Posts filtered by tags: Marine Biology[x]


 

Scientists have revived 100-million-year-old marine microbes

Seemingly dead microbes from 100 million years ago spring back to life.The microbes were buried deep beneath the Pacific's "Point Nemo."There's crushing pressure beneath the seabed, but these microbes apparently survived anyway. There is a place in the South Pacific that's as far as you can get from land. This "oceanic pole of inaccessibility" lies beneath the South Pacific Gyre that covers 10 percent of Earth's ocean surface. It's so remote that spacecraft are regularly guided down into its w...
Tags: Energy, Japan, Biology, Nasa, Earth, Discovery, Oceans, Innovation, Evolution, South Pacific, Pacific, Pacific Ocean, Marine Biology, Microbes, University of Rhode Island, South Pacific Gyre


Red Lobster saves blue lobster

According to the Lobster Institute at the University of Maine, there's a one in 2 million chance of catching a blue lobster. The very rare crustaceans have a genetic defect that causes the unusual tint. In Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, Red Lobster employees noticed a blue lobster in their daily delivery and contacted the Akron Zoo. They named it Clawde after the restaurant mascot. From the Akron Beacon Journal: Zoo spokeswoman Elena Bell said a conservation partnership called Seafood Watch run ...
Tags: Post, News, California, Animals, Restaurants, Marine Biology, Ocean Life, University of Maine, Monterey Bay Aquarium, Akron Beacon Journal, Akron Zoo, Man Cave, Lobsters, Lobster Institute, Elena Bell, Cuyahoga Falls Ohio Red Lobster


'A world with no ice': Confronting the horrors of climate change

Climate change is often framed as a debate that has split society down the middle and that requires more evidence before we can act. In reality, 97 percent of scientists agree that it is real and only 3 percent are skeptical. A sticking point for some is the estimated timeline, but as Columbia University professor Philip Kitcher points out, a 4-5 Celsius temperature increase that makes the planet uninhabitable is a disaster no matter when it happens.In this video, 9 experts (including professors...
Tags: Politics, Science, Climate Change, Environment, Future, Sustainability, Policy, Oceans, Innovation, Refugees, Fear, Anthropocene, Natural Disaster, Ecology, Columbia University, Marine Biology


Scientists find 16 'ultra-black' fish species that absorb 99.9% of light

A team of marine biologists used nets to catch 16 species of deep-sea fish that have evolved the ability to be virtually invisible to prey and predators."Ultra-black" skin seems to be an evolutionary adaptation that helps fish camouflage themselves in the deep sea, which is illuminated by bioluminescent organisms.There are likely more, and potentially much darker, ultra-black fish lurking deep in the ocean. A team of marine biologists has discovered 16 species of "ultra-black" fish that absorb ...
Tags: California, Animals, Fish, Oceans, Innovation, Pacific, Marine Biology, Monterey Bay, Osborn, Karen Osborn


The impact of stress on orcas held in captivity

There are currently around 60 orcas living in concrete tanks globally.Orcas' brain structures and behaviors strongly suggest they are smart, emotional, self-aware beings.The study provides compelling evidence that the stresses inherent in captivity do damage to these naturally free-roaming cetaceans. A study, "The harmful effects of captivity and chronic stress on the well-being of orcas (Orcinus orca)" recently published in Journal of Veterinary Behavior is the product of a unique collabora...
Tags: Animals, Neuroscience, Intelligence, Ptsd, Oceans, Innovation, Seaworld, Orcas, Captivity, Emotion, Marine Biology, Marino, Lori Marino, Punta Norte Argentina


Giant whale sharks have teeth on their eyeballs

Japanese researchers discovered that the whale shark has "tiny teeth"—dermal denticles—protecting its eyes from abrasion.They also found the shark is able to retract its eyeball into the eye socket. Their research confirms that this giant fish relies on vision more than previously believed. Cape Cod residents and tourists received a stark warning ahead of the July 4th weekend: beware of great white sharks. This isn't a complete outlier, given that the danger of these sharks has increased in re...
Tags: Japan, Animals, Water, Fish, Oceans, Innovation, Evolution, Marine Biology, Derek, Martin, Twitter Facebook, Okinawa Churashima Research Center, Taketeru Tomita


Whale Sharks Have Eyeballs Covered in Tiny Teeth

Marine biologists from Japan say whale sharks have eyeballs coated in tiny teeth, in a discovery unique to this hulking but gentle aquatic species.Read more...
Tags: Eyes, Japan, Science, Sharks, Teeth, Marine Biology, Whale Sharks


The great white shark has surprising dining habits

A University of Sydney research team found that the great white shark spends an unexpectedly large amount of time feeding close to the sea bed. The group examined the contents in the stomachs of 40 juvenile white sharks and found the remains of a variety of fish species that typically inhabit the sea floor or are buried in the sand. The scientists hope that the information gained from this research will assist conservation and management efforts for the species. In the first-ever study detaili...
Tags: Australia, Animals, Fish, Nature, South Africa, Oceans, Queensland, Innovation, Ecology, Tasmania, Marine Biology, Grainger, University of Sydney, School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Carcharodon, Charles Perkins Centre


Gulf of Mexico ‘Dead Zone’ Will Be Large This Summer, Scientists Predict

The low-oxygen zone can cause harm not just to marine life, but also to those who catch shrimp and fish for their livelihood.
Tags: News, Environment, Global Warming, Fishing, Commercial, Gulf of Mexico, Marine Biology, National Oceanic And Atmospheric Administration


Scientists Record Rarely Heard Sounds Made by Narwhals

Marine biologists, with help from Inuit whalers, have assembled an unprecedented collection of narwhal vocalizations, offering fresh insights into the behaviors of these near-mythical creatures. Read more...
Tags: Science, Whales, Marine Biology, Narwhals, Whale Calls


New fossils reveal first known swimming dinosaur

Spinosaurus has remained an elusive quarry for paleontologists despite its initial discovery more than 100 years ago. A recent study of newly excavated fossils suggests the 40-foot-long therapod swam and hunted in waterways. If future evidence confirms the study's findings, it may change our understanding of the Mesozoic era. Despite being extinct for 65 million years, dinosaurs continue to evolve in our imaginations. Over the past two hundred years of research, these once terrible lizards hav...
Tags: Animals, Water, Earth, Harvard, Nature, Munich, Morocco, New York Times, Innovation, Dinosaurs, Evolution, Marine Biology, Paleontology, Henderson, Biomechanics, Ibrahim


19th-century atlas offers glimpse of North Sea's fish-rich past

In little more than a century, fish stocks in the North Sea declined by 99%.For people living today, a grey and exhausted sea is all they know.O.T. Olsen's Atlas of the North Sea's fish species is a reminder of the richness that once was. "Specialist and magnificent" Ole T. Olsen's 'Piscatorial Atlas' is a masterclass in data presentation, and it doesn't half look bad either. As map guru Tim Bryars says: "The late nineteenth century was the heyday of the thematic atlas, but I have rarely seen o...
Tags: Europe, UK, England, London, Wales, Sustainability, Eu, European Union, Rome, Britain, Ireland, Pollution, Conservation, Innovation, Arctic, West Africa


Incredible Video Shows a Humpback Whale Mother Nursing Her Calf

Nursing is a rather straightforward process for most terrestrial mammals, but the same cannot be said for humpback whales, in which a swimming mother and calf have to carefully coordinate their movements. Unprecedented video taken off the coast of Hawaii shows this delicate process in action.Read more...
Tags: Science, Hawaii, Whales, Animal Behavior, Humpback Whales, Marine Biology


Losing Charismatic Marine Species Could Lead to 'Massive' Ecosystem Collapse

A new study, published on Friday in Science, found that 18 percent of marine megafauna may go extinct within the next century if current trends continue. That includes charismatic ones like whales, sharks, sea turtles, polar bears, and emperor penguins. But it’s not just sad because many of those animals are icons.…Read more...
Tags: Science, Oceans, Ecosystems, Marine Biology


Glowing Deep-Sea Squid Have a Complex Form of Communication, New Evidence Suggests

New research could finally explain how highly social deep-sea squid, with their glowing bodies and bioluminescent flashes, are able to coordinate their actions despite living in near-total blackness.Read more...
Tags: Science, Bioluminescence, Animal Behavior, Marine Biology, Squid, Animal Communication


Bizarre Discovery Reveals Chlamydia-Like Bacteria Beneath the Arctic Seafloor

A plethora of previously unknown bacterial strains related to chlamydia have been found in the unlikeliest of places: sediment under the Arctic seafloor. The discovery is posing new questions about this diverse and durable group of bacteria and how they came to infect humans and other animals.Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Evolution, Marine Biology, Chlamydia, Arctic Seafloor, Chlamydiae


Upside-Down Jellyfish Release Weaponized Goo Packed With Toxic ‘Grenades’

Swimmers in warm coastal regions often exhibit sting-like symptoms despite not coming into direct contact with venomous animals such as jellyfish. Scientists have now pinpointed the cause of these “stinging waters” to a particular jellyfish equipped with its own weaponized mucus.Read more...
Tags: Science, Toxins, Marine Biology, Jellyfish, Venom, Jellyfish Stings


NOAA Offers $20,000 Reward for Info on Sickos Who Stabbed, Shot Two Dolphins in Florida

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is offering a $20,000 reward to anyone who can lead them to whoever murdered two dolphins found dead and beached last week, the Miami Herald reported on Tuesday.Read more...
Tags: Florida, Science, Environment, Dolphins, Conservation, Noaa, Marine Conservation, Marine Science, Marine Biology, National Oceanic And Atmospheric Administration, Miami Herald, Two Dolphins, Marine Ecology


Beaked Whales Use Coordinated Stealth Mode to Evade Killer Orcas

Beaked whales are elite when it comes to their deep diving, but their echolocating clicks expose them to a dangerous predator: orcas. New research shows that groups of beaked whales can reduce predation risk by coordinating deep dives and stealthy ascents.Read more...
Tags: Science, Whales, Animal Behavior, Killer Whales, Orcas, Marine Biology, Beaked Whales


Albatrosses deployed to detect illegal fish vessels out at sea

With their massive wingspans and high speed, albatrosses fly across the seas in search of food. That's why marine ornithologist Henri Weimerskirch of the French National Center for Scientific Research calls the birds the “sentinels of the sea" and is using them to survey the ocean for illegal fishing boats. Apparently, the operators of these vessels frequently turn off their automatic identification system (AIS) that broadcasts who they are and their location. From Katherine J. Wu's article in ...
Tags: Post, Science, News, Marine, Birds, Marine Life, Ocean, Fishing, Marine Biology, PNAS, AIS, National Center for Scientific Research, JJ Harrison CC BY SA, Henri Weimerskirch, Weimerskirch, Katherine J Wu


Newly discovered sharks that walk are the "youngest" shark species on Earth

Some species of sharks have evolved to literally walk along the ocean floor (no, not on land) using their fins as feet. New research Conservation International’s Mark Erdmann and colleagues determined that walking sharks only evolved their unique capability 9 million years ago, "making them the 'youngest' sharks on our planet." Of course, a distinct species usually forms when some members of a species are physically separated from others. So how did that speciation occur in the case of the walk...
Tags: Post, Video, News, Biology, Animals, Genetics, Marine, Oceans, Evolution, Sharks, Papua New Guinea, Marine Biology, Erdmann, Conservation International, Milne Bay, Mark Erdmann


Some shark species have evolved to walk

Living off Australia and New Guinea are at least nine species of walking sharks. Using fins as legs, they prowl coral reefs at low tide. The sharks are small, don't be frightened. None Natural selection takes time. According to the fossil record, sharks, for example, have been essentially the same for hundreds of millions of years. But something's up lately, and by "lately" we mean the last nine million years. Sharks off of Australia have learned to walk. Not Great Whites, fortunately. Small s...
Tags: Australia, Animals, Earth, Discovery, Ocean, Innovation, Evolution, Coral, University of Florida, Biodiversity, Sharks, Marine Biology, Galapagos, New Guinea, Florida Museum of Natural History, Naylor


'Walking Sharks' Confirmed as the Newest Addition to the Shark Family Tree

Sharks have been around for a long time, emerging over 400 million years ago. New research shows that tropical ‘walking sharks’ appeared just 9 million years ago, making them the most recently evolved shark on the planet. Read more...
Tags: Science, Fish, Evolution, Sharks, Marine Biology, Walking Sharks


Newly Sequenced Giant Squid Genome Raises as Many Questions as It Answers

One the most intriguing and mysterious creatures on the planet—the giant squid—has finally had its genome fully sequenced. But while the genome is helping to explain many of its distinguishing features, including its large size and big brain, we still have much to learn about this near-mythical beast.Read more...
Tags: Science, Genetics, Evolution, Marine Biology, Genomes, Giant Squids


Fish Hooks Are Injuring a Shocking Number of Sharks

Observations of sharks swimming off the coast of Tahiti show the alarming degree to which fishing hooks remain attached to these marine predators.Read more...
Tags: Science, Oceans, Animal Welfare, Sharks, Litter, Marine Biology, Tahiti, Save the Sharks


Dead Alligators Dropped to the Bottom of the Sea Make for a Rare and Delicious Meal

An experiment to see how deep-sea creatures might react to the presence of an uncommon food source—alligator carcasses—has resulted in some fascinating new science.Read more...
Tags: Science, Sharks, Alligators, Marine Biology, Deep Sea, Scavengers, Giant Isopods


Consider the axolotl: Our great hope of regeneration?

It has long been understood, and by cultures too various to list, that salamanders have something of the supernatural about them. Their name is thought to derive from an ancient Persian vocable meaning 'fire within', and for at least 2,000 years they were believed to be impervious to flames, or even capable of extinguishing them on contact. Aristotle recorded this exceptional characteristic, as did Leonardo da Vinci. The Talmud advises that smearing salamander blood on your skin will confer infl...
Tags: Health, Science, Biology, Mexico, France, Animals, Daily Mail, Innovation, Peter Pan, Marine Biology, Aristotle, Lorenz, Harvard Medical School, Aztecs, John Dewey, Leonardo da Vinci


First Measurements of a Blue Whale’s Heart Rate Is a Glimpse Into the Biology of Extremes

For the first time ever, marine biologists have recorded the heart rate of a blue whale in the wild—the results of which even surprised the scientists.Read more...
Tags: Science, Whales, Diving, Marine Biology, Blue Whales, Cardiac Function, Whale Hearts, Whale Physiology


First Measurements of a Blue Whale’s Heart Rate Are a Glimpse Into the Biology of Extremes

For the first time ever, marine biologists have recorded the heart rate of a blue whale in the wild—the results of which even surprised the scientists.Read more...
Tags: Science, Whales, Diving, Marine Biology, Blue Whales, Cardiac Function, Whale Hearts, Whale Physiology


Bubble Subs Arise, Opening Eyes to the Deep Sea

Giant plastic spheres, with walls six inches thick or more, are making the depths of the ocean, and its strange denizens, more accessible.
Tags: News, Research, Innovation, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Marine Biology, Deep Sea, Patrick, Robison, Lahey, Dalio, Submarines and Submersibles, Fish and Other Marine Life, Raymond (1949-, Oceans and Seas, Kjell Inge, Your-feed-science