Posts filtered by tags: Marine Biology[x]


 

Upside-Down Jellyfish Release Weaponized Goo Packed With Toxic ‘Grenades’

Swimmers in warm coastal regions often exhibit sting-like symptoms despite not coming into direct contact with venomous animals such as jellyfish. Scientists have now pinpointed the cause of these “stinging waters” to a particular jellyfish equipped with its own weaponized mucus.Read more...
Tags: Science, Toxins, Marine Biology, Jellyfish, Venom, Jellyfish Stings


NOAA Offers $20,000 Reward for Info on Sickos Who Stabbed, Shot Two Dolphins in Florida

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is offering a $20,000 reward to anyone who can lead them to whoever murdered two dolphins found dead and beached last week, the Miami Herald reported on Tuesday.Read more...
Tags: Florida, Science, Environment, Dolphins, Conservation, Noaa, Marine Conservation, Marine Science, Marine Biology, National Oceanic And Atmospheric Administration, Miami Herald, Two Dolphins, Marine Ecology


Beaked Whales Use Coordinated Stealth Mode to Evade Killer Orcas

Beaked whales are elite when it comes to their deep diving, but their echolocating clicks expose them to a dangerous predator: orcas. New research shows that groups of beaked whales can reduce predation risk by coordinating deep dives and stealthy ascents.Read more...
Tags: Science, Whales, Animal Behavior, Killer Whales, Orcas, Marine Biology, Beaked Whales


Albatrosses deployed to detect illegal fish vessels out at sea

With their massive wingspans and high speed, albatrosses fly across the seas in search of food. That's why marine ornithologist Henri Weimerskirch of the French National Center for Scientific Research calls the birds the “sentinels of the sea" and is using them to survey the ocean for illegal fishing boats. Apparently, the operators of these vessels frequently turn off their automatic identification system (AIS) that broadcasts who they are and their location. From Katherine J. Wu's article in ...
Tags: Post, Science, News, Marine, Birds, Marine Life, Ocean, Fishing, Marine Biology, PNAS, AIS, National Center for Scientific Research, JJ Harrison CC BY SA, Henri Weimerskirch, Weimerskirch, Katherine J Wu


Newly discovered sharks that walk are the "youngest" shark species on Earth

Some species of sharks have evolved to literally walk along the ocean floor (no, not on land) using their fins as feet. New research Conservation International’s Mark Erdmann and colleagues determined that walking sharks only evolved their unique capability 9 million years ago, "making them the 'youngest' sharks on our planet." Of course, a distinct species usually forms when some members of a species are physically separated from others. So how did that speciation occur in the case of the walk...
Tags: Post, Video, News, Biology, Animals, Genetics, Marine, Oceans, Evolution, Sharks, Papua New Guinea, Marine Biology, Erdmann, Conservation International, Milne Bay, Mark Erdmann


Some shark species have evolved to walk

Living off Australia and New Guinea are at least nine species of walking sharks. Using fins as legs, they prowl coral reefs at low tide. The sharks are small, don't be frightened. None Natural selection takes time. According to the fossil record, sharks, for example, have been essentially the same for hundreds of millions of years. But something's up lately, and by "lately" we mean the last nine million years. Sharks off of Australia have learned to walk. Not Great Whites, fortunately. Small s...
Tags: Australia, Animals, Earth, Discovery, Ocean, Innovation, Evolution, Coral, University of Florida, Biodiversity, Sharks, Marine Biology, Galapagos, New Guinea, Florida Museum of Natural History, Naylor


'Walking Sharks' Confirmed as the Newest Addition to the Shark Family Tree

Sharks have been around for a long time, emerging over 400 million years ago. New research shows that tropical ‘walking sharks’ appeared just 9 million years ago, making them the most recently evolved shark on the planet. Read more...
Tags: Science, Fish, Evolution, Sharks, Marine Biology, Walking Sharks


Newly Sequenced Giant Squid Genome Raises as Many Questions as It Answers

One the most intriguing and mysterious creatures on the planet—the giant squid—has finally had its genome fully sequenced. But while the genome is helping to explain many of its distinguishing features, including its large size and big brain, we still have much to learn about this near-mythical beast.Read more...
Tags: Science, Genetics, Evolution, Marine Biology, Genomes, Giant Squids


Fish Hooks Are Injuring a Shocking Number of Sharks

Observations of sharks swimming off the coast of Tahiti show the alarming degree to which fishing hooks remain attached to these marine predators.Read more...
Tags: Science, Oceans, Animal Welfare, Sharks, Litter, Marine Biology, Tahiti, Save the Sharks


Dead Alligators Dropped to the Bottom of the Sea Make for a Rare and Delicious Meal

An experiment to see how deep-sea creatures might react to the presence of an uncommon food source—alligator carcasses—has resulted in some fascinating new science.Read more...
Tags: Science, Sharks, Alligators, Marine Biology, Deep Sea, Scavengers, Giant Isopods


Consider the axolotl: Our great hope of regeneration?

It has long been understood, and by cultures too various to list, that salamanders have something of the supernatural about them. Their name is thought to derive from an ancient Persian vocable meaning 'fire within', and for at least 2,000 years they were believed to be impervious to flames, or even capable of extinguishing them on contact. Aristotle recorded this exceptional characteristic, as did Leonardo da Vinci. The Talmud advises that smearing salamander blood on your skin will confer infl...
Tags: Health, Science, Biology, Mexico, France, Animals, Daily Mail, Innovation, Peter Pan, Marine Biology, Aristotle, Lorenz, Harvard Medical School, Aztecs, John Dewey, Leonardo da Vinci


First Measurements of a Blue Whale’s Heart Rate Is a Glimpse Into the Biology of Extremes

For the first time ever, marine biologists have recorded the heart rate of a blue whale in the wild—the results of which even surprised the scientists.Read more...
Tags: Science, Whales, Diving, Marine Biology, Blue Whales, Cardiac Function, Whale Hearts, Whale Physiology


First Measurements of a Blue Whale’s Heart Rate Are a Glimpse Into the Biology of Extremes

For the first time ever, marine biologists have recorded the heart rate of a blue whale in the wild—the results of which even surprised the scientists.Read more...
Tags: Science, Whales, Diving, Marine Biology, Blue Whales, Cardiac Function, Whale Hearts, Whale Physiology


Bubble Subs Arise, Opening Eyes to the Deep Sea

Giant plastic spheres, with walls six inches thick or more, are making the depths of the ocean, and its strange denizens, more accessible.
Tags: News, Research, Innovation, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Marine Biology, Deep Sea, Patrick, Robison, Lahey, Dalio, Submarines and Submersibles, Fish and Other Marine Life, Raymond (1949-, Oceans and Seas, Kjell Inge, Your-feed-science


Scientists Can Now See Stranded Whales From Space

Scientists have begun using satellites that can produce high-resolution imagery to monitor whale strandings from space, according to a new study.Read more...
Tags: Science, Conservation, Chile, Whales, Cetaceans, Satellite Imagery, Marine Biology, Whale Strandings


Creatures of the Deep Are Feeding on a Whale Carcass and You Can Watch It Live

Marine scientists aboard the E/V Nautilus, a research vessel that prowls the high seas in search of oceanic discoveries, have stumbled upon the rare skeletal remains of 16-foot long whale. With bits of flesh still clinging to the bones, the dead whale has attracted an assortment of strange sea critters, including…Read more...
Tags: Science, Whales, Marine Biology, Scavengers, Nautilus, Opportunistic Feeders, Whalefall, Whale Carcass


99-Million-Year-Old Amber Surprisingly Contains Sea Creatures

An incredible 99-million-year-old chunk of amber contains several trapped marine gastropods, including an extinct ammonite, according to a new paper.Read more...
Tags: Science, Marine Biology, Amber, Paleontology, Ammonites


Famous Extinct Sea Creature Somehow Wound Up in 99-Million-Year-Old Tree Resin

An incredible 99-million-year-old chunk of amber contains several trapped marine gastropods, including an extinct ammonite, according to a new paper.Read more...
Tags: Science, Marine Biology, Amber, Paleontology, Ammonites


Some Deep-Sea Fish Can See Color in Near Total Darkness

A newly discovered visual system in deep-sea fish could allow them to discern predators from prey in the low-light conditions found at the bottom of the ocean, new research suggests.Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Fish, Marine Biology, Sight, Darkness


Batwoman, Failed Airlines, and Height Enhancement Scams: Best Gizmodo Stories of the Week

It’s been a busy week for our friends at Facebook: Amid showing a bunch of loser far-right trolls and also Louis Farrakhan the door, kicking off an unhinged Twitter spree by the president, the company announced a confusing pivot towards being a privacy-first platform while also announcing other features designed to…Read more...
Tags: Health, Amazon, Facebook, Wearables, Twitter, Science, Technology, Television, Movies, Air Travel, Medicine, Labor, Environment, Cars, Social Media, Brands


The World's Largest Animal Has a Secret Lingo—Here's What It Sounds Like

Blue whales are impressive creatures. Stretching up to 90 feet long and weighing over 300,000 pounds, these gentle giants often migrate hundreds of miles between their summer feeding grounds and winter breeding grounds. It’s no surprise, then, that the whales are pros at long distance communication, producing calls…Read more...
Tags: Science, Animals, Animal Behavior, Marine Biology, Blue Whales, Acoustic Ecology


Climate change may bring acidic oceans full of jellyfish

Since the beginning of the industrial era, humanity has been pumping out unprecedented levels of CO2 into the atmosphere.A significant portion of this CO2 is sucked back into the ocean, where it reacts with water to produce carbonic acid.Most species fair poorly in the newly acidic ocean. Jellyfish, however, seem to resist ocean acidification more than others. None Human beings don't do well when they try to understand things past a certain scale. When you consider the 7.5 billion people on the ...
Tags: Climate Change, Environment, Earth, Fish, Innovation, Ecology, Biodiversity, Marine Biology, Mediterranean, Northeast US


Around-the-World Expedition Finds 200,000 Species of Viruses in the Oceans

After traveling around the world, sampling the ocean from pole to pole, scientists have uncovered nearly 200,000 populations of marine viruses.Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Oceans, Viruses, Marine Biology, Biochemistry, Ocean Life


Atlantic Shipwreck Graveyard May Be Key Habitat for Imperiled Sharks

Photographs taken by citizen scientist scuba divers show that female sand tiger sharks develop an affinity to certain shipwrecks off the coast of North Carolina—a finding that could prove useful to conservation efforts. Read more...
Tags: Science, Ecology, North Carolina, Sharks, Shipwrecks, Marine Biology, Shipwreck Sharks Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo Doo, Sand Tiger Sharks, Marine Habitats


How industry can benefit from marine diversity

The global economy for products composed of biological materials is likely to grow 3.6% between now and 2025. This in response to serious environmental challenges the world will face. Such products have enormous potential to provide solutions to global challenges like food security, energy production, human health, and waste reduction. This economic growth may strongly benefit from organisms that come from the sea. For example, scientists estimate that marine microorganisms have 100-times higher...
Tags: Books, Featured, Eu, Earth, Microbiology, Biodiversity, Caribbean, Marine Biology, Biotechnology, Microbes, Science & Medicine, FEMS, Aquatic Biology, Biological Research, Femsle, Microbial Biodiversity


Unsettling Video Shows What Happens to a Dead Alligator at the Bottom of the Sea

For the first time ever, scientists placed alligator carcasses at the bottom of the Gulf of Mexico to see which bottom feeders might make a meal of the dead reptiles. The results came as a surprise even to the researchers.Read more...
Tags: Science, Ecology, Gulf of Mexico, Alligators, Marine Biology, Scavengers, Giant Isopods, Food Falls, Food Webs


Unknown Species of Ancient Four-Legged Whale Uncovered in Peru

The discovery of a fossilized, 42-million-year-old, four-legged whale is shedding new light on the evolution and geographical spread of these aquatic mammals.Read more...
Tags: Science, Peru, Evolution, Whales, Marine Biology, Paleontology, Ancient Whales


Climate Change Is Coming for Your Tuna

Climate change seems to threaten everything we hold dear, from coffee to beer  to Tabasco sauce. Now, one of America’s favorite seafood items—tuna—is in hot water, too.Read more...
Tags: America, Fishing, Lifehacks, Tuna, Marine Biology, Tuna Meltdown


Dick-Shaped, Wood-Munching Clams Are More Diverse Than We Thought, Study Finds

Wood-boring clams don’t look like the ones you or I might find steamed with pasta. They’re smaller than a pea, and live exclusively in the deep ocean, tunneling into sunken, waterlogged trees that were swept out to sea long ago to eat the wood. Now, scientists have determined that there are quite a few more groups of…Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Oceans, Biodiversity, Marine Biology, Clams, Animals That Look Like Dicks


Exploding Whales, Poisoned Porpoises: The Gruesome World of Cetacean Autopsies

A dolphin post-mortem may not be everyone’s cup of tea. Many people have a soft spot for the highly intelligent cetaceans, so watching a recently deceased one get comprehensively dissected by tools including a pair of rudimentary garden shears can be tough. Read more...
Tags: Science, Conservation, Ecology, Behavior, Whales, Marine Biology, Whale Strandings, Csip