Posts filtered by tags: Maria Popova[x]


 

Social Psychologist Erich Fromm Diagnoses Why People Wear a Mask of Happiness in Modern Society (1977)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4nCzsqKrkhE Modern man still is anxious and tempted to surrender his freedom to dictators of all kinds, or to lose it by transforming himself into a small cog in the machine. —Erich Fromm There are more think pieces published every day than any one person can read about our current moment of social disintegration. But we seem to have lost touch with the insights of social psychology, a field that dominated popular intellectual discourse in the post-war 20t...
Tags: Psychology, Google, College, Current Affairs, Philosophy, Un, Albert Camus, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Erich Fromm, Camus, Durham NC Follow, Maria Popova, Jacobin, Fromm, Frankfurt School


Discover J.R.R. Tolkien’s Little-Known and Hand-Illustrated Children’s Book, Mr. Bliss

His were usually humorous stories, full of magic, and very often, they contained a connection to the children’s lives, because it was primarily for them that he invented them. –Sarah Zama The fact that “much of the inspiration of the Lord of the Rings came from [J.R.R. Tolkien’s] family,” Danielle Burgos writes at Bustle, has become an oft-repeated piece of trivia, especially thanks to such popular treatments of the author’s life as Humphrey Carter’s authorized biography, the Nicholas Hoult-sta...
Tags: Google, Books, College, Bliss, John, Peter Jackson, Middle Earth, Rube Goldberg, Tolkien, Bustle, Michael, Facebook Twitter, Burgos, Nicholas Hoult, J R R Tolkien, Josh Jones


David Byrne Turns His Acclaimed Musical American Utopia into a Picture-Book for Grown-Ups, with Vivid Illustrations by Maira Kalman

Whatever your feelings about the sentimental, lighthearted 1960 Disney film Pollyanna, or the 1913 novel on which it’s based, it’s fair to say that history has pronounced its own judgment, turning the name Pollyanna into a slur against excessive optimism, an epithet reserved for adults who display the guileless, out-of-touch naïveté of children. Pitted against Pollyanna’s effervescence is Aunt Polly, too caught up in her grown-up concerns to recognize, until it’s almost too late, that maybe it’...
Tags: Google, Art, Books, College, Life, Disney, Current Affairs, Broadway, Npr, Spike Lee, Meyer, David Byrne, Trump, Pollyanna, Facebook Twitter, Kalman


Salvador Dalí Gets Surreal with 1950s America: Watch His Appearances on What’s My Line? (1952) and The Mike Wallace Interview (1958)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iXT2E9Ccc8A When was the last time you saw a Surrealist (or even just a surrealist) painter appear on national television? If such a figure did appear on national television today, for that matter, who would know? Perhaps surrealist painting does not, in our time, make the impact it once did, but nor does national television. So imagine what a spectacle it must have been in 1950s America, cradle of the “mass media” as we once knew them, when Salvador Dalí ...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, Television, College, America, Cbs, Salvador Dalí, Dick Cavett, Seoul, Frank Lloyd Wright, Eleanor Roosevelt, Facebook Twitter, Wallace, Mike Wallace, Dali


A Curious Herbal: 500 Beautiful Illustrations of Medicinal Plants Drawn by Elizabeth Blackwell in 1737 (to Save Her Family from Financial Ruin)

Sometimes beautiful things come out of terrible circumstances. This does not justify more terrible circumstances. But as evidence of the resilience, resourcefulness, and creativity of human beings—and more specifically of mothers in dire straits—we offer the following: A Curious Herbal, Elizabeth Blackwell’s finely illustrated, engraved, and colored “herbal,” the term for a “book of plants, describing their appearance, their properties and how they may be used for preparing ointments,” the Brit...
Tags: Google, Art, Books, Science, College, Scotland, History, Emily Dickinson, Elizabeth, Alexander, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, BLACKWELL, Durham NC Follow, Maria Popova, Popova


The Sublime Alice in Wonderland Illustrations of Tove Janssen, Creator of the Globally-Beloved Moomins (1966)

Sometimes describing a classic work of literature as “timeless” draws attention, when we revisit it, to how much it is bound up with the conventions of its time. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland emerged from a very specific time and place, the bank of the Thames in 1862 where Charles Lutwidge Dodgson first composed the tale for Alice Liddell and her sister. The future Lewis Carroll’s future bestseller became one of the most widely adapted and adopted works of literature in history. It never nee...
Tags: Google, Art, Japan, College, Thames, Morocco, Paris, Literature, Finland, Salvador Dalí, Lewis Carroll, Hitler, Alice, Stockholm, Tove Jansson, Tonga


The Sublime Alice in Wonderland Illustrations of Tove Jansson, Creator of the Globally-Beloved Moomins (1966)

Sometimes describing a classic work of literature as “timeless” draws attention, when we revisit it, to how much it is bound up with the conventions of its time. Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland emerged from a very specific time and place, the bank of the Thames in 1862 where Charles Lutwidge Dodgson first composed the tale for Alice Liddell and her sister. The future Lewis Carroll’s future bestseller became one of the most widely adapted and adopted works of literature in history. It never nee...
Tags: Google, Art, Japan, College, Thames, Morocco, Paris, Literature, Finland, Salvador Dalí, Lewis Carroll, Hitler, Alice, Stockholm, Tove Jansson, Tonga


John Coltrane’s “Giant Steps” & Bach’s “Prelude in C Major” Get Turned into Dazzling Musical Animations by an Artist with Synesthesia

Colour is the keyboard, the eyes are the harmonies, the soul is the piano with many strings. The artist is the hand that plays, touching one key or another, to cause vibrations in the soul. —Wassily Kandinsky We may owe the history of modern art to the condition of synesthesia, which causes those who have it to hear colors, see sounds, taste smells, etc. Wassily Kandinsky, who pioneered abstract expressionism in the early 20th century, did so “after having an unusually visual response to a...
Tags: Psychology, Google, Music, Film, College, Neuroscience, Munich, Levy, John Coltrane, Wassily Kandinsky, Vladimir Nabokov, Coltrane, Facebook Twitter, Wagner, Bach, Josh Jones


The All-There-Is.

Maria Popova at Brain Pickings writes about an interesting project: “If one cannot state a matter clearly enough so that even an intelligent twelve-year-old can understand it,” pioneering anthropologist Margaret Mead wrote in the 1979 volume Some Personal Views, “one should remain within the cloistered walls of the university and laboratory until one gets a better grasp of one’s subject matter.” Whether or not theoretical cosmologist Roberto Trotta read Mead, he embodies her unambiguous ethos wi...
Tags: Uncategorized, Linguistics, Maria, Randall Munroe, Trotta, Margaret Mead, Mead, Roberto Trotta, Maria Popova


Hear Readings of Albert Einstein’s “Spicy” Love Letters, and Chilly Divorce Letters, to His First Wife Milena

Beware the fake quotation. They have become so ubiquitous they often appear in books and speeches by politicians and their family members, not that anyone seems to care much. But most of us feel a measure of shame at being duped, as Katharine Rose did when she found herself moved by a letter supposedly written by Albert Einstein to his daughter, Lieserl, “regarding the ‘universal force’ of love.” The letter is a “beautiful read,” and it’s a fake. But many admirers of Einstein were eager ...
Tags: Google, Elsa, Science, College, Albert Einstein, Letters, Einstein, Princeton University, Evelyn, Albert, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Aeon, Ross Anderson, Lieserl, Milena


Hear Readings of Albert Einstein’s Love Letters (and Chilly Divorce Letters) to His First Wife Mileva

Beware the fake quotation. They have become so ubiquitous they often appear in books and speeches by politicians and their family members, not that anyone seems to care much. But most of us feel a measure of shame at being duped, as Katharine Rose did when she found herself moved by a letter supposedly written by Albert Einstein to his daughter, Lieserl, “regarding the ‘universal force’ of love.” The letter is a “beautiful read,” and it’s a fake. But many admirers of Einstein were eager ...
Tags: Google, Elsa, Science, College, Albert Einstein, Letters, Einstein, Princeton University, Evelyn, Albert, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Aeon, Ross Anderson, Lieserl, Durham NC Follow


Hear Readings of Albert Einstein’s Love Letters (and Chilly Divorce Letters) to His First Wife Milena

Beware the fake quotation. They have become so ubiquitous they often appear in books and speeches by politicians and their family members, not that anyone seems to care much. But most of us feel a measure of shame at being duped, as Katharine Rose did when she found herself moved by a letter supposedly written by Albert Einstein to his daughter, Lieserl, “regarding the ‘universal force’ of love.” The letter is a “beautiful read,” and it’s a fake. But many admirers of Einstein were eager ...
Tags: Google, Elsa, Science, College, Albert Einstein, Letters, Einstein, Princeton University, Evelyn, Albert, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Aeon, Ross Anderson, Lieserl, Milena


What I’ve Been Reading (September, 2020)

More books. 1. Three Women by Lisa Taddeo A gripping, hard-to-put down narrative nonfiction close up account of three women and their romantic and sexual desires. Taddeo followed the women for years, inhabiting their worlds and writing about their intimate desires — their lust, their crushes, their actual dalliances and relationships, and in the case of one of the women, a relationship that became the center of a criminal investigation of rape. There are a lot of interesting issues explored in t...
Tags: Books, Sales, Los Angeles, Jia Tolentino, Susan Orlean, Maria Popova, Taddeo, Evan Ratliff, Orlean, LA Public Library, Lisa Taddeo


Explore Dozens of Drawings by Charles Darwin’s Creative Children

Charles Darwin's work on heredity was partly driven by tragic losses in his own family. Darwin had married his first cousin, Emma, and “wondered if his close genetic relation to his wife had had an ill impact on his children’s health, three (of 10) of whom died before the age of 11,” Katherine Harmon writes at Scientific American. (His suspicions, researchers surmise, may have been correct.) He was so concerned about the issue that in 1870, he pressured the government to include questions about...
Tags: Google, Science, College, History, Bbc, Cambridge, Charles Darwin, Francis, Kent, Darwin, George, Emma, Facebook Twitter, Cambridge University Library, Kohn, Horace


Aggression, Panic, Paralysis, Denial

As I talk to leaders about the impact of the current environment on their own lives and those of their employees, friends and families, a common theme is the pervasiveness of a set of counterproductive emotional states: aggression, panic, paralysis, denial. Some people are moving assertively to win competitions or bolster their status, treating every issue as a zero-sum battle. Some people are overwhelmed by fear, struggling to calm themselves and put anxieties in perspective. Some people are...
Tags: Leadership, Stanford, Harvard Business Review, Jim Collins, Stockdale, Els, Christopher Barnes, Stephanie Vozza, Harvard Gazette, Richard Davidson, Antonio Damasio, Gretchen Reynolds, McGreevy, Steve Magness, Jon Brooks, Kelly McGonigal


Science says parents of successful kids have these 24 things in common

Research suggests that parents who manage stress well and maintain a positive mood impact their child's mood in a positive way. MoMo Productions/Getty Images Every parent wants their children to grow up and do amazing things with their lives.While there are several factors that affect a child's development, some of it comes down to parenting. These factors and techniques are a great starting point for every parent.Sign up for our new parenting newsletter Insider Parenting here.Visit Bus...
Tags: England, US, Trends, New York Times, Aspiration, Bonn, University of Pennsylvania, Times, The Washington Post, Stanford University, University Of Michigan, University College London, Northwestern University, University Of North Carolina, University Of Illinois, Ohio State University


Nina Simone Writes an Admiring Letter to Langston Hughes: “Brother, You’ve Got a Fan Now!” (1966)

Nina Simone’s creative and political community meant everything to her, and the many losses she suffered in the 60s sent her deeper into the depression of the last decades of her life. “Langston Hughes, James Baldwin, and Lorraine Hansberry [were] prominent,” writes Malik Gaines at LitHub, “among… socially engaged writers and dramatists” whom she considered not only her “political tutors” but also her heroes and closest friends. She never stopped grieving the loss of Hansberry and Hughes and fr...
Tags: Google, Music, College, France, Chicago, Belgium, Literature, Kansas, Francis, Naacp, Nina Simone, Lawrence, Facebook Twitter, Hughes, Gaines, Morehouse College


Four Ways Good Leaders Become Great Ones

Coach Others into Leadership Roles Great leaders are committed to developing other people as leaders, which often means putting them in positions where they might fail. This also involves encouraging people to step outside their comfort zone and helping them learn from setbacks and mistakes as opposed to punishing them for setbacks and mistakes immediately. [1] As I've written before, Being coached helped me understand that I could have the greatest impact as a leader not by doing more b...
Tags: Leadership, Stanford, Stanford Graduate School of Business, Edbatista, Maria Popova, Adam Kubalica, Allison Felt, Beth Rimbey, Follow Through on Company Values Great


Feeling Safe in an Unsafe World

To talk about feeling safe in an unsafe world, I'm going to use a very reductive model of the universe. This is admittedly oversimplified, but it’s useful as a starting point: A profound psychological need that we have as human beings is a sense of safety. We yearn for safety. To some extent, this is the result of evolution. Our distant ancestors who were more attuned to danger were much more likely to pass their genes down. And as a consequence of thousands of generations of human beings, t...
Tags: Leadership, Stanford, Happiness, Harvard Business Review, Don, Els, Christopher Barnes, Stephanie Vozza, Harvard Gazette, Richard Davidson, Gretchen Reynolds, McGreevy, Steve Magness, Jon Brooks, Jessica Pierce, Kelly McGonigal


Icons of Art Wearing Masks: Frida Kahlo, Mona Lisa, Girl with the Pearl Earring & More

We hear the phrase “unprecedented times” every day now, but the truth is few calamities in human history are more precedented than plagues and pestilences. In Western history, at least, disease epidemics seem always to have been followed by Machiavellian opportunism and cultish conspiracy theories that only made things worse. During the 14th century, almost six hundred years before Naomi Klein defined the shock doctrine, the Black Death “strengthened the power of the state and accelerated the d...
Tags: Google, Amazon, Art, London, College, Current Affairs, Naomi Klein, Facebook Twitter, Defoe, Jill Lepore, Daniel Defoe, Frida Kahlo, Kottke, Blais, Durham NC Follow, Maria Popova


Emma Willard, the First Woman Mapmaker in America, Creates Pioneering Maps of Time to Teach Students about Democracy (Circa 1851)

We all know Marshall McLuhan’s pithy, endlessly quotable line “the medium is the message,” but rarely do we stop to ask which one comes first. The development of communication technologies may genuinely present us with a chicken or egg scenario. After all, only a culture that already prized constant visual stimuli but grossly undervalued physical movement would have invented and adopted television. In Society of the Spectacle, Guy Debord ties the tendency toward passive visual consumption to “c...
Tags: Google, Art, London, Education, College, Time, America, History, United States, Cornell, Joseph, Facebook Twitter, Willard, Josh Jones, Marshall McLuhan, McLuhan


Bill Nye Shows How Face Masks Actually Protect You–and Why You Should Wear Them

Like many Americans of my generation, I grew up having things explained to me by Bill Nye. Flight, magnets, simple machines, volcanoes: there seemed to be nothing he and his team of young lieutenants couldn't break down in a clear, humorous, and wholly non-boring manner. He didn't ask us to come to him, but met us where we already were: watching television. The zenith of the popularity of his PBS series Bill Nye the Science Guy passed a quarter-century ago, and the world has changed a bi...
Tags: Health, Google, Facebook, Science, Instagram, College, America, Nye, Seoul, Bill Nye, Facebook Twitter, Colin Marshall, Maria Popova, 21st Century Los Angeles


Vintage Science Face Masks: Conquer the Pandemic with Science, Courtesy of Maria Popova’s BrainPickings

If you don’t floss or brush your teeth, they will rot and fall out. If you don’t eat fruits and vegetables, you will get scurvy or some other horrible disease. If you don’t use protection… well, you know the rest. These are facts of life we mostly accept if we care about ourselves and others because they are beyond disputing. But the idea of wearing a cloth mask when in public during a viral pandemic spread through droplets from the nose and mouth—a practice endorsed by the CDC, the World Healt...
Tags: Health, Google, Europe, Florida, Science, College, US, Current Affairs, Great Barrier Reef, Facebook Twitter, Flora, Josh Jones, Ernst Haeckel, Durham NC Follow, Maria Popova, Popova


Watch: Poetic Animated Short 'Singularity (after Stephen Hawking)'

"For every atom belonging to me as good belongs to you. Remember?" It's important to often take a break from the chaos of the world and to try to achieve calmness for just a few minutes. Sometimes poetry can help. Singularity (after Stephen Hawking) is a lovely 4-minute animated short film that will give you that momentary relief and rekindle the optimism that is missing nowadays. It's based on a poem by Marie Howe. As Maria Popova explains, it is "a stunning meditation on the interconnected...
Tags: Movies, Animation, Stephen Hawking, Short Film, To Watch, Maria Popova, Marie Howe


This is What Richard Feynman’s PhD Thesis Looks Like: A Video Introduction

Richard Feynman wasn’t just an “ordinary genius.” He was, according to mathematician Mark Kac “in his taxonomy of the two types of geniuses,” a “magician” and “a champion of scientific knowledge so effective and so beloved that he has generated an entire canon of personal mythology,” writes Maria Popova at Brain Pickings. Many a Feynman anecdote comes from Feynman himself, who burnished his popular image with two bestselling autobiographies. His stories about his life in science are extr...
Tags: Google, College, Physics, Albert Einstein, Princeton, Einstein, Feynman, Manhattan Project, Richard Feynman, Facebook Twitter, James Gleick, Josh Jones, Toby, Durham NC Follow, Gleick, Maria Popova


Why Did LEGO Become a Media Empire? Pretty Much Pop: A Culture Podcast #37

http://podtrac.com/pts/redirect.mp3/traffic.libsyn.com/partiallyexaminedlife/PMP_037_3-19-20.mp3 Why has a children's toy become a brand attached to virtually every media type, partnering with the most ubiquitous franchises, and serving as a pastime for many adult hobbyists who will gut you if you call LEGO a "children's toy." Brian Hirt (our resident AFOL, i.e. adult fan of LEGO) talks with co-hosts Erica Spyres and Mark Linsenmayer about creative play vs. following the printed directions, ...
Tags: Google, Podcasts, Minnesota, College, Lego, Hobbies, Brian, Batman, Facebook Twitter, Maria Popova, Erica Spyres, Jesse Hassenger, John Baichtal, Mark Linsenmayer, Pretty Much Pop, Brian Hirt


The Books We Can Use to Rebuild Civilization, Selected by Neal Stephenson, Brian Eno, Tim O’Reilly & More

With so many of us across the world stuck at home, humanity's thoughts have turned to what we'll do when we can resume our normal lives. This time of quarantine, lockdown, and other forms of isolation urges us to reflect, but also to read — and in many cases to read the important books we'd neglected in our pre-coronavirus lives. Quite a few such volumes appear in the Long Now Foundation's "Manual for Civilization," which longtime Open Culture readers will remember us featuring not long after i...
Tags: Google, Books, College, Ray Bradbury, Britain, Winston Churchill, Albert Camus, Brian Eno, Seoul, Neal Stephenson, Leo Tolstoy, Northern Europe, Richard Feynman, Roger Penrose, Rose, Foundation


Janis Joplin’s Last TV Performance & Interview: The Dick Cavett Show (1970)

The best celebrity interviewers have the ability to show us how the stars are not like us at all—not only because of the entourages, wardrobes, and bank accounts, but because of the talent for which we revere them —and also how they’re kind of just like us after all: sharing the same insecurities, fears, doubts, forgetfulness, confusion, etc. They are, that is to say, real human beings. Like no other interviewer on network television before or since, Dick Cavett could draw all of this ou...
Tags: Google, Music, Television, College, George Harrison, Village Voice, Pbs, Janis Joplin, Dick Cavett, Facebook Twitter, Joplin, Cavett, Josh Jones, Howard Smith, Durham NC Follow, Maria Popova


The Peanuts Gang Performs Pink Floyd’s Classic Rock Opera in the Mashup “Charlie Brown vs. The Wall“

YouTuber Garren Lazar has hit upon a brilliant idea—take clips from Charles M. Schulz’s universally beloved Peanuts cartoons and cut them together with universally beloved (more or less) popular anthems like “Bohemian Rhapsody,” “Don’t Stop Believing,” “Freebird,” and “Stayin’ Alive.” The huge emotions of these songs suit the oversized feelings of the comic’s characters, who were, all of them, variations of Schulz himself. As Jeff Kinney writes in his introduction to Chip Kidd’s book, On...
Tags: Google, Music, London, College, Pink Floyd, Charlie Brown, Facebook Twitter, Beckett, Li, Sartre, Lazar, Josh Jones, Ibsen, Schroeder, David Gilmour, Roger Waters


Finding the One Decision That Removes 100 Decisions (or, Why I’m Reading No New Books in 2020)

Donald Knuth, a renowned mathematician and recipient of the Turing Award (considered the Nobel Prize of computer science), retired from using email in 1990.  He issued a public statement on his Stanford faculty page, which I saved to Evernote 1–2 years ago. I think of it often, and my favorite portion is below: “I have been a happy man ever since January 1, 1990, when I no longer had an email address. I’d used email since about 1975, and it seems to me that 15 years of email is plenty...
Tags: Stanford, Evernote, Lifestyle, Jim Collins, Donald, Peter, Tim, Jim, Desmond Tutu, Peter Drucker, Fomo, Donald Knuth, Tim Urban, Maria Popova, Greg McKeown, Writing And Blogging