Posts filtered by tags: Medicine[x]


 

California Launches Website to Help Residents Get Digital Vaccine Record, Insists It’s Not a Passport

A new website in California will give the public a way to access their digital covid-19 vaccine record and share their proof of vaccination. While that may sound awfully close to a vaccine passport, which is a contentious topic in some states, California insists that it’s not.Read more...
Tags: Health, Science, Medicine, California, Vaccination, Vaccine, Immunology, Passports, Erica Pan, Medical Specialties, Covid 19 Vaccine, Technology Internet, Health Medical Pharma, Immunity Passport, Vaccination Requirements For International Travel


Don't be rude to your doctor. It might kill you.

Anchoring is a common bias that makes people fixate on one piece of data. A study showed that those who experienced rudeness were more likely to anchor themselves to bad data.In some simulations with medical students, this effect led to higher mortality rates.Cognitive biases are funny little things. Everyone has them, nobody likes to admit it, and they can range from minor to severe depending on the situation. Biases can be influenced by factors as subtle as our mood or various personality ...
Tags: Medicine, Communication, Innovation, Emotions, Don, Journal of Applied Psychology, Trevor Foulk, Foulk


Mobile dialysis startup eyes human trials in 2022 following encouraging animal study

This past year, three sheep in Canada have been wearing their kidneys on their sleeves. Or more aptly, in jackets on their fluffy backs.  These three sheep are part of an ongoing animal study run by the Buffalo, New York-based startup Qidni Labs, a company pursuing waterless and mobile blood purification systems. Qidni Labs was founded in 2014, has raised $1.5 million and is currently in the due diligence process leading up to another round of funding. Qidni Labs was also an award winner ...
Tags: Health, TC, Medicine, Cdc, US, Tech, Canada, Medicare, Fda, Buffalo, Biotech, Infection, Davita, Dialysis, Morteza, Fresenius


CDC to Ban Dogs From 113 Countries for a Year Over Rabies Fears

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is enacting a temporary ban on imported dogs coming to the U.S. from over 100 countries, due to a heightened risk of rabies.Read more...
Tags: Science, Medicine, Cdc, Vaccination, Vaccine, Centers For Disease Control And Prevention, Rabies, Global Alliance for Rabies Control, Clinical Medicine, Medical Specialties, Rabies In Animals, Emily Pieracci


We're winning the war on cancer

A new study projects that cancer deaths will decrease in relative and absolute terms by 2040.The biggest decrease will be among lung cancer deaths, which are predicted to fall by 50 percent.Cancer is like terrorism: we cannot eliminate it entirely, but we can minimize its influence. As the #2 leading cause of death, cancer takes the lives of about 600,000 Americans each year. In comparison, heart disease (#1) claims more than 650,000 lives, while accidents (#3) take about 175,000 lives. (In 20...
Tags: Facebook, Medicine, Cancer, Innovation, NHL, Hodgkin, JAMA Network Open, Lola Rahib


Could flickering lights fight Alzheimer's? Early research looks promising

For the past few years, Annabelle Singer and her collaborators have been using flickering lights and sound to treat mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, and they've seen some dramatic results.Now they have results from the first human feasibility study of the flicker treatment, and they're promising."We looked at safety, tolerance, and adherence, and several different biological outcomes, and the results were excellent—better than we expected," says Singer, assistant professor in the biomedical ...
Tags: Health, Medicine, Georgia, Brain, Medical Research, Innovation, Emory, Wright, Georgia Institute of Technology, Alzheimer, Lah, Human body, Annabelle Singer, Emory University Singer, American Neurological Association, James Lah


Name in the news: Phexxi

A new birth-control product, Phexxi, was the subject of a long story in the New York Times Styles section on June 10. “The pill helped start the sexual revolution,” reads the headline. “What will Phexxi do?” What is Phexxi? According to the product website, Phexxi is a nonhormonal vaginal gel that “works to pr event pregnancy by altering the pH of your vagina, which is different from hormonal birth control.” Its primary ingredients are lactic acid, citric acid, and potassium bitartrate (the ...
Tags: Medicine, Women, US, X, Linguistics, Fda, Times, Nancy, Exxon, Lexi, Naming, Nancy Friedman, Names in the News, Evofem Biosciences, Saundra Pelletier, New York Times Styles


Biden Will Reportedly Buy 500 Million Pfizer Vaccine Doses to Donate Globally

The Biden administration just struck a deal with Pfizer to buy 500 million doses of the covid-19 vaccine from the pharma giant, with plans to donate the doses to countries that need them, sources familiar with the pact told the Washington Post on Wednesday.Read more...
Tags: Politics, Science, Medicine, Washington Post, Medical Research, World Health Organization, Pfizer, Vaccines, Biden, Clinical Trials, Covid 19, Covax, Covid 19 Vaccine, Deployment Of Covid 19 Vaccines, Health Medical Pharma, Rna Vaccines


Wisconsin Pharmacist Who Destroyed Hundreds of Covid-19 Vaccine Doses Sentenced to 3 Years Prison

On Tuesday, a federal judge sentenced Steven Brandenburg, the Wisconsin pharmacist whom police say deliberately sabotaged hundreds of covid-19 vaccine doses last December, to three years in federal prison, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports. Brandenburg had earlier admitted to tampering with the vaccines over…Read more...
Tags: Science, Medicine, Articles, Medical Research, Wisconsin, Pfizer, Clinical Trials, Brandenburg, Milwaukee Journal Sentinel, Moderna, Health Sciences, Steven Brandenburg, Covid 19 Vaccine, Law Crime, Covid 19 Vaccines, Pfizerbiontech Covid 19 Vaccine


‘It’s infuriating and shocking’: how medicine has failed women over time

In the eye-opening new book Unwell Women, Elinor Cleghorn uses her own misdiagnosis at the hands of male doctors as a jumping point for an alarming history lessonHippocrates, the founder of modern medicine, believed that women were controlled by their uteruses. The father of modern gynecology, James Marion Sims, in the mid 1800s experimented on enslaved black women without anesthesia, convinced that they felt less pain than white women. (Until its removal in 2018, his statue stood in New York Ci...
Tags: Health, Books, Gender, Medicine, Women, Culture, Healthcare Industry, James Marion Sims, New York City 's Central Park, Elinor Cleghorn


A cancer immunotherapy technique may prevent diabetes

This article was originally published on our sister site, Freethink.Nearly 2 million Americans suffer from type 1 diabetes — a condition that causes drastic spikes or drops in sugar levels and, in turn, dizziness, nausea, and fatigue. It's a condition that must constantly be monitored, something that a lot of diabetics find mentally exhausting. One diabetic, Naomi, told the BBC that she couldn't handle "the physical or mental challenges of diabetes anymore," and struggled to monitor her blood su...
Tags: Medicine, Cancer, Bbc, Innovation, Fda, University Of Arizona, National Academy of Sciences, Harvard Medical School, Naomi, Kuhns, Michael Kuhns, Thomas Serwold


Scientists can induce out-of-body experiences without drugs

This article was originally published on our sister site, Freethink.Feeling centered and in control of your body is a part of being human that we take for granted in our daily lives. But for millions of people suffering from post-traumatic stress, epilepsy, or another neuropsychiatric condition, this sense of self can slip out their hands in moments of "dissociation."These dissociated states, which are often described as out-of-body experiences, are not inherently harmful in themselves, but they...
Tags: Psychology, Medicine, Mental Health, Innovation, Stanford University, Karl Deisseroth, Deisseroth


FDA Approves 'Game Changer' Weight Loss Drug, Likely First in a New Era of Obesity Treatment

On Friday, the Food and Drug Administration approved a new injectable medication for treating obesity—one shown to help people lose a significant amount of weight in clinical trials when taken regularly. The drug, called Wegovy, may just signal a new era in obesity treatment.Read more...
Tags: Science, Medicine, Obesity, Diabetes, Food And Drug Administration, Fda, Novo Nordisk, Bariatric Surgery, Donna Ryan, Semaglutide, Clinical Medicine, Medical Specialties, Hospitality Recreation, Health Medical Pharma, Glucagon Like Peptide 1, Anti Diabetic Drugs


Electric eels and gladiator blood: the curious beginnings of modern medicine

Ancient "medicine" once consisted of sacrificial offerings and divine petition. Disease was a supernatural infliction; health was a gift.Hippocrates invented medical science, and his theory of the humors and holistic health dominated Western medical thought for more than two thousand years.Today, medicine is much more disease centred, and perhaps something has been lost from the Hippocratic doctor-patient relationship. You're feeling sick — so sick you can barely walk — and so you visit a prof...
Tags: Greece, Medicine, Innovation, Oxford, Philosophy, History of science, Hermès, Alexandria, Tallinn Estonia, Voltaire, Ancient Greece, Hippocrates, Philosophy Of Science, Jonny Thomson, Wikipedia Public, Raeapteek


Which Countries Will Receive America's Donated Covid-19 Vaccine Doses?

The White House announced on Thursday that the U.S. will donate at least 80 million covid-19 doses to countries around the world by the end of June, with the first 25 million doses going out to nations in the very near future. But where exactly are the doses heading?Read more...
Tags: Politics, Science, Medicine, White House, America, Medical Research, World Health Organization, Vaccines, Clinical Trials, Covid 19, Covax, Covid 19 Vaccine, Covid 19 Vaccines, Pfizerbiontech Covid 19 Vaccine, Covid 19 Vaccination In Africa, Covid 19 Vaccination In Indonesia


Ketamine infusion: The new therapy for depression, explained

Ketamine is the first hallucinogen approved for therapeutic use in the U.S. Research has shown ketamine is effective at treating depression. Though ketamine infusion therapy is now being offered at hundreds of North American clinics, there are unaddressed dangers in the current ketamine gold rush. In March 2019, the FDA approved ketamine, under the trade name Spravato (esketamine), for clinical use in treatment-resistant depression therapy. Alongside racemic ketamine, which is commonly ...
Tags: Facebook, Medicine, Time, Depression, Anxiety, Medical Research, United States, Innovation, Fda, North America, Physiology, Derek, Toronto Ontario Canada, Janssen, British Journal of Psychiatry, Human body


Why Is Everyone Suddenly Talking About COVID-19 Escaping From a Lab?

There’s been a pretty broad consensus among scientists who study viruses that the one that causes COVID-19 arose naturally and passed from animals to humans sometime in late 2019, in or near Wuhan, China. But an alternate hypothesis—that it escaped from a lab in that city—has been tossed around like a political…Read more...
Tags: Health, Medicine, Environment, Virus, Lifehacks, Biden, Wall Street Journal, Wuhan China, Coronavirus, Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome, Covid 19, Coronaviridae, Zoonoses, Sarbecovirus, Investigations Into The Origin Of Covid 19, Draftemergence Of Covid 19 Outbreak


Brain study strengthens link between lithium and suicide

Lithium appears essential to brain activity, but how it works remains a mystery. A team of researchers analyzed where in the brain lithium tends to accumulate in two healthy controls and one suicide victim.The healthy controls had more lithium in their white matter than gray matter.Lithium is known to students of chemistry as the lightest solid element, to electronics enthusiasts as a fine material to make a battery out of, and to millions of others as an effective medication. It was initially ...
Tags: Medicine, Mental Health, Brain, Depression, Innovation, Coca Cola, Jutta Schöpfer


Nurse blamed for death of Redondo Beach man faces possible loss of license

A registered nurse found liable last year for botching a procedure that caused the death of a 73-year-old patient at Providence Little Company of Mary Medical Center in Torrance now faces allegations that could result in revocation of his work license. John Vincent Flynn, listed on El Camino College’s Spring and Fall 2021 class schedules as a faculty member who teaches nursing skills courses, was accused May 11 by California Attorney General Rob Bonta and the state Board of Registered Nursing of...
Tags: New York, News, Medicine, California, Los Angeles, Sport, Hospital, Hospitals, Public Health, Soccer, Beverly Hills, Coroner, Local News, Department Of Consumer Affairs, Inglewood, Flynn


People with COVID have a subtle scent that dogs can detect in under a second

People who are infected with COVID-19 give off a subtle but distinct odor that dogs can recognize in less than a second, according to new scientific research. Physician Claire Guest and colleagues built on a prior study showing that dogs could be trained detect human bladder cancer by smelling a patient's urine. — Read the rest
Tags: Post, News, Medicine, Dogs, Medical, Claire Guest, COVID-19


Body augmentation: People adjust quickly to robotic third thumb

Researchers trained people to use a robotic extra thumb in daily situations. Brain scan data suggest the brain's quick adaptability to new limbs.The scientists think body augmentation could transform human abilities.Would you be willing to attach artificial limbs to enhance your body? A research team that asked people to use robotic extra thumbs found that their brains quickly adapted to body augmentation. Humans of the future are likely to utilize body parts with improvements, the scientists p...
Tags: Biology, Medicine, Computers, Brain, Innovation, Mind, Robotics, University College London, University College, Dani, Makin, Science Robotics, Dani Clode, Tamar Makin, Paulina Kieliba


Body augmentation: Your brain can quickly learn to use extra limbs

Researchers trained people to use a robotic extra thumb in daily situations.Brain scan data suggest the brain's quick adaptability to new limbs. The scientists think body augmentation could transform human abilities.Would you be willing to attach artificial limbs to enhance your body? A research team that asked people to use robotic extra thumbs found that their brains quickly adapted to body augmentation. Humans of the future are likely to utilize body parts with improvements, the scientists pr...
Tags: Biology, Medicine, Computers, Brain, Innovation, Mind, Robotics, University College London, Dani, Makin, Science Robotics, Dani Clode, Tamar Makin, Paulina Kieliba, University College London How


"When you ask, 'Is this ethically bad?' Well, you also have to put the opposite: Are there ethical issues for not doing research in that period?"

"In many ways, you could argue it would be unethical not to do it.... There's very good reasons for doing this research. And people shouldn't be scared about it if there are robust mechanisms of review and oversight... Is viability even an endpoint?... I felt that it would be both difficult and a little pointless to propose any new limit, which would be arbitrary, much like 14 days." Said Robin Lovell-Badge of the Crick Institute, quoted in "Controversial New Guidelines Would Allow Experiments O...
Tags: Medicine, Law, Ethics, Ann Althouse, Crick Institute, Robin Lovell Badge


Sea cucumber crime is a thing, and this is where it’s happening

Long a delicacy in China and East Asia, sea cucumbers are now also becoming a rarity worldwide.India has outlawed the trade, inaugurated a marine reserve, and put together a law enforcement task force.But the trade remains legal in Sri Lanka, which has become the hub for widespread "seafood laundering." Adam's (or Rama's) Bridge between India (left) and Sri Lanka, as captured from the Space Shuttle Endeavour in 1994.Credit: NASA, public domain.The string of li...
Tags: Maps, Medicine, China, India, Nasa, Conservation, Innovation, Sri Lanka, East Asia, Yucatan, Red Sea, Rama, Adam, Bay of Bengal, Lakshadweep, Eiffel Towers


When It's Okay To Ask Someone If They're Vaccinated (and How to Do It)

Even though COVID-19 infection rates and hospitalizations are declining across the country, some gray area and potential danger remains: Fifty percent of U.S. adults have been fully vaccinated, which is a remarkable achievement and a sign of impending normality, but a high share of adults remain hesitant or outright…Read more...
Tags: Medicine, Vaccination, Vaccine, Lifehacks, Immunology, Passports, Medical Specialties, Health Medical Pharma, Immunity Passport


50% of U.S. Adults Will Be Fully Vaccinated by End of Today

The United States is at a pivotal point in its efforts to combat the covid-19 pandemic. By the end of Tuesday, it’s expected that a majority of American adults will be fully vaccinated, and within days, a majority of all Americans will have gotten at least one dose of a covid-19 vaccine. The accomplishment comes in…Read more...
Tags: Health, Science, Medicine, Medical Research, United States, Pfizer, Vaccine, Johnson Johnson, Moderna, BioNtech, Medical Specialties, Covid 19 Vaccine, Health Medical Pharma, Covid 19 Vaccination In The United States, Covid 19 Vaccination In Norway


What is the objection to a law against something that we're told no one is doing anyway?

I'm reading (NYT). If medical practice already draws the line in the same place — no hormone treatment before puberty — then why object to the law? Or you can put the question the other way: Why pass the law?1. There is symbolism — messaging — in passing the law and in refraining from passing the law. Politicians might want to express opposition to/support for transgender people.2. There is trust/mistrust in the medical profession. Do you believe they'll determine the best treatments and restr...
Tags: Medicine, Law, Transgender, Tennessee, Ama, Ann Althouse


If You Have Allergies, Don't Ditch Your Mask Yet

If you’re fully vaccinated, you may be looking forward to using your masks less and less often, now that the CDC has said fully vaccinated Americans can go without masks in many situations. But if you have allergies to dust or pollen, it might be worth keeping them around. Read more...
Tags: Medicine, Cdc, Immune System, Lifehacks, Immunology, Allergy, Respirators, Allergen, Cloth Face Mask, N95 Respirator, Nokia N95 Smartphone, Medical Specialties, Surgical Mask, Health Medical Pharma, Allergology, Aeroallergen


Single dose of psilocybin may treat migraines

Migraines afflict more than ten percent of the U.S. population, yet treatments are often unreliable and there is no cure. The new study involves giving migraine sufferers a placebo and, two weeks later, a single dose of pure synthetic psilocybin.The results showed that participants reported significantly fewer migraines in the two weeks after the study.Psychedelics research is enjoying a renaissance. In recent years, studies have shown that hallucinogenic drugs like LSD, psilocybin, and MDMA see...
Tags: Health, Medicine, Drugs, Brain, Medical Research, Innovation, Heather, Neurotherapeutics


8 COVID Vaccine Myths and How to Debunk Them

It’s been interesting to watch COVID vaccine rumors evolve (mutate?) in the months since the vaccines were first introduced. At first, many of the myths were based on the fact that there was a lot we didn’t know about the vaccines. But there’s a lot less room for legitimate-sounding fear-mongering now that we have…Read more...
Tags: Medicine, Medical Research, Vaccination, Pfizer, Vaccine, Lifehacks, Clinical Trials, Johnson Johnson, Pence, Moderna, Health Sciences, Covid 19, Johnson Vaccine, Covid 19 Vaccine, Rna Vaccine, Health Medical Pharma