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Trial of Torrance herbalist charged with child abuse in death of Harbor Gateway teen goes to jurors

A self-proclaimed herbalist brainwashed the parents of a Harbor Gateway teenager with Type-1 Diabetes to believe that insulin being prescribed to him was poison and doctors were evil, instead advising them to have the boy to take his herbal remedies, a prosecutor said during closing arguments in a case against Tim Morrow on Tuesday, Feb. 19. But Morrow’s defense attorney countered by telling jurors the prosecution had not proven its case and that it was the responsibility of the 13-year-old boy’...
Tags: Crime, News, Medicine, La, Sport, Soccer, Public Safety, Daniel, Torrance, Los Angeles Superior Court, Edgar, Lopez, Morrow, Edgar Lopez, Tim Morrow, Matz


Kaiser Permanente’s New Medical School Will Be Free for Its First 5 Graduating Classes

Kaiser joins other medical schools in offering free tuition to attract students
Tags: News, Medicine, Kaiser Permanente, Uncategorized, Kaiser, Onetime, Healthytime


Gene Therapy for the Most Common Form of Blindness Gets Its First Human Test

An 80-year-old woman from the United Kingdom is the first patient to undergo gene therapy to treat age-related macular degeneration—the most common cause of sight loss in the world. Read more...
Tags: Science, Medicine, Genetics, United Kingdom, Gene Therapy, Blindness, Age Related Macular Degeneration


Pasadena-based Kaiser Permanente School of Medicine receives preliminary accreditation, will accept students this year

PASADENA — The Kaiser Permanente School of Medicine announced Tuesday that it has received preliminary accreditation from the Liaison Committee on Medical Education and will begin accepting applications from prospective students in June 2019 for admission to the school’s first class in the summer of 2020. Kaiser also announced that it will waive all tuition for the full four years of school for its first five classes at the Pasadena campus. “We’ve had the opportunity to build a medical school...
Tags: Business, News, Medicine, Kaiser Permanente, America, Los Angeles, Sport, Hospitals, Soccer, Kaiser, Pasadena, Bernard J Tyson, School of Medicine, Kaiser Foundation Health Plan, Top Stories LADN, Top Stories OCR


9 ways to add more houseplants to your home

Adding plants to your living space is an easy way to add beauty and character to your home. But aesthetics aren’t the only benefit of indoor gardening as houseplants can make your home’s air healthier  and also make you happier . No to mention, you can easily grow useful plants and herbs that work great for healthy cooking and as natural medicines . Even if you weren’t born with a green thumb or have a tiny space to work with, there are ways to go green with your decor. If you choose the ...
Tags: Home, Design, Medicine, Etsy, Features, Things To Do, House, Plants, Herbs, Kitchen Garden, Decor, Indoor Plants, Houseplants, Hanging Plants, Wire Grid Jazz, wall Plant Corner If


"The self is not entirely lost in dementia," argues new review

In the past when scholars have reflected on the psychological impact of dementia they have frequently referred to the loss of the "self" in dramatic and devastating terms, using language such as the "unbecoming of the self" or the "disintegration" of the self. In a new review released as a preprint at PsyArXiv, an international team of psychologists led by Muireann Irish at the University of Sydney challenge this bleak picture which they attribute to the common, but mistaken, assumption "that wi...
Tags: Medicine, Identity, Memory, Brain, Medical Research, Innovation, Dementia, Alzheimer's, BPS Research Digest, Alzheimer, Frontotemporal Dementia, Muireann Irish at the University of Sydney, Cherie Strikwerda Brown, Semantic Dementia, Frontotemporal Dementia Overall, John Zeisel


'Self is not entirely lost in dementia,' argues new review

In the past when scholars have reflected on the psychological impact of dementia they have frequently referred to the loss of the "self" in dramatic and devastating terms, using language such as the "unbecoming of the self" or the "disintegration" of the self. In a new review released as a preprint at PsyArXiv, an international team of psychologists led by Muireann Irish at the University of Sydney challenge this bleak picture which they attribute to the common, but mistaken, assumption "that wi...
Tags: Medicine, Identity, Memory, Brain, Medical Research, Innovation, Dementia, Alzheimer's, BPS Research Digest, Alzheimer, Frontotemporal Dementia, Muireann Irish at the University of Sydney, Cherie Strikwerda Brown, Semantic Dementia, Frontotemporal Dementia Overall, John Zeisel


5 of the worst keto diet side effects

In addition to weight loss, there are a few well-known side effects of the keto diet, some of which can be unpleasant.Some side effects of the keto diet are bound to occur, though others only happen when the diet is implemented poorly.The keto diet doesn't have to lead to a host of negative side effects, but anyone considering undertaking the diet over the long term should be especially careful. None The keto diet is often called a fad diet. Make no mistake: it is. But unlike other trendy diets,...
Tags: Health, Science, Diet, Medicine, Los Angeles, Innovation, Clark, Keto, Human body, Edwina Clark, Nancy Rahnama, Scott Keatley, Kim Yawitz


Special Operations

It started out as a boring day. Sitting in a makeshift hospital situated in an austere and hostile environment at an undisclosed location, Maj. Alexander Le and his fellow Special Operations Surgical Team, or SOST, members welcomed the monotony. After all, a busy day for the members of the surgical team would mean the worst possible day for someone else. Unfortunately, this calm day would soon be met with chaos. jQuery(document).rea...
Tags: Medicine, Iraq, Medical, Training, People, Afghanistan, Trauma, Military, Army, Las Vegas, Birmingham, Air Force, Uab, Miller, University Of Alabama, Le


Medivis has launched its augmented reality platform for surgical planning

After two years of development, Medivis, a New York-based company developing augmented reality data integration and visualization tools for surgeons, is bringing its first product to market. The company was founded by Osamah Choudhry and Christopher Morley who met as senior residents at NYU Medical Center. Initially a side-project, the two residents roped in some engineers to help develop their first prototypes and after a stint in NYU’s Summer Launchpad program the two decided to launch the com...
Tags: TC, New York, Medicine, Microsoft, Tech, Pennsylvania, Machine Learning, Dell, Augmented Reality, University of Pennsylvania, Computer Vision, Chris, Initialized Capital, Mixed Reality, General Partner, New York University


New "swallowable needles" could deliver insulin as a pill

Insulin breaks down in the stomach, so diabetics haven't had the option of taking insulin in a pill.A new device whose design is inspired by tortoises can be swallowed and inject diabetics with insulin from the inside.Though it's still a prototype, the device is an exciting development for delivering insulin and other drugs. None No matter the delivery mechanism, consistently getting a dose of insulin is inconvenient, complicated, and non-negotiable. The unfortunate nature of insulin is that it ...
Tags: Health, Technology, Medicine, Innovation, Health Care, Illness, Soma, Biotech


Hmm, This Anti-Vaccination Rally Amid a Major Measles Outbreak Is a Little Too on the Nose

Amid a measles outbreak in Washington state that officials have confirmed has spread to at least 51 people and suspect to have spread to over a dozen others, hundreds of people showed up to a rally on Friday to demand the right to keep exposing their kids to the possibility of contracting easily prevented, potentially…Read more...
Tags: Health, Science, Medicine, Washington, MMR, Outbreak, Vaccines, Measles, Antivaxxers, Vaccinate Your Children, Mmr Vaccine, Anti Vaccination Rally Amid


Johnson & Johnson Will Start Showing Drug Prices in Its TV Ads

Anyone who pays close attention to television drug commercials—perhaps because they enjoy the ominous, rapid muttering of side effects—will soon notice something new. On Thursday, Johnson & Johnson announced it would begin showing drug prices alongside photogenic actors doing mundane things in its televised ads next…Read more...
Tags: Science, Medicine, Health Care, Johnson, Johnson Johnson, Drug Prices


Syringe-pill injects you on the inside

Biomedical engineers prototyped a pill that integrates a syringe to inject insulin into the floor of the stomach. From Science News: The shape is designed to guide the device to rest, cap down, on the floor of the stomach. There, it sticks a needle tip composed almost entirely of insulin a few millimeters into the mucus membrane lining the stomach. Once the insulin needle tip dissolves, the device passes through the rest of the digestive system. Thanks to the dearth of sharp pain receptors ...
Tags: Post, News, Medicine, Boston, Medical, Mit, Diabetes, Biomedical, Brigham and Women 's Hospital, Giovanni Traverso


Study Says Over 400 Organ Transplant Studies Using Chinese Data Should Be Retracted Over Ethical Concerns

A new study published in BMJ Open has called for over 400 scientific papers on the subject of organ transplantation to be retracted because they did not comply with international ethical standards designed to ensure the organ donors freely consented, the Guardian reported this week.Read more...
Tags: Health, Science, Prison, Medicine, China, Ethics, Guardian, Medical Ethics, Organ Transplants


Healthcare by 2028 will be doctor-directed, patient-owned and powered by visual technologies

Evan Nisselson Contributor Evan Nisselson is a partner at LDV Capital. More posts by this contributor Deep learning with synthetic data will democratize the tech industry The war over artificial intelligence will be won with visual data Visual assessment is critical to healthcare – whether that is a doctor peering down your throat as you say “ahhh” or an MRI of your brain. Since the X-ray was invented in 1895, medical imaging h...
Tags: Travel, Health, TC, Column, Technology, Medicine, Boston, Cancer, Syria, Artificial Intelligence, Stroke, Telecommunications, Healthcare, Disease, Genomics, Dementia


This toilet seat checks your heart health

Smart toilets that analyze urine and poop in the bowl have been demonstrated for years, but now Rochester Institute of Technology engineers have integrated multiple kinds of biosensors into the toilet's seat. The WiFi-enable systems tracks EEG, blood oxygen levels, and the heart's pumping force. From IEEE Spectrum: If the monitoring system works as expected, the device could help catch early signs of heart decline and decrease the number of hospitalizations for heart patients. To test thei...
Tags: Post, Science, News, Medicine, Medical, Toilets, Bathrooms, Conn, Rochester Institute of Technology


Link About It: This Week’s Picks

Farewell to Florence Knoll Bassett, Sweden's affinity for erotica, how germs communicate and more Pioneer of Office Design, Florence Knoll Bassett Dies at 101 Anyone familiar with open floor plans, straight lines and simplicity within their office knows the work of Florence Knoll Bassett. The acclaimed architect and designer reimagined corporate workspaces through her system of “total design,” which removed heavier drapes and desks and …
Tags: Google Chrome, Books, Space, Science, Design, Technology, Sweden, Medicine, Nasa, Artists, Linkaboutit, Link About It, Audio Books, Human body, Florence Knoll Bassett, Germ Communities


Germ Communities in Our Gut Talk to Our Brain

There are trillions of microbes inside the human body, and University College Cork professor Dr John Cryan’s studies indicate that these germ communities appear to influence both the brain and its behaviors. Since that groundbreaking and contested 2014 announcement, much more research has continued to support the idea that the human microbiome impacts depression, dementia, autism, schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s and even Parkinson’s disease. All of this …
Tags: Health, Science, Design, Medicine, Neuroscience, Tech, Microbiology, Brains, Germs, Linkaboutit, John Cryan, University College Cork


Design Heals at Parsley Health’s Reimagined Medical Office

From design to doctors, a new and impressive approach to wellness Wellness is a journey, not a destination. For some, it’s about living their best life with a chronic illness; for others, it’s simply about optimizing from a place of strength. These two types of people loosely summarize the member base at Parsley Health, a practice applying more holistic points of view to traditional healthcare. Everything …
Tags: Health, Wellness, Design, Medicine, Interviews, NYC, Healthcare, Doctors, Interior Design, Office Design, Parsley Health, Biophilia, Parsley Health 's Reimagined Medical Office


Will Elderberry Syrup Help Your Cold?

When you’re laid up with sniffles and a sore throat, few things offer real relief. (Rest, fluids, and behind-the-counter Sudafed are most of those things.) But there are plenty of “natural” items on drugstore shelves that claim to help. Today we’re looking at one with a teensy bit of scientific evidence behind it:…Read more...
Tags: Health, Medicine, Supplements, Colds, Flu, Lifehacks, Homeopathy, Elderberry


New therapy turns cancer cells into fat to stop it from spreading

In 2018, an estimated 627,000 women died from breast cancer worldwide. Researchers recently discovered a drug combination that turned cancer cells into fat cells, preventing its proliferation. The drug therapy could be used to halt metastasis, the leading cause of death from cancer.It may be a family member, a friend, a coworker, or even yourself, but chances are breast cancer will invade your life at some point. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 242,476 new cases of fe...
Tags: Health, Medicine, Cancer, Genetics, Medical Research, Innovation, Switzerland, Disease, Fda, Illness, University of Basel, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Molecular Biology, Human body, Gerhard Christofori


What doctors can learn from patients who draw their illnesses

One important, but often neglected, factor in the transition from sickness to health is in how patients perceive and understand their illness.It's challenging for physicians to gain insight into the mental and physical state of their patients.A new review of 101 articles has found that asking patients to draw their illnesses can help predict health outcomes and provide doctors insight into their patients' experiences. None One of the challenges to making sick people healthy is to make sure they ...
Tags: Psychology, Health, Medicine, Innovation, Disease, Illness, Broadbent, Healthy Psychology Review, Elizabeth Broadbent


Complete Axolotl Genome Could Pave the Way Toward Human Tissue Regeneration

The adorable and enigmatic axolotl is capable of regenerating many different body parts, including limbs, organs, and even portions of its brain. Scientists hope that a deeper understanding of these extraordinary abilities could help make this kind of tissue regeneration possible for humans. With news today of the…Read more...
Tags: Science, Medicine, Animals, Salamanders, Tissue Regeneration, Whole Genome Sequencing, Axolotls


Shapeshifting microrobots to travel through your bloodstream

Continuing the quest to design robots that could travel through our bodies to deliver drugs and cure disease, researchers at EPFL and ETH Zurich demonstrated tiny shape-shifting microrobots that swim through blood vessels. Made from hydrogel nanocomposites, the microbots can fold into various shapes for easy travel through tight spaces and flowing with dense, viscous, or fast-moving liquids. The microbots are peppered with magnetic nanoparticles so that they can be "steered" with an external ma...
Tags: Video, News, Medicine, Robots, Robotics, Eth Zurich, EPFL, Microrobots, Selman Sakar


The surgeon who removed his own appendix

On April 29, 1961, Dr. Leonid Rogozov was in Antarctica in a blizzard when his stomach began to hurt. Badly. The only physician on the Soviet Antarctic Expedition, Rogozov realized his appendix needed to come out before it burst and killed him. Rogozov's only choice was to take the matter into his hands. He roped in a meteorologist and a driver to assist. From MDLinx: Dr. Rogozov assumed a semi-reclined position designed to allow him to perform the operation with minimal use of a mirror... “...
Tags: Post, News, Diy, Medicine, Surgery, Antarctica, Physician, Leonid Rogozov, Antarctic Expedition Rogozov, Rogozov


Link About It: This Week’s Picks

Eavesdropping flowers, enormous digital photography, AI for medicine and more AI Diagnoses Genetic Disorders Using Facial Photos While doctors can identify genetic disorders with an accuracy between 70% and 75%, DeepGestalt—an AI project by FDNA—can do so with accuracy of 90% and over. By analyzing the face piece-by-piece, the system finds a corresponding disorder for that crop, moves on to the next and then pools the …
Tags: Science, Design, Podcasts, Medicine, China, Nature, Shanghai, Plants, Ai, Linkaboutit, Link About It, Megapixels, Genetic Disorders, Bigpixel


Turns out that injecting semen into your arm doesn't cure back pain after all

A man in Ireland repeatedly injected semen into his arm in the hopes that it would cure his back pain. He instead got a subcutaneous abcess and had to get professional help. [via Gizmodo] Drs. Dunne, Murphy and Rutledge report: A 33 year old male was seen complaining of severe, sudden onset lower back pain. He reported lifting a heavy steel object 3 days prior and his symptoms had progressed ever since. This gentleman had a history of chronic low back pain without neurology. Thorough physical ex...
Tags: Health, Post, News, Medicine, Ireland, Mistakes, Gizmodo, Rutledge, Body Horror, Jizz Abcess, Dunne Murphy


Experimental Treatment Helps Maryland Woman Beat Lymphoma

Our dear friend Dr. Pashna Munshi is part of the team that is working on this experimental treatment for Lymphoman. A Maryland woman who suffered a lengthy battle with stage-three non-Hodgkin lymphoma is now in complete remission after receiving a promising new treatment that uses a patient’s own cells to fight cancer. Daisy Diggs, 67, is the first patient to do the CAR-T cell procedure at MedStar Georgetown University Hospital as part of a clinical trial. Article By Aimee Cho, www.nbcwashingt...
Tags: Maryland, Medicine, Life, Fda, Hodgkin, Diggs, MedStar Georgetown University Hospital, MedStar Georgetown, Munshi, Maryland Woman Beat Lymphoma, Pashna Munshi, Daisy Diggs, Aimee Cho, Diggs Munshi


Man Injects 18 'Doses' of Semen Into Arm to Cure Back Pain, Ends Up in Hospital

In a new case study, Irish doctors report the baffling case of a 33-year-old man who injected his own semen intravenously for a year and a half, a self-developed “cure” intended to treat his chronic back pain. It does not appear to have worked.Read more...
Tags: Health, Science, Diy, Medicine, Gross, Case studies, Biohacking, Semen