Posts filtered by tags: Medical Research[x]


 

These new keto diet tortillas are made of 100% cheese

To help keto dieters stay the course, Lotito Foods has developed the Folios cheese wrap, a tortilla made entirely of cheese.These cheese wraps can be part of a healthy diet, but only if eaten in extreme moderation and alongside low-fat, low-salt foods. Research shows that replacing grains and fiber with fat and salts in the long term can be dangerous. None Now they've gone and done it. Keto diet enthusiasts have concocted all manner of unsettling dishes to kick the carbs: coffee with butter inst...
Tags: Health, Cancer, Happiness, Choice, Public Health, Medical Research, Innovation, Agriculture, Disease, Keto, European Society of Cardiology, Bonnie Taub Dix, Taub Dix, Jaha, Human body, Keto Diet


The continued relevance of Phineas Gage

Phineas Gage is considered to be Patient Zero for traumatic brain injury.The story of Gage at the time was that his damaged brain rendered him a different, monstrous person. This wasn't true.Recent studies demonstrate that an injured brain can see an increase in connection in areas associated with touch and learning. Phineas Gage was a railroad foreman in the 19th century. In 1848, while blasting through rock as part of the construction of the Rutland Railroad line in Vermont, Gage set an expl...
Tags: Neuroscience, History, Medical Research, Innovation, Men, South America, Npr, Vermont, Phineas Gage, Gage, Brodmann, Human body, Rutland Railroad, J M Harlow


Scientists are still fascinated by Phineas Gage. Here's why.

Phineas Gage is considered to be Patient Zero for traumatic brain injury.The story of Gage at the time was that his damaged brain rendered him a different, monstrous person. This wasn't true.Recent studies demonstrate that an injured brain can see an increase in connection in areas associated with touch and learning. Phineas Gage was a railroad foreman in the 19th century. In 1848, while blasting through rock as part of the construction of the Rutland Railroad line in Vermont, Gage set an expl...
Tags: Neuroscience, History, Medical Research, Innovation, Men, South America, Npr, Vermont, Phineas Gage, Gage, Brodmann, Human body, Rutland Railroad, J M Harlow


Want to know what mice in labs are saying? Try DeepSqueak.

Mice have a vocabulary of about 20 different phrases. A clever new neural-network-based application reveals what mice used in research say. Spoiler: The conversation changes when a female shows up Rodents are chatty little creatures, and even if mice aren't really hyper-intelligent pan-dimensional beings, as they're portrayed to be in The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy, they do seem to speak in their own very high-pitched way. They have what University of Washington researcher Kevin Coffey ch...
Tags: Biology, Animals, Communication, Medical Research, Language, Innovation, Addiction, Sound, Marx, University of Washington, UW, Coffey, Kevin Coffey, Russell Marx, John Neumaier, DeepSqueak


Sparkling water: Healthy alternative or millennial fad?

Sparkling waters are en vogue as a healthy, refreshing alternative to soft drinks and alcohol.Some claim sparkling water has injurious effects, such as reducing bone mineral density, but research shows such claims are overstated or outright myths.Not all sparkling waters are created equal, though. While some are just as hydrating as plain water, others can be unhealthy if not consumed in moderation. None Sparkling waters are the latest in health chic, providing all the fizzy refreshment of a sof...
Tags: Health, Food, Water, Chemistry, Medical Research, Atlantic, Innovation, Food And Drug Administration, Disease, Starbucks, Illness, Pepsi, Heart Association, Birmingham Alabama, American Dental Association, American Journal of Clinical Nutrition


Half of people who think they have a food allergy do not – study

US study finds some people needlessly avoid foods while others do not have life-saving medicationThe number of adults who think they have a food allergy is almost double the figure who actually have one, research has revealed.While the study was conducted in the US, experts say a similar situation is also seen in other countries, including the UK. The researchers found that many people with an allergy do not have a prescription for potentially life-saving medication, while others might be avoidi...
Tags: Food, UK, Science, US, US news, Medical Research, Allergies


​How AI is learning to convert brain signals into speech

The technique involves training neural networks to associate patterns of brain activity with human speech.Several research teams have managed to get neural networks to "speak" intelligible words.Although similar technology might someday help disabled people regain the power to speak, decoding imagined speech is still far off. None Several research groups have recently made significant progress in using neural networks to convert brain activity into intelligible computer-generated speech, develo...
Tags: Intel, Brain, Disability, Medical Research, Netherlands, Innovation, Machine Learning, Stephen Hawking, SwiftKey, Columbia University, Ai, Chang, University of California San Francisco, Maastricht University, Nima Mesgarani, Mesgarani


Bacon-cancer link: head of UN agency at heart of furore defends its work

IARC’s outgoing director attacks vested interests of critics but admits it could have communicated betterThe head of the UN agency that provoked a massive outcry and some ridicule when it declared that bacon, red meat and glyphosate weedkiller caused cancer has defended its work, denying the announcements were mishandled and insisting on its independence.Its outgoing director, Christopher Wild, fiercely defended the decisions and transparency of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (I...
Tags: Health, Science, Cancer, Society, World news, Medical Research, Un, Cancer Research, IARC, International Agency for Research on Cancer IARC, Christopher Wild


Genetic study of eating disorders could pave way for new treatment

Researchers explore whether genes and early eating habits may trigger disordered eatingResearchers are trying to identify the role genetics and early eating habits play in conditions such as bulimia and anorexia.Eating disorders, which often arise before adulthood, have been increasing in recent years and about a quarter of young people report having symptoms, according to MQ: Transforming Mental Health, a research charity. Continue reading...
Tags: Health, Science, Education, Biology, Children, Society, UK News, Mental Health, Genetics, Eating Disorders, Anorexia, Medical Research, Higher Education, Young People, Bulimia, UCL (University College London


Always tired? Your immune system may be overactive.

Chronic fatigue syndrome affects millions of people worldwide, but scientists still aren't quite sure what causes it.A new study tracked people suffering from Hepatitis C (HCV) as they underwent a treatment course.The results showed that people with overactive immune responses developed chronic fatigue months following the treatment, and that the fatigue persisted even after their immune responses returned to normal. None A new study builds upon previous research showing that an overactive immun...
Tags: Health, London, Sleep, Medical Research, Innovation, University of Oxford, King s College, Sharpe, Human body, Michael Sharpe


Sound could replace lasers in surgery

Scientists announce the ability to simultaneously manipulate individual levitated objects. Using high-frequency sound waves may provide a safer alternative to laser microsurgery. Video of the research looks like a cartoon, but it's all real. For a while now, scientists have presented demonstrations of sound's ability to levitate and move suspended particles. It's pretty cool stuff, and you can find lots of amazing videos showing intriguing patterns made with acoustic waves. Now, though, mechani...
Tags: UK, Design, Spain, Development, Discovery, Medical Research, Innovation, University of Bristol, Sound, Product Design, Drinkwater, Asier Marzo, Bruce Drinkwater, Marzo, Universidad Publica De Navarra, University of Bristol News Optical


The VP882 virus ‘eavesdrops’ on bacteria to kill

When bacteria broadcast their presence, bacteriophages may be listening A stunning discovery of cross-domain communication Research could lead to new, custom- targeted medicines Cholera is caused by a bacterium called Vibrio cholerae, and along and other disease-causing bacteria, it engages in something called "quorum sensing." The word "quorum" in this context carries pretty much the same meaning as it does for human organizations where it's the number of participants required to conduct offic...
Tags: Virus, Discovery, Bacteria, Genetics, Medical Research, Microbiology, Innovation, Npr, Princeton University, Microbes, Justin, Bonnie Bassler, Squibb, Bassler, Justin Silpe, Silpe


Is wasp venom the next healthcare revolution?

Researchers are looking at the venom of wasps, bees, and arachnids to develop life-saving medical therapies.Researchers at MIT created synthetic variants of a peptide found in wasp venom that proved an effective antibiotic.With the "post-antibiotic era" looming, synthetic peptides could provide a way to maintain global health initiatives.Two of the most common phobias are the fear of insects and fear of needles, so it's little wonder that people with apiphobia and spheksophobia aren't keen for ...
Tags: Health, Animals, Mit, Bacteria, Public Health, Medical Research, Innovation, Disease, World Health Organization, Illness, Insects, AMP, AMR, Molecular Biology, Pseudomonas, Timothy Lu


A tax hike on alcohol is the obesity fix Australians need to swallow

The national health impact could be substantial, preventing more than 190,000 cases of diabetes and 16,000 cases of cancerWe don’t often equate the kilojoules we drink in our glass of wine or pint of beer with the weight that accumulates around our middle. But our new study shows increasing the price of alcohol is the foremost value-for-money policy option to prevent obesity in Australia.The study, released today, shows if we increase alcohol taxes by standardising them across different types of...
Tags: Health, Obesity, Australia, Alcohol, Tax, Australia news, Medical Research, Business (Australia


New ‘microneedle patch’ could help heart attack patients regrow tissue

Heart attacks leave scar tissue on the heart, which can reduce the organ's ability to pump blood throughout the body.The microneedle patch aims to deliver therapeutic cells directly to the damaged tissue.It hasn't been tested on humans yet, but the method has shown promising signs in research on animals. None A new 'microneedle patch' could someday help people regain healthy heart muscle tissue after suffering a heart attack.Scientists aim to surgically implant a patch made of plastic and micros...
Tags: Health, Medical Research, Innovation


San Antonio Seeks to Be Known as Silicon Valley of Military Medicine

San Antonio — When it comes to medical technology, what’s good for the military isn’t always good for the private sector.It’s often difficult for military researchers to find investors who will help them privately commercialize the innovations they develop, in part because the duties of military physicians are different than those of civilian doctors. That’s the case when it comes to both treating patients and working with others to develop new healthcare tools. The military may want a product ...
Tags: Startups, Texas, Technology, Medicine, Entrepreneurship, Entrepreneur, Trends, Startup, Tech, People, Commercialization, Medical Research, Venture Capital, Silicon Valley, Fda, Medical Device


Scientists create 10-minute test that can detect cancer anywhere in the body

Australian researchers find 3D nanostructures that are unique to cancer cells.These markers can be identified using technology that may be available on cell phones.Human clinical trials are next for the team. None Australian researchers claim in a new study that they developed a 10-minute test that's capable of finding cancer cells at any location in the body. If further testing achieves the same results, this accomplishment could be a real breakthrough in fighting cancer.The potential for quick...
Tags: Health, Medicine, Dna, Chemistry, Medical Research, Innovation, Disease, Illness, University Of Queensland, Nature Communications, Sina, Johns Hopkins University, Tau, Human body, Trau, Matt Trau


College students choose smartphones over food, researchers find

An experiment out of Buffalo shows that students are willing to put off eating in order to look at their phones. The subjects were willing to pay ever increasing amounts of money to use their phones even as the price of food remained the same.The finding doesn't prove phone addiction is a thing, but it makes it possible.In a turn of events that should surprise nobody, researchers at the University of Buffalo recently discovered that college students would rather go hungry than be separated from ...
Tags: Psychology, Health, Science, Medical Research, Innovation, Addiction, Buffalo, University of Buffalo, Sara O Donnell


First baby born to mother with uterus transplanted from deceased woman

The healthy baby girl was born to a 32-year-old woman in Brazil who received a uterus transplant from a deceased woman.It marks the first successful transplant from a deceased donor. A handful of transplants from living donors have proven successful so far.Deceased donations would greatly expand the pool of potential donors, considering it's relatively difficult to find living donors willing to undergo the procedure. None A baby born to a mother who received a uterus transplanted from a deceased...
Tags: Health, Women, Bbc, Medical Research, Innovation, Brazil, Imperial College London, Cleveland Clinic, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, University of São Paulo, Human body, Dani Ejzenberg, MRKH, Srdjan Saso


Woman gives birth using womb transplanted from dead donor

Patient in Brazil who had been born without uterus gives birth to baby girlA woman in Brazil has successfully given birth after receiving a womb from a dead donor, the first time such a procedure has been successful.While researchers in countries including Sweden and the US have previously succeeded in transplanting wombs from living donors into women who have gone on to give birth, experts said the latest development was a significant advance. Continue reading...
Tags: Health, Science, Sweden, US, Research, Society, World news, Medical Research, Brazil, Fertility problems, Organ Donation


Chinese scientist vanishes after claiming to have made first gene-edited babies

He Jiankui caused international controversy by claiming to have used the CRISPR gene-editing tool to modify the genes of two babies.Some reports suggested he was being held under house arrest, though others say that's inaccurate.It's not unusual for people to disappear in China at the hands of government authorities. None Where is He Jiankui?The scientist who caused international uproar by claiming to have used the CRISPR gene-editing tool to modify the embryos of two babies recently born in Chi...
Tags: Corruption, Science, China, Medical Research, Innovation, Amnesty International, Cctv, Party, Xinjiang, Crispr, South China Morning Post, Lu, Jennifer Doudna, Southern University, Morning Post, Lu Guang


Why are girls hitting puberty earlier? The answer could lie in the medicine cabinet.

American girls have been hitting puberty at earlier ages compared to past decades.Chemicals found in common cosmetic products could be responsible for the changes, according to the results of a nearly 20-year study, which found that boys didn't seem to be affected by the same chemicals.It's still unclear whether these chemicals cause early puberty, but it might be worth avoiding products containing them until the research is conclusive. None It's still something of a mystery why American girls h...
Tags: Health, Parenting, Women, Medical Research, Innovation, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Human body, Breast Cancer Action


Scientists develop 10-minute universal cancer test

Colour-changing fluid reveals likelihood of whether patient’s DNA contains cancerous cellsScientists have developed a universal cancer test that can detect traces of the disease in a patient’s bloodstream.The cheap and simple test uses a colour-changing fluid to reveal the presence of malignant cells anywhere in the body and provides results in less than 10 minutes. Continue reading...
Tags: Health, Science, Cancer, Society, Medical Research, Cancer Research


Ebola drug trials aim to make the disease treatable at home

Leading scientist hopes experiment in DRC could lessen the impact of deadly virusEbola could be transformed from a terrifying disease into something that can be managed at home if drug trials in the Democratic Republic of the Congo are successful, a leading scientist believes.Four experimental drugs are starting to be used as part of a groundbreaking trial under extremely difficult conditions in an outbreak in conflict-ridden eastern DRC. Continue reading...
Tags: Health, Ebola, Science, Africa, Society, World news, Medical Research, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Drc, Global Health


Are we on the cusp of a breakthrough in Ebola treatment?

Leading scientist hopes drug trials in DRC could lessen the impact of deadly virusEbola could be transformed from a terrifying disease into something that can be managed at home if drug trials in the Democratic Republic of the Congo are successful, a leading scientist believes.Four experimental drugs are starting to be used as part of a groundbreaking trial under extremely difficult conditions in an outbreak in conflict-ridden eastern DRC. Continue reading...
Tags: Health, Ebola, Science, Africa, Society, World news, Medical Research, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Drc, Global Health


Hope for male 'pill' breakthrough after huge cash injection

Dundee University researchers receive $1m funding boost from Bill and Melinda Gates FoundationResearchers at a Scottish university hope to make a breakthrough in the long hunt for a male pill, thanks to a grant of more than $900,000 that will allow them to screen thousands of existing drugs to see if they have potential. Related: Male pill could be on horizon as trials yield positive results Continue reading...
Tags: Health, Science, Technology, Education, Scotland, Society, UK News, World news, Medical Research, Higher Education, Bill Gates, Dundee, Contraception and family planning, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Bill, Dundee University


Search for male contraceptive pill gets $1m cash injection

Dundee University researchers receive funding boost from Bill and Melinda Gates FoundationResearchers at a Scottish university hope to make a breakthrough in the long hunt for a male pill, thanks to a grant of more than $900,000 that will allow them to screen thousands of existing drugs to see if they have potential. Related: Male pill could be on horizon as trials yield positive results Continue reading...
Tags: Health, Science, Technology, Education, Scotland, Society, UK News, World news, Medical Research, Higher Education, Bill Gates, Dundee, Contraception and family planning, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Bill, Dundee University


New arthritis treatment uses nanoparticles to take drugs directly into cartilage

Osteoarthritis is a debilitating drug that affects millions of people worldwide, and the only treatments available merely reduce the pain. The new treatment delivers a growth factor into cartilage rather than into the surface of a joint, where it'd be less effective.The treatment represents a "significant step for nanomedicines," one professor said, and it could someday be used to slow age-related osteoarthritis, a leading cause of chronic pain and lost productivity at work. None MIT engineers ...
Tags: Science, Mit, Medical Research, Innovation, IGF, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Nanoscale, Center for Nanomedicine, Kannan Rangaramanujam, Brett Geiger


Scientist in China defends human embryo gene editing

He Jiankui uses Hong Kong summit to reply to critics of his Crispr-Cas9 trials altering baby DNA for HIV resistanceThe Chinese scientist who claims to have altered the DNA of twin girls before birth – without going through the usual scientific channels – said he was proud of his work, and claimed another woman enrolled in his trial was pregnant with a similarly modified baby.The scientist, He Jiankui, spoke to hundreds of colleagues and journalists on Wednesday at the International Human Genome ...
Tags: Hong Kong, Science, Biology, China, World news, Medical Research, Asia Pacific, Ethics, Ivf, Cloning, Aids and HIV, Academic experts, Gene Editing, University of Hong Kong Continue, Jiankui


CRISPR co-inventor responds to claim of first gene-edited babies

On Sunday, a Chinese scientist claimed the world's first genetically edited babies had been born in China.The scientist claims to have used gene-editing technology on the babies' embryos.Dr. Doudna said scientists should confine "the use of gene editing in human embryos to cases where a clear unmet medical need exists." None On Sunday, a scientist stirred major controversy by claiming that the world's first gene-edited babies were recently born in China. The scientist, Jiankui He, claims to have...
Tags: Biology, China, Medical Research, Innovation, UC Berkeley, Crispr, National Academy of Sciences, Jennifer Doudna, Doudna, Human body, Jiankui