps most controversially, in the arts. Against objections that so man...
Tags: Google, Europe, Politics, Writing, Washington Post, College, China, America, Peter Matthiessen, New York Times, Iowa, Literature, Cia, Whitney, New Yorker, Kurt Vonnegut


7 of the most interesting fictional drugs

Fictional drugs are a major part of the lore and foundation for many science fiction stories. The unique effects they have on their characters is an interesting new way to explore important issues. Many of these fictional drugs are synonymous with the stories that have been told.Fiction writers have always been good at whisking us away to strange and new alien worlds, places we've never dreamed of and that would never have seen the light of day if they had not been coaxed from the author's wild...
Tags: Psychology, Art, Science Fiction, Movies, Religion, Iran, Innovation, Speaker, Literature, Stanley Kubrick, Soma, Anthony Burgess, Saints, Philip K Dick, Alex, Larry Niven


The past, present, and future of MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States

Gary Totten is professor and chair of the department of English at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. He also serves as Editor-in-Chief of the journal MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States. In this interview session, we ask Gary Totten a few questions to learn more about his work, and the coming work for the field and the journal.Oxford University Press: Can you tell us a bit about the history of the Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States journal?Gary Totten: The Society fo...
Tags: Books, Featured, US, Mit, United States, Literature, UConn, Joe, Public Domain, Katharine, Martha, Modern Language Association, University of Nevada Las Vegas, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Oxford University Press, UMass Amherst


Argentine hacker mods Furby so it quotes Borges, creates a "Borgy"

Argentine hacker [Roni Bandini] modded a 1998 Furby so that it responds to stimulus by rattling off a random quote from Jorge Luis Borges. He calls it "Borgy." [Roni] hacked the Furby to replace the speaker with a more powerful one, and built a base to hold the larger speaker and a switch which can activate Borgy. He also used an Arduino Nano and a Sparkfun MP3 player shield loaded with the samples of Borges. When the Furby speaks, it shares some wisdom from Borges. It’s a simple, but a s...
Tags: Videos, Post, Happy Mutants, Toys, Video, Copyfight, News, Makers, Youtube, Literature, Jorge Luis Borges, Arduino Nano, Borges, Furby, Roni, Garden Of Forking Paths


There are two different types of Jane Austen fans

There is a theory current among many of my fellow Janeites about what kind of a Jane Austen devotee one can be. Either, it is said, one unreservedly cleaves to the Austen of Pride and Prejudice and Emma, or one empathically embraces the Austen of Persuasion and Sense and Sensibility. One cannot love both, not equally, not without reservations about one or the other set of works, even if one likes and admires all of Austen’s writing.I nevertheless place myself squarely in the second camp. Persuas...
Tags: Books, Featured, Literature, Jane Austen, Philosophy, Wentworth, Anne, Emma, Austen, Hume, Mansfield Park, Gilbert Ryle, Woodhouse, Emma Emma, Arts & Humanities, Emma Woodhouse


The path of bliss: 11 epic quotes from Joseph Campbell

The famous academic will forever be known for his message to "follow your bliss".George Lucas admitted that Star Wars was heavily influenced by Campbell. The Power of Myth remains one of the most popular public television series of all time. None Very few biographies can be described in three words, yet the entirety of mythologist Joseph Campbell's career has often been summed up in one simple message: follow your bliss. Problem is, this catchphrase has been stripped of much of its intended mea...
Tags: Psychology, Hollywood, Religion, Innovation, Storytelling, Literature, Buddhism, George Lucas, Joe, Derek, Bill Moyers, Buddha, Campbell, Joyce, Joseph Campbell, Ancient World


4 books on race in America everyone should read

These books, from authors like Toni Morrison and John F. Kennedy, open up a whole new perspective on the American landscape.Read Jose Antonio Vargas' groundbreaking essay on life as an undocumented migrant in The New York Times Magazine.Vargas' memoir, Dear America, Notes of an Undocumented Citizen, is out now. The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison Growing up, no book stimulated me more than Morrison's The Bluest Eye. I was first assigned to read the book in eighth grade and the "why" of the story h...
Tags: Art, Race, Immigration, America, House, Innovation, Refugees, Marilyn Monroe, Literature, Elvis Presley, John F Kennedy, Toni Morrison, Kennedy, Morrison, Sandra Cisneros, Angelou


Why Should We Read Kurt Vonnegut? An Animated Video Makes the Case

Beneath Kurt Vonnegut’s grim, absurdist humor beat the heart of a humanist, but not, by any stretch, an optimist. Vonnegut looked balefully at every project intended to improve the sorry state of human affairs. In Player Piano, for example, he imagines a future very much like that envisioned for us by our contemporary technocratic elite: nearly all work has been automated and the mass of unemployed are given a modest stipend for their living and funneled into what anthropologist David Gr...
Tags: Google, Books, Ge, College, New York Times, Literature, Philip K Dick, General Electric, Dresden, Kurt Vonnegut, Irish Times, HARRIS, Facebook Twitter, Durham NC, WNYC, Josh Jones


7 of the best psychedelic books ever written

Psychedelic literature contains some of the richest prose and musings on the human condition. A great deal of these books hail from the 20th century. These are gateway books to a rich and other worldly adventureMuch has been said about the psychedelic experience and its rich and thrilling history. Luckily for us, some of the greatest pioneers who pushed forward into the choppy waters of the mind wrote it all down. Packed with governmental intrigue, freak-out trips and the loving grace of huma...
Tags: Psychology, Amazon, Mexico, America, Harvard, Innovation, Literature, Philosophy, Johnny Depp, Las Vegas, Hunter S Thompson, William Blake, Kafka, Ludlow, Thompson, Dennis


New Hemingway Book Launch at Abbey Bookshop

Article by Secrets of Paris contributor Yvonne Shao One of the best parts of being an English speaker in Paris is the abundance of literary opportunities available throughout the city. Paris has always been a cultural mecca and often the temporary or permanent home of many English-speaking writers, from Ben Franklin to Mark Twain to the Lost Generation and beyond. Ernest Hemingway captured the imagination of worldwide readers like no other, and people come from all over to experience “...
Tags: Travel, Boston, Ben Franklin, Paris, Literature, Mark Twain, Hemingway, Ernest Hemingway, Patrick, Sean, Katakis, Severin, Recommended Reading, Les Deux Magots, Abbey Bookshop, Brian Spence


These Four Manuscripts Contain All of the Literature Written in Old English–and Beyond That, There’s Nothing More

Book historians and rare manuscript librarians do not have the most glamorous jobs by the usual standards. They deal with weathered, tattered, fragmentary scraps of text in archaic languages and lettering. It’s work unlikely to receive the Hollywood (or Netflix) treatment unless wizards, witches, or occult detectives are involved. But the relative obscurity of these professions does not make the work any less valuable. Without dedicated archivists and preservationists, a slow collective amnesia...
Tags: Google, Europe, Hollywood, College, History, Literature, British Library, Livingstone, English Language, Benjamin, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Walter Benjamin, Durham NC Follow, Anglo Saxon Kingdoms, Josephine Livingstone


The Entire Literary History of Old English Is Contained in These Four Manuscripts

Book historians and rare manuscript librarians do not have the most glamorous jobs by the usual standards. They deal with weathered, tattered, fragmentary scraps of text in archaic languages and lettering. It’s work unlikely to receive the Hollywood (or Netflix) treatment unless wizards, witches, or occult detectives are involved. But the relative obscurity of these professions does not make the work any less valuable. Without dedicated archivists and preservationists, a slow collective amnesia...
Tags: Google, Europe, Hollywood, College, History, Literature, British Library, Livingstone, English Language, Benjamin, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Walter Benjamin, Durham NC Follow, Anglo Saxon Kingdoms, Josephine Livingstone


James Patterson on writing: Plotting, research, and first drafts

James Patterson has sold 300 million copies of his 130 books, making him one of the most successful authors alive today. He talks about how some writers can overdo it by adding too much research, or worse, straying from their outline for too long. James' latest book, The President is Missing, co-written with former President Bill Clinton, is out now. The President Is Missing: A Novel by now at amazone --> List ...
Tags: Books, Writing, Creativity, Bill Clinton, Innovation, Storytelling, Literature, James Patterson, James


10 pieces of wisdom from Alan Watts

Though the British philosopher died in 1973, his work continues to make an impact. A recently published collection, The Collected Letters Alan Watts, is a deep dive into his personal correspondences. Watts was an early proponent for spreading Eastern philosophy to Western culture. None Shortly after Alan Watts's death in 1973, his eldest daughters, Joan and Anne, began collecting boxes of his letters and correspondences. Though it took decades to publish, The Collected Letters of Alan Watts add...
Tags: Religion, Intelligence, Innovation, Literature, Philosophy, Joan, Curiosity, Personal Growth, Derek, Anne, Watts, Alan Watts


A lesson in allegorical storytelling [podcast]

National Novel Writing Month challenges writers from all over the world to complete a 50,000-word novel within the month of November. To help guide our readers who have taken on the challenge, we reached out to three-time National Jewish Book Award winner Howard Schwartz.The podcast below recounts the story of “The Lost Princess,” a fairytale by Rabbi Nachman of Bratslav that has all the expected elements: a king, a lost princess, a quest, three giants, and an enchanted palace. Howard offers a d...
Tags: Books, Podcast, Featured, Israel, Religion, Jerusalem, Trade, Literature, God, Multimedia, Temple, Hans Christian Andersen, Howard, Jasmin, Eliezer, National Novel Writing Month


Why American history lives between the cracks

History is written by lions. But it's also recorded by lambs.In order to understand American history, we need to look at the events of the past as more prismatic than the narrative given to us in high school textbooks.Including different voices can paint a more full and vibrant portrait of America. Which is why more walks of American life can and should be storytellers. The Light of the World: A Memoir (Pulitzer Prize in Letters: Biography...
Tags: Art, Books, Video, Poetry, America, History, United States, Innovation, Literature, Novel, Jwplatform.com