Posts filtered by tags: Louis XV[x]


 

‘Dude’, ‘Grotesque’, And Other Words That Came From High-Culture History

Dude seems to have developed from a pejorative epithet for a man about as far as possible from Jeff Bridges’s character as one could get. Grotesque came from a hole in the ground in Rome. Picturesque originally referred to actual pictures — specifically, a particular style of painting. Silhouette started as Louis XV’s treasury secretary, became a snippy insult, and only then came to refer to framed side-views of a person, cut from black paper. – BBC
Tags: Art, Words, Jeff Bridges, Grotesque, Louis XV, 05.08.19, Rome Picturesque


Gilded Age mansions in Florida

Florida generally gives about as much regard to its history as its people do to common sense. That said, though the state has bulldozed much of its past for condos, some of the grandest structures ever built in America still remain there. Even before the advent of air conditioning, Florida was a popular winter retreat for wealthy northerners, particularly during the period between the Civil War and the Great Depression, much of which is known as the “Gilded Age.” During this time, grand pala...
Tags: Travel, Europe, Florida, America, Spain, Chicago, United States, Ford, Bill Gates, Italy, Miami, Venice, Jeff Bezos, Cuba, Seattle, Detroit


A performance of Vivaldi's La Senna festeggiante by Arcangelo

In 1726 on 25 August, Jacques-Vincent Languet, Comte de Gergy, the new French ambassador to the Venetian Republic held a celebration for the name day of King Louis XV of France. There was a new piece of music performed in the loggia at the foot of Languet's garden with an audience of diplomats and, watching from gondolas, Venetian nobles.
Tags: France, Religion, Vivaldi, Louis XV, Venetian Republic, Arcangelo, Jacques Vincent Languet Comte de Gergy, Languet


Van Gogh’s The Night Café Was Among His “Ugliest Pictures”

In a letter to his brother Theo, Vincent van Gogh called his 1888 oil painting The Night Café “one of the ugliest pictures I have done”. In this video, Evan Puschak looks at what van Gogh meant by that and how he used discordant colors together to suggest a mood. van Gogh wrote of his intentions for the painting to his brother: I have tried to express the terrible passions of humanity by means of red and green. The room is blood red and dark yellow with a green billiard table in the mi...
Tags: Van Gogh, Jason Kottke, Vincent Van Gogh, Gogh, Evan Puschak, Louis XV, Theo Vincent van Gogh


Mascarons... Macron

The other day, last Monday, I walked along part of the rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré, from rue Royale to the Elysée Palace. This part of the street is where you find a number of 18th century palaces, some of them now embassy residences (Japan, U.S.A, United Kingdom…), and also some other mostly rather ancient buildings. It was obviously in fashion to decorate older buildings by “mascarons” , often grotesque faces. Paris is full of them, so we should take the ones I will show just a...
Tags: Travel, Japan, United Kingdom, Paris, Palace, Emmanuel Macron, Elysee Palace, Rue Royale, Louis XV, Macron, French Republic, Paris 8, Rue du Faubourg Saint Honoré, PeterParis, Mascarons Macron


How Luxury Hotels Can Co-Design for Suite Success | By Karen Loynaz and Gregg Rockett

Imagine walking into a hotel room designed by your favorite fashion brand, everything from the curtains to the bed linens emulates the brand perfectly. How much would you pay to sleep with your favorite brand? Leaders of luxury including Coco Chanel, Diane Von Furstenberg, and Bottega Veneta are now partnering with luxury hotels around the world to co-design fashion-forward hotel suites. Much like the hefty price-tag of a fresh-off-the runway design, "branded" designer suites can cost up ...
Tags: Travel, New York City, Victoria Beckham, Dior, Fifth Avenue, Ugg, Karl Lagerfeld, Bentley, Louis Vuitton, Tiffany, Marriott International, Tiffany Co, Bottega Veneta, Louis XV, St Regis, Alexander Wang


An Animated History of Versailles: Six Minutes of Animation Show the Construction of the Grand Palace Over 400 Years

Few tourists making their first trip to France go home without having seen Versailles. But why do so many want to see Versailles in the first place? Yes, its history goes all the way back to the 1620s, with its comparatively modest beginnings as a hunting lodge built for King Louis XIII, but much in Europe goes back quite a bit further. It did house the French royal family for generations, but absolute monarchy hasn't been a favored institution in France for quite some time. Only the mos...
Tags: Google, Europe, College, France, History, Architecture, Paris, Seoul, Versailles, Facebook Twitter, Louis XIII, Louis XV, Louis XIV, Colin Marshall, Fifth Republic, 21st Century Los Angeles


Tips for visiting Versailles

Versailles is an immense art piece. Everything currently on the 2,000-acre estate was thought out, designed, and built meticulously over 100 years (1683-1785) to become the outstanding place it is today. And although every single nook and cranny of the estate, from the furniture in the palace to the groves and paths in the gardens, is worth seeing, you probably only have a limited amount of time in your hands. That’s why we’ve asked French art historian and architecture expert Dorian Dallonge...
Tags: Travel, Culture, Paris, Grand Canal, Grand Trianon, Marie Antoinette, Versailles, Louis XV, Louis XIV, Takashi, Le Brun, Jacky, Sofia Coppola, Petit Trianon, de Gaulle, XVI


Mascarons... Macron

The other day, last Monday, I walked along part of the rue du Faubourg Saint-Honoré, from rue Royale to the Elysée Palace. This part of the street is where you find a number of 18th century palaces, some of them now embassy residences (Japan, U.S.A, United Kingdom…), and also some other mostly rather ancient buildings. It was obviously in fashion to decorate older buildings by “mascarons” , often grotesque faces. Paris is full of them, so we should take the ones I will show just a...
Tags: Travel, Japan, United Kingdom, Paris, Palace, Emmanuel Macron, Elysee Palace, Rue Royale, Louis XV, Macron, French Republic, Paris 8, Rue du Faubourg Saint Honoré, PeterParis, Mascarons Macron


10 Things Nobody Tells You About Marble Countertops

Marble is beloved as a timeless and classic material, adding a note of luxury to any room. But even on the Remodelista and Gardenista editorial teams, we’ve run into a few things we wish we had known before we shelled out for marble in our renovations: Julie inadvertently discovered what happens when lemon juice meets newly installed marble countertops, and Michelle excitedly installed a marble backsplash behind her stove only to discover that’s the worst place for a porous stone. We’re here to ...
Tags: Amazon, Europe, Books, Greece, Colorado, France, David, Materials, Maine, Italy, Vancouver, Brussels, North America, Copenhagen, Vermont, La Dolce Vita


An enormous fountain … for very little water.

This enormous fountain, the “Fontaine des Quatre Saisons” (Four Seasons), can be found in a rather narrow street, rue de Grenelle. The narrowness of the street makes it difficult to get a complete view … and to take decent photos. This fountain, one of Paris’ largest and most decorated ones, was built during the years 1739-45 during the reign of Louis XV. There were obviously long discussions about where to place this fountain and finally one decided for a “wrong place”. Many p...
Tags: Travel, France, Paris, Seine, Belgrade, Louis, Fleury, Voltaire, Louis XV, Ottoman Empire, Peter Olson, Paris 7, Kingdom of France


How to crush the Louvre in one day

Everything in the Louvre is worth seeing. But unless you live in Paris and visit the museum daily until the end of your days, you will never see everything. To make sure your visit is packed with heaps of amazing art that won’t bore the heck out of you, we’ve asked Louvre expert Dorian Dallongeville to give us the lowdown on how to crush this gigantic museum in one day. Dorian Dallongeville started studying Art History in high school when he was 16 years old. He made the discipline his major ...
Tags: Travel, France, Iraq, Nike, Egypt, Paris, Dan Brown, Travel Tips, Napoleon, Louvre, Versailles, Saint Louis, Louis, Leonardo da Vinci, Louis XV, Hieronymous Bosch


Remodeling 101: What Is Crown Molding? Plus, What You Need to Know

Many of us spend our days surrounded by molding, the trim often used around windows, doors, and on ceilings in interiors. But how much time do we spend thinking about it? Precious little, right? But the day may come when you actually need to know about molding, so let us give you a head start. We decided to start with crown molding, a whole category unto itself. (We’ll circle back to other kinds of molding in a later post—stay tuned.) To find out the crucial points, we talked to architect James ...
Tags: Home Depot, Books, UK, London, New York City, Paris, Manhattan, Cape Cod, Traditional, Dixon, Justine, Fort Greene, Louis XV, Howard Walker, Architectural Details, Remodeling 101


Beat the Summer Holiday Crowds – Book Birmingham to Bordeaux in May

Although many travellers take their holidays in the summer months, May is just around the corner and a time just before huge crowds hit their favourite holiday destinations. Travelling from Birmingham to Bordeaux in May does make a lot of sense, especially if you want to get in a bit of wine tasting. Even taking a single week off to avoid the crowds is a perfect getaway and you can always plan the rest of your holiday later in the summer when the crowds begin to thin a little. Birmingham Airpo...
Tags: Travel, France, Paris, Birmingham, Bordeaux, Travel Blog, World Heritage, Louis, France Bordeaux, Louis XV, Bordeaux Vineyards, Pont de Pierre, Jacques Gabriel, Michel Corajoud


Expert Advice: A Foolproof Guide to Furniture Styles with Christophe Pourny, Part II

Here at Remodelista, we often find ourselves asking things such as: Is that a French Provincial or Queen Anne–style chair in the corner of the living room we’re writing about? Thus, our New Year’s resolution: Take a refresher course on the history of furniture, and learn a few tips and tricks to identify the main styles. We turned to Christophe Pourny, a renowned Brooklyn-based restoration expert and author of The Furniture Bible: Everything You Need to Know to Identify, Restore, and Care for Fu...
Tags: Books, England, London, France, Germany, Uncategorized, Furniture, Brooklyn, William, Expert Advice, Versailles, Anne, Spitalfields, Louis XV, Louis XIV, Louis XVI


Expert Advice: A Foolproof Guide to Furniture Styles with Christophe Pourny, Part I

A few weeks back, sitting around Julie’s dining room table in Brooklyn Heights, a few of us got to talking about sleuthing out the styles of furniture in our posts. We admit it: despite writing about design every day, there are still a few things that confuse us. For example: How can you tell the difference between, say, Louis XV and Louis XVI furniture? And what exactly does the term “modern” refer to? Enter Christophe Pourny, the renowned Brooklyn-based restoration expert who’s written the boo...
Tags: Books, England, New York, London, Uncategorized, Furniture, Brooklyn, Expert Advice, Brooklyn Heights, Julie, Louis XV, Louis XVI, Skeen, Antiques & Vintage, Wood Furniture, Christophe Pourny


Tea and Treats – The Perfect Finale to Your Holiday Fete!

Your calendar is filling with fun times meeting and greeting your peeps…the holiday season is here! To prepare for both your planned gatherings and those inevitable drop-in guests, why not keep some special cakes, cookies and of course Bigelow Tea on hand??  Seasonal Bigelow tea flavors like EggNogg’n, Peppermint Bark ,  Hot Cinnamon and Ginger Snappish are fun to serve at any get together.  As for the welcome sweet treats, Bigelow’s #TeaProudly community and resident chefs have developed some ...
Tags: Tea, Cook, France, New Hampshire, Recipes, Cookies, Green Tea, Louie, Madeleine, Louis XV, Bigelow, Bigelow Tea, Tea Recipes, Bigelow Constant Comment, Confectioners, Iced Tea


The Lancaster Hotel and Monsieur Restaurant

The Lancaster Hotel, just off the Champs Elysees, is one of the more elegant hotels in Paris. A former hotel particulier (private mansion) built in 1889; it was occupied by Spanish nobleman Santiago Drake del Castillo. Swiss hotelier Emile Wolf bought the property in 1925 and converted and enlarged it, making it into an eight-floor luxury hotel. He filled the hotel with antiques including a substantial collection of Louis XV and XVI furniture. Last week I was invited for a tour of the hote...
Tags: Travel, France, Hotels, Paris, Restaurant Reviews, Marlene Dietrich, Louis XV, Greta Garbo, Dale Chihuly, Dietrich, Monsieur, Richard Nahem, Montmartre St Germain, Josef von Sternberg, Lancaster Hotel, Santiago Drake


Ecole Militaire

For a first time I got inside the “Ecole Militaire” . Unfortunately (or in a certain way, fortunately), the main building was covered by tarpaulins due to renovation work.  This military school was created in the mid-18th century during the reign of Louis XV – a need to improve the French military knowledge level was clearly felt. The architect was Ange-Jacques Gabriel  - who was also the architect of the Petit Traianon and the Opera at Versailles (see previous posts), the buildi...
Tags: Travel, Unesco, Google Earth, Eiffel Tower, Versailles, Louis XV, Peter Olson, Ecole Militaire, Paris 7, Ange Jacques Gabriel


“Take control”: delusions of sovereignty

The phrase “take control” served as a mantra for the Vote Leave campaign in the United Kingdom’s referendum of 2016 about its membership of the European Union. The country was held to the same constraints and obligations as the EU’s other twenty-seven members. the United Kingdom, as the campaigners declared, could not manage its own borders, organise its own trade, define and regulate the rights of its own citizens ,and, above all, determine its own laws. Admittedly, none of these incapacities w...
Tags: Terminology, Europe, Books, UK, England, Featured, Greece, France, Eu, European Union, History, Rome, Eu Referendum, United Kingdom, Paris, Republican


Restoration...

I already wrote about the Madeleine Church , e.g. here and here, but walking by the other day I was struck by the ongoing cleaning and renovation job and thought I must have a new look. The cleaning really makes you observe “details” that you normally just may neglect, see top picture. Here we have some views of the “before”, “during” and “after” cleaning. The Madeleine Church has a rather curious history… In 1753 Louis XV decided to have a church built here, t...
Tags: Travel, Denis, Napoleon, Windsor, Mary Magdalene, Louis XV, Mary Magdalena, Gabriel Fauré, Camille Saint Saens, Peter Olson, Paris 8, Cavaillé Coll, Louis XVIII, Madeleine Church, Florence Baptistery, Henri de Triqueti


The Guardian view on Macron and Putin: pressing, not pushing away | Editorial

The French president did not mute his views in addressing his Russian counterpart – but nor did he shut the door to improving the relationshipWhen Peter the Great travelled to France in 1717, Louis XV was only seven years old. On meeting him, the tsar grasped the child king in his arms and lifted him up from the floor to kiss him heartily, shocking onlookers with his disregard of court formalities. An exhibit marking that visit’s tercentenary was the formal occasion for the meeting between Emman...
Tags: Europe, Putin, Vladimir Putin, France, Angela Merkel, Russia, World news, Donald Trump, Versailles, Emmanuel Macron, Louis XV, Macron, Peter the Great, Emmanuel Macron France


Louis Vuitton x Jeff Koons Collaboration: Girl with Dog by Fragonard

Masters – A collaboration between Louis Vuitton and artist Jeff Koons, remixes the iconic artworks of the old masters and presents them in a way that encourages new interpretations. Jeff Koons has brought imagery from his long-standing “Gazing Ball” paintings – a series of large-scale hand-painted reproductions of works by the Old Masters – to a range of Louis Vuitton products. Having the names of the artists in reflective type is in a way performing a function like the gazing ball in the “Gazin...
Tags: Fashion, France, US, House, Fragonard, Jeff Koons, Louis Vuitton, Monogram, UniCredit, Munich Germany, Louis XV, Ancien Regime, Da Vinci Titian Rubens Fragonard, Neverfull, Fragonard Fragonard, Alte Pinakothek


Gilt Louis Chairs (pair) (san carlos) $650

Beautiful ornate Louis XV chairs Heavy with gold gilt and high end fabric. One chair has some cracks that can be repaired.
Tags: Craigslist, Louis XV, Gilt Louis Chairs


France and U.S. -- Art & Politics two centuries apart

Getty Museum Entrance Pavilion featuring Edme Bouchardon's The Sleeping Faun (1726-30) As imposing as it is, never before has the entrance hall of the Getty Museum looked as dramatic and impressive as it does now, with the newly installed life-size marble sculpture of the Sleeping Fawn by 18th century French artist Edme Bouchardon (1698-1762). The presentation of this sculpture plays a role not unlike that of a musical overture at the beginning of an Italian opera before the curtain goes up...
Tags: London, News, Obama, France, Los Angeles, Barack Obama, Rome, Hillary Clinton, New York Times, Paris, Npr, Getty, Hillary, Edward, Huffington Post, KCRW


The Fragrances Everyone — Even Your Pickiest Friend — Wants This Year

Never gift a fragrance, they say. Perfumes are so personal, they say. Go for something safe, they say. But where's the fun in that? We like a challenge, and we also like to think we know our friends and family members pretty damn well. Probably too well. (Like mom, what made you think I needed to know details about when I was conceived?)If you're a gift-giving risk-taker, then you've come to the right place. We sniffed the latest and greatest scents and matched each to a type of person we all k...
Tags: Facebook, Fashion, Music, Barneys New York, Philippe Starck, Kate Spade, Marc Jacobs, Sephora, Neiman Marcus, Cheek, Kate Spade New York, Rose, Christian Louboutin, Bloomingdale, Daisy, Louis XV


Explore America’s Neighborhoods: French Quarter, New Orleans

Historic neighborhoods are primarily venerated for preserving a certain look and feel of the past. However, most of the architecture within these neighborhoods are quite homogenous, exemplifying Edwardian, Victorian or Colonial styles. Yet, New Orleans’ French Quarter dared to embrace different influences during its youth, transforming this neighborhood into an oasis of Spanish, French, Creole, and American influences. The Vieux Carré is first and foremost a visual extravaganza. The mesh of diff...
Tags: Facebook, News, Mississippi, America, Spain, Radio, New Orleans, Louisiana, Latest News, Mississippi River, Mardi Gras, Jackson Square, French Quarter, Louis XV, Charles III, Louisiana Purchase


The King and I: Remembering King Bhumibol

In the early 1950s our record of the month club--started by my late husband, Sam Josefowitz--was expanding into other countries. Concert Hall Society, Handel Society, Opera Society, and Jazztone Society were the first clubs to provide members with a record every month. They were made of red vinyl--78s with artistically designed covers. One day unexpectedly, we received an invitation from King Bhumibol to visit him in his palace. The king was an aficionado and wanted to meet us and talk music, pa...
Tags: Travel, Iran, Thailand, Sam, Huffington Post, Lausanne, Shah, Siam, Lausanne Switzerland, Louis XV, Bangkok Airport, Bhumibol, Dr. Natasha Josefowitz, Natasha Josefowitz


Marie Antoinette Had A Really Gross Skin-Care Secret

Photographed by Cory Dawson; Prop Styling by Chloe Daley. This story was originally published on March 11, 2016.Besides being one of the most misunderstood females in history, doomed French Queen Marie Antoinette is also an object of fascination to everyone from historians to fashion designers (See: Karl Lagerfeld's Queen Marie-inspired 2013 cruise collection, held at Versailles). So, when I was looking for the next famous face to tackle for my historical beauty routines experiment, it's no ...
Tags: Fashion, Music, France, Bliss, Austria, Brooklyn, Paris, Karl Lagerfeld, Lancome, Pacifica, Copacabana, Marie Antoinette, Versailles, Don, Marie, Toner


American History Looms Large in Winston-Salem, NC By John Mariani

Back in 1977 on our 14-week transcontinental honeymoon, as my wife and I approached the outskirts of Winston-Salem, the smell of cured and roasted tobacco drifted through the air and got stronger as we got closer to the city. The aroma was sweet, like the burning of leaves in autumn, and instantly recognizable. In those days Winston-Salem was dominated by the vast holdings of The R. J. Reynolds Tobacco Company, which in the 1940s employed 60 percent of the city's workers, who nickname...
Tags: Travel, America, Salem, North Carolina, Baltimore, Huffington Post, South, John Mariani, Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, Winston Salem, Williamsburg Virginia, Bowman, Louis XV, WINSTON, Reynolda House Museum of American Art, Old Salem