Posts filtered by tags: Medical Research[x]


 

Are genetic tests useful to predict cancer?

The health secretary’s call for tests to be rolled out on NHS was met with controversyThe health secretary, Matt Hancock, this week shared his shock at discovering that he is at greater than average risk for prostate cancer, despite having no family history of the disease.The revelation came after he took a predictive genetic test that assesses risk for 16 common diseases, including coronary artery disease, type 2 diabetes, asthma and breast and prostate cancers. Continue reading...
Tags: Cancer, UK news, Matt Hancock, NHS, Health, Cancer research, Medical research, Genetics, Science


Mini-brains attach to spinal cord and twitch muscles

Researchers find a new and inexpensive way to keep organoids growing for a year. Axons from the study's organoids attached themselves to embryonic mouse spinal cord cells. The mini-brains took control of muscles connected to the spinal cords. None Scientists have been experimenting with organoids — mini-brains — for a while now, but research just published in Nature Neuroscience takes things up another notch. Three things distinguish the lentil-sized mini-brains developed by Madeline Lancaster...
Tags: Neuroscience, Discovery, Brain, Medical Research, Innovation, Cambridge, Synthetic Biology, Biomechanics, Nature Neuroscience, Medical Research Council, Madeline Lancaster, Cognitive Science, Organoid, Mini-brain, ALI CO


Key to saving lives of newborns lies in half a teaspoon of blood, study claims

Research reveals striking changes in babies’ immune development that could form the basis for lifesaving vaccinesA groundbreaking study has claimed that the key to saving the lives of newborns is found in just half a teaspoon of blood.Research has revealed dramatic changes in the immune systems of newborns, which scientists say could transform our understanding of disease in babies. Continue reading...
Tags: Health, Science, Medical Research, Global development, Vaccines and immunisation, Immunology, Global Health


Scientists grow 'mini-brain on the move' that can contract muscle

Cambridge researchers grew ‘organoid’ that spontaneously connected to spinal cordScientists have grown a miniature brain in a dish with a spinal cord and muscles attached, an advance that promises to accelerate the study of conditions such as motor neurone disease.The lentil-sized grey blob of human brain cells were seen to spontaneously send out tendril-like connections to link up with the spinal cord and muscle tissue, which was taken from a mouse. The muscles were then seen to visibly contrac...
Tags: Health, Science, Biology, Neuroscience, Society, Mental Health, Genetics, Schizophrenia, Medical Research, Stem Cells, Cambridge, Epilepsy, University of Cambridge, Motor Neurone Disease


Horseshoe crabs are captured for their blue blood. That practice will soon be over.

Horseshoe crabs' blue blood is so valuable that a quart of it can be sold for $15,000.This is because it contains a molecule that is crucial to the medical research community.Today, however, new innovations have resulted in a synthetic substitute that may end the practice of farming horseshoe crabs for their blood. None One of humanity's strangest and most macabre activities is slowly coming to an end, a trend that every horseshoe crab should celebrate. For the time being, however, hundreds of t...
Tags: Medicine, US, Chemistry, Medical Research, Atlantic, Innovation, Ecology, Fda, The Food and Drug Administration, Lonza Group Pharmaceutical, Hyglos GmbH, rFC


Horseshoe crabs are drained for their blue blood. That practice will soon be over.

Horseshoe crabs' blue blood is so valuable that a quart of it can be sold for $15,000.This is because it contains a molecule that is crucial to the medical research community.Today, however, new innovations have resulted in a synthetic substitute that may end the practice of farming horseshoe crabs for their blood. None One of humanity's strangest and most macabre activities is slowly coming to an end, a trend that every horseshoe crab should celebrate. For the time being, however, hundreds of t...
Tags: Medicine, US, Chemistry, Medical Research, Atlantic, Innovation, Ecology, Fda, The Food and Drug Administration, Lonza Group Pharmaceutical, Hyglos GmbH, rFC


Actors show altered brain activity when in character, study finds

Method actors employ an intensive approach to acting that involves staying in character for long periods of time.The recent study asked trained method actors a variety of hypothetical questions under four different scenarios.The results showed changes in brain activity depending on whether actors were in and out of character, including alterations to activity in the prefontal cortex — a key region in terms of self-awareness. None Method actors famously blur the lines between their everyday perso...
Tags: Psychology, Science, Brain, Medical Research, Innovation, Al Pacino, Romeo, Larry King, University Of Liverpool, Centre for Research, Philip Davis


Brazilian scientists produce mini-brains with eyes

Mini-brains, or "neural organoids," are at the cutting edge of medical research. This is the first one that's started developing eyes. Stem cells are key to the growing of organoids of various body parts. None Organoids are tiny, self-organized tissue cultures. They're comprised of stem cells that can be programmed to replicate naturally occurring tissue. Using them, scientists can grow mini organs of various types for research purposes, and, not surprisingly, there's a lot of interest in min...
Tags: Neuroscience, Brain, Medical Research, Microbiology, Innovation, Synthetic Biology, Bioethics, Zika, Sight, D Or Institute for Research and Education IDOR, Organoid, Mini-brain, IDOR, Stevens K Rehen Incomplete


Is the keto diet safe for everyone? Probably not.

The keto diet might be a fad diet, but it's unique in that involves putting the body into an alternate and natural metabolic state.However, the diet likely isn't safe for everyone, particularly when it's implemented poorly.Children, pregnant women, breastfeeding women and those at risk for heart disease should understand the risks of the keto diet before experimenting with it. None People experiment with all kinds of crazy, unhealthy diets to lose weight: eating cotton balls soaked in orange jui...
Tags: Health, Food, New York City, Medical Research, Innovation, Philadelphia, Edwards, Mount Sinai Hospital, American Pregnancy Association, Amber Edwards, Human body, Suzanne Steinbaum, Charles Seltzer, Laura Schoenfeld, Romper Elizabeth Ward, Jessica McGee


Getting fit in middle age as beneficial as starting early – study

Increasing activity in 40s and 50s lowers risk of early death just like staying fit from teensGetting active in midlife could be as good for you as starting young when it comes to reducing the risk of an early death, researchers have suggested.But experts say the study, which looked at people’s patterns of exercise as they aged and their subsequent death records, also shows it does not do to rest on your laurels: the benefits fade once exercise declines. Continue reading...
Tags: Health, Science, Fitness, Life and style, Society, Medical Research, Health & wellbeing


Vaccines in no way cause autism, massive new study finds

A massive new study finds absolutely no link between MMR vaccination and autism. Some question the expenditure of yet more research money on convincing conspiracy theorists. There are already 206 measles cases this year in the U.S., and the disease is up by 30% globally, despite previous near-eradication. None Measles were eliminated in the U.S. in 2000. Those were the days. Now it's back, with 206 cases in 11 states already confirmed this year. Measles' return is due to an increasing number ...
Tags: Facebook, UK, Washington Post, Public Health, Autism, Medical Research, Innovation, Protests, MMR, Reddit, Disease, World Health Organization, Denmark, Vaccinations, Health Care, U S Senate


Massive new study debunks a vaccination-autism link

A massive new study finds absolutely no link between MMR vaccination and autism. Some question the expenditure of yet more research money on convincing conspiracy theorists. There are already 206 measles cases this year in the U.S., and the disease is up by 30% globally, despite previous near-eradication. None Measles were eliminated in the U.S. in 2000. Those were the days. Now it's back, with 206 cases in 11 states already confirmed this year. Measles' return is due to an increasing number ...
Tags: Facebook, UK, Washington Post, Public Health, Autism, Medical Research, Innovation, Protests, MMR, Reddit, Disease, World Health Organization, Denmark, Vaccinations, Health Care, U S Senate


For second time ever a patient has been cured of HIV, scientists report

The New York Times reports that a team of scientists plan to announce tomorrow that a patient in London has been effectively cured of HIV.The cure reportedly was the result of a bone-marrow transplant that came with a genetic mutation that naturally blocks HIV from spreading throughout the body.This approach isn't quite practical to implement on a large scale, but the knowledge gained from it will likely help scientists develop more scalable approaches. None In 2007, Timothy Ray Brown became the...
Tags: Science, London, China, Berlin, Aids, Hiv, Medical Research, New York Times, Netherlands, Innovation, Times, Seattle, Anthony Fauci, University College London, The Associated Press, Hodgkin


London patient becomes second adult to be cleared of HIV

Tests show no trace of man’s previous infection after stem cells donation A man in Britain has become the second known adult worldwide to be cleared of HIV after he received a bone marrow transplant from a virus-resistant donor, his doctors said.Almost three years after receiving bone marrow stem cells from a donor with a rare genetic mutation that resists HIV infection – and more than 18 months after he came off antiretroviral drugs – highly sensitive tests still show no trace of the man’s prev...
Tags: Health, Science, London, Society, UK News, Medical Research, Britain, Aids and HIV


London patient becomes second man to be cleared of Aids virus

Tests show no trace of the man’s previous HIV infection after stem cells donation A man in Britain has become the second known adult worldwide to be cleared of the virus after he received a bone marrow transplant from an HIV-resistant donor, his doctors said.Almost three years after receiving bone marrow stem cells from a donor with a rare genetic mutation that resists HIV infection – and more than 18 months after he came off antiretroviral drugs – highly sensitive tests still show no trace of t...
Tags: Health, Science, London, Society, UK News, Medical Research, Britain, Aids and HIV


Tests on London patient offer hope of HIV 'cure'

Man becomes second person in world to be cleared of virus after stem cell donationA man in Britain has become the second known adult worldwide to be cleared of HIV after he received a bone marrow transplant from a virus-resistant donor, his doctors said.Almost three years after receiving bone marrow stem cells from a donor with a rare genetic mutation that resists HIV infection – and more than 18 months after he came off antiretroviral drugs – highly sensitive tests still show no trace of the ma...
Tags: Health, Science, London, Society, UK News, Medical Research, Britain, Aids and HIV


Does our immune system hold the key to beating Alzheimer’s disease?

Incurable and increasingly prevalent, Alzheimer’s has long puzzled the research community. Now scientists believe the human body may be the best line of defenceHalf a million people in the UK are living with Alzheimer’s disease, the most common form of dementia. And while the risks generally increase with age, thousands are afflicted under the age of 65. Inheritable genetic conditions can lead to familial Alzheimer’s, which can afflict people as young as 30.There is no known cure. Some medicatio...
Tags: Health, UK, Science, Society, UK News, Medical Research, Alzheimer's, Vaccines and immunisation, Immunology


What if you were immune to chronic pain? Vaccines could make it happen.

Alzheimer's disease and unintentional deaths (like opioid overdoses and suicides) have been driving down U.S. longevity statistics for three consecutive years – a trend not seen since the Spanish flu pandemic. Our current approach to treating chronic pain is drug-based, but a vaccine-based approach can cut addiction out of the equation. You can vaccinate against pain! Scientists are developing vaccines for migraines and sciatica, which will lower the need for opioids, be cheaper, and make dr...
Tags: Health, Science, Medicine, Drugs, Future, Brain, Medical Research, Innovation, Addiction, Alzheimer's, Mind, Vaccines, Narcotics


Nearly half of all children with cancer go undiagnosed and untreated

Many cases in Asia and Africa are being missed and leading to children ‘dying at home’Almost half of children with cancer are going undiagnosed and untreated, according to a new global study.The research suggests that the situation depends on location: while only 3% of childhood cancer cases in western Europe and north America are thought to have been missed in 2015, the proportion rose to an estimated 49% in south Asia and 57% in western Africa. Continue reading...
Tags: Health, Asia, Europe, Science, Children, Cancer, Africa, America, Society, World news, Medical Research, Cancer Research


Keto diet: 5 of the biggest food plan mistakes

The high-fat, low-carb keto diet involves putting your body into a natural metabolic state called ketosis.When done responsibly, the keto diet can yield a wide range of benefits, most notably weight loss.Some people have less luck than others on the keto diet because they make a few common mistakes, including failing to drink enough water, eating too many unhealthy fats, and not realizing which foods might kick them out of ketosis. None The gist of the keto diet is simple: Eat less carbs and mor...
Tags: Health, Food, Medical Research, Innovation, Heart Association, Bailey, Keto, Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Melissa Bailey, Human body, Carol Johnston, ASU Now Glycogen, Kristen Kizer, Houston Methodist Medical Center


Harvard: Men who can do 40 pushups have a 'significantly' lower risk of cardiovascular disease

Men who can perform 40 pushups in one minute are 96 percent less likely to have cardiovascular disease than those who do less than 10. The Harvard study focused on over 1,100 firefighters with a median age of 39.The exact results might not be applicable to men of other age groups or to women, researchers warn. None Quantifying workouts feeds our love for both math and goal-setting. While elite powerlifters aim at incremental increases that will award them the coveted one repetition at maximum w...
Tags: Health, Aging, Harvard, Medical Research, Innovation, Men, Physiology, Derek, Harvard T H Chan School of Public Health, Department of Environmental Health, Hiss, Stefanos Kales, Human body, Justin Yang


One-time, universal flu vaccine may be on horizon, Australian researchers say

Scientists have discovered immune cells that can fight all different kinds of the flu virus.Depending on a patient's immune system, one shot could cover someone for 10 years or potentially life.This breakthrough could save thousands worldwide.A new treatment shows promise in becoming a one-time flu vaccine. In a recent study conducted by Professor Katherine Kedzierska at the University of Melbourne, researchers discovered a set of immune cells that have the ability to fight off all forms of th...
Tags: Health, Science, Medicine, Cdc, Medical Research, Innovation, Vaccination, Influenza, Sickness, University of Melbourne, Katherine Kedzierska, Kedzierska


CRISPR-edited babies born in China may have enhanced brain functions

In November, Chinese scientist He Jiankui reported that he'd used the CRISPR tool to edit the embryos of two girls.He deleted a gene called CCR5, which allows humans to contract HIV, the virus which causes AIDS.In addition to blocking AIDS, deleting this gene might also have positive effects on memory and cognition. Still, virtually all scientists say we're not ready to use gene-editing technology on babies. None The controversial decision to genetically edit the embryos of two girls born in Chi...
Tags: Science, China, Genetics, Medical Research, Innovation, Philosophy, Morality, UC Berkeley, Crispr, National Academy of Sciences, Silva, Jennifer Doudna, University of California Los Angeles, MIT Technology Review, Doudna, He Jiankui


The doctor who prescribed the meaning of life to his patients

Not having a meaningful life can be dreadful, and one psychologist thought it was the root cause of many neuroses.His ideas became Logotherapy, which focuses on the need for a meaningful life and has shown success in many areas.Many studies agree that leading a meaningful life has tangible benefits and lacking meaning can lead to problems. Many people struggle with the question of what the meaning of life their life is. The dread that can accompany meaninglessness is well known, but where to tur...
Tags: Psychology, Mental Health, Depression, Creativity, Medical Research, Innovation, Mind, CBT, Rollo May, Frankl, Viktor Frankl, Logotherapy


Scientists map great white shark genome, revealing clues about cancer and healing wounds

Scientists have mapped the entire genome of the great white shark.The team found genetic adaptations that seem to help the fish preserve and repair its genome, clues that may help us better understand why sharks rarely get cancer.The team also identified several gene pathways that might also help explain the fish's extraordinary wound-healing capabilities. None An international team of scientists has decoded the entire genome of the great white shark, an achievement that could help us better fig...
Tags: Animals, Cancer, Fish, Medical Research, Innovation, Marine Biology, National Academy of Sciences, NSU, Stanhope, Mahmood Shivji, Save Our Seas Foundation Shark Research Center, Michael Stanhope, GHRI


Scientists are creating music to unlock your brain’s potential

Instead of prescribing medications to kids with ADD or ADHD, Clark and his team at Brain.fm are looking to music as another option for treatment. Through a grant from the National Science Foundation, the company is developing music that features "neural-phase locking" — a combination of different principles that create specific characteristics in the brain, such as increased concentration or relaxation. As long as they're listening to the music, the neural phase-locking aspect of Brain.fm's tun...
Tags: Health, Productivity, Technology, Startup, Neuroscience, Brain, Medical Research, Innovation, Mind, National Science Foundation, Clark, Dan Clark


'Self is not entirely lost in dementia,' argues new review

In the past when scholars have reflected on the psychological impact of dementia they have frequently referred to the loss of the "self" in dramatic and devastating terms, using language such as the "unbecoming of the self" or the "disintegration" of the self. In a new review released as a preprint at PsyArXiv, an international team of psychologists led by Muireann Irish at the University of Sydney challenge this bleak picture which they attribute to the common, but mistaken, assumption "that wi...
Tags: Medicine, Identity, Memory, Brain, Medical Research, Innovation, Dementia, Alzheimer's, BPS Research Digest, Alzheimer, Frontotemporal Dementia, Muireann Irish at the University of Sydney, Cherie Strikwerda Brown, Semantic Dementia, Frontotemporal Dementia Overall, John Zeisel


"The self is not entirely lost in dementia," argues new review

In the past when scholars have reflected on the psychological impact of dementia they have frequently referred to the loss of the "self" in dramatic and devastating terms, using language such as the "unbecoming of the self" or the "disintegration" of the self. In a new review released as a preprint at PsyArXiv, an international team of psychologists led by Muireann Irish at the University of Sydney challenge this bleak picture which they attribute to the common, but mistaken, assumption "that wi...
Tags: Medicine, Identity, Memory, Brain, Medical Research, Innovation, Dementia, Alzheimer's, BPS Research Digest, Alzheimer, Frontotemporal Dementia, Muireann Irish at the University of Sydney, Cherie Strikwerda Brown, Semantic Dementia, Frontotemporal Dementia Overall, John Zeisel


New drug raises hopes of reversing memory loss in old age

Toronto researchers believe the drug can also help those with depression, schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s An experimental drug that bolsters ailing brain cells has raised hopes of a treatment for memory loss, poor decision making and other mental impairments that often strike in old age.The drug could be taken as a daily pill by over-55s if clinical trials, which are expected to start within two years, show that the medicine is safe and effective at preventing memory lapses. Continue reading...
Tags: Health, Science, Drugs, Memory, Americas, Toronto, Neuroscience, Society, World news, Mental Health, Depression, Schizophrenia, Medical Research, Canada, Alzheimer's, Ageing


Stimulating this part of the brain causes ‘uncontrollable urge to laugh’

In a study of epilepsy patients undergoing electrical stimulation brain mapping, scientists discovered that the stimulation of the cingulum bundle reliably produced laughter, smiles and calm feelings.The findings could someday help scientists develop better treatments for anxiety, depression and chronic pain.One obstacle preventing this kind of treatment from becoming accessible is that it requires invasive surgery, though improved technology could someday change that. None Electrically stimulat...
Tags: Happiness, Mental Health, Anxiety, Medical Research, Innovation, National Institutes of Health, Nih, Human body, Jon T Willie