Posts filtered by tags: Medicine[x]


 

Man dies from overdose of black licorice

A 54-year-old man in Massachusetts died from eating too much black licorice, reports a cardiologist in the New England Journal of Medicine. Apparently the deceased at a bag and a half every few weeks. "Even a small amount of licorice you eat can increase your blood pressure a little bit," said Massachusetts General Hospital cardiologist Dr.… Read the rest
Tags: Health, Post, News, Medicine, B-side, Bside, Massachusetts, Medical, Candy, Massachusetts General Hospital, Licorice


United Airlines is making COVID-19 tests available to passengers, powered in part by Color

There’s still no clear path back to any sense of ‘business-as-usual’ as the COVID-19 pandemic continues, but United Airlines is embarking on a new pilot project to see if easy access to COVID-19 testing immediately prior to a flight can help ease freedom of mobility. The airline will offer COVID-19 tests (either rapid tests at the airport, or mail-in at home tests prior to travel) to passengers flying from SFO in San Francisco to Hawaiian airpots, beginning on October 15. United worked direct...
Tags: Health, TC, Medicine, San Francisco, Tech, United States, Hawaii, Prevention, Sfo, Aerospace, United, Airline, United Airlines, Physician, Quarantine, GoHealth


Dr. Hoshedar P. Tamboli Voted Top Cardiologist 2020 by Florida Magazine

Heart Vascular and Vein of Tampa Bay proudly announces that Dr. Hoshedar Tamboli will be joining the practice, starting Aug. 31, 2020. Dr. Tamboli has been in the practice of interventional and consultative cardiology in Tampa for 28 years. Recently, he was awarded “Top Cardiologist 2020” in the area by Florida Magazine on the recommendation of patients and his peers. He was involved with the very first coronary stent placed in Tampa (1993) and was a national proctor teaching other cardiologist...
Tags: Medicine, Life, West Virginia, Tampa, Marshall University, Tampa Bay, University of South Florida, Tampa Bay Area, Florida Magazine, Tamboli, Hoshedar P Tamboli, Hoshedar Tamboli, Fox Hollow, Cardiology Departments of Advent Hospital, Brandon Regional Hospital, Interventional Cardiology


Daphne Koller: ‘Digital biology is an incredible place to be right now’

Working at the intersection of biology and computing may be the most exciting new spot for technologists at the moment. That’s the word from Daphne Koller, the founder and chief executive officer of Insitro — the biotech company that’s raised over $243 million in the two short years since it launched. Speaking at our virtual TechCrunch Disrupt conference, Koller, a serial entrepreneur who previously co-founded Coursera and briefly served as the chief computing officer for the Alphabet subs...
Tags: Health, TC, Medicine, Digital, Chief executive officer, Tech, Computing, Disease, Machine Learning, Illness, Coursera, Gilead, Clayton Christensen, Koller, Daphne Koller, Drug Discovery


"Every treatment so far shown to help coronavirus patients... is intended only for seriously ill hospitalized patients. Those with mild to moderate disease have had to wait and hope for the best."

But now: "A single infusion of an experimental drug has markedly reduced blood levels of the coronavirus in newly infected patients and lowered the chances that they would need hospitalization, the drug’s maker announced on Wednesday."Writes Gina Kolata in "An Experimental Drug Protects Covid-19 Patients, Eli Lilly Claims/A so-called monoclonal antibody lowered blood levels of the coronavirus and prevented hospitalizations. The research has not yet been vetted by independent experts" (NYT).I was...
Tags: Medicine, Law, Fat, Grammar, New York Times, Chapel Hill, University Of North Carolina, Don, Cohen, Eli Lilly, Myron Cohen, Gina Kolata, Ann Althouse, Daniel Skovronsky, Coronavirus, Institute for Global Health


White House Says It Won't Help Global Vaccine Effort to Spite China, World Health Organization

The U.S. won’t contribute to an international effort to develop a vaccine for SARS-CoV-2, the novel coronavirus that causes covid-19, the White House said on Tuesday, because it involves the “corrupt World Health Organization” and China.Read more...
Tags: Health, Science, Medicine, White House, China, World Health Organization, Vaccines, Donald Trump, Coronavirus, Covid 19, Sars Cov 2, Spite China World Health Organization


California legislation: State could be first to develop its own generic drugs

By Angela Hart and Samantha Young | Kaiser Health News California is poised to become the first state to develop its own line of generic drugs, targeting soaring drug prices and stepping into a fiercely competitive drug market dominated by deep-pocketed pharmaceutical companies. The Democratic-controlled legislature overwhelmingly approved a measure Monday that would direct the state’s top health agency to partner with one or more drug companies by January to make or distribute a broad range of ...
Tags: Utah, Business, New York, Medicine, Congress, Colorado, California, Washington, Senate, Sacramento, Sport, Soccer, Michelin, New Mexico, Bill, Novo Nordisk


The Medical Screenings All Men Need, and When

No matter how fast science develops new treatments, preventive medicine will always be the most effective and cheapest way to stay healthy. In a separate post, we shared the most common health screenings for women; today we’ll look at men’s health screenings: when you should get them, and what to expect when you doRead more...
Tags: Medicine, Cancer, Health Care, Lifehacks, Mens Health, Screenings, Preventative Medicine


What Will Post-Coronavirus Social Life Really Be Like?

How many sentences, since March, have started with the words “when all this is over”? Billions, probably, but fewer of late, as each of us reckons with the fact that this will never be over, not really. Psychologically, economically—we’re wrecked. A vaccine will certainly help, but it can only fix so much. Already I…Read more...
Tags: Health, Science, Medicine, Safety, Masks, Social Life, Sociology, Coronavirus, Covid 19, Social Distancing


"When police arrested the middle-aged Uighur woman at the height of China’s coronavirus outbreak... she was forced to drink a medicine that made her feel weak and nauseous..."

"... guards watching as she gulped. She and the others also had to strip naked once a week and cover their faces as guards hosed them and their cells down with disinfectant 'like firemen,' she said. 'It was scalding,' recounted the woman by phone from Xinjiang, declining to be named out of fear of retribution. '“My hands were ruined, my skin was peeling.'... [I]n what experts call a breach of medical ethics, some residents [of the Xinjiang region] are being coerced into swallowing traditional Ch...
Tags: Medicine, Law, China, Ethics, World Health Organization, Xinjiang, Wuhan, Germany Switzerland, Darren Byler, Ann Althouse, Coronavirus, Xinjiang Qingfei Paidu, University of Colorado They


Fauci: I Was Having Surgery When Task Force Discussed Watering Down CDC Testing Guidelines

Dr. Anthony Fauci said on Wednesday that he wasn’t present in the room when other members of the White House Coronavirus Task Force decided to change its covid-19 testing guidelines. In fact, he was zonked out to high heaven on general anesthesia in an operating room.Read more...
Tags: Health, Science, Medicine, Cdc, Anthony Fauci, Centers For Disease Control And Prevention, Fauci, Coronavirus, Covid 19, Sars Cov 2, White House Coronavirus Task Force, Dr Fauci


Meet antivitamins. They may replace your antibiotics one day

As pathogens' resistance grows, scientists are searching for a class of drugs that could replace antibiotics.Antivitamins that switch off vitamins in bacteria are being investigated.Scientists have been struggling to understand how naturally occurring antivitamins do what they do. Though many of us have never heard of antivitamins, scientists have known about them since Sir Edward Mellanby identified the first one — though he called it a "toxamin" — in the late 1930s. These substances do what...
Tags: Health, Medicine, Germany, Discovery, Bacteria, Medical Research, Microbiology, Innovation, University of Göttingen, Antibiotic, Texas A M University in College Station Texas, Tittmann, Antivitamin, Antivitamins, Edward Mellanby, Kai Tittmann


COVID-19 symptoms appear in a specific order, study finds

USC researchers identify a distinct order in which COVID-19 symptoms present themselves.SARS-CoV-2 affects the digestive tract in a way that distinguishes it from other similar infections.If you experience these symptoms in this order, call your doctor. One of the scary things about COVID-19 is that the early symptoms it presents are also common indicators of a flu or infection: fever, cough, and so on. When a person experiences any of these symptoms these days, it's reasonable to wonder if the...
Tags: Health, Medicine, China, Medical Research, Middle East, Innovation, Disease, World Health Organization, Illness, Usc, Southern Hemisphere, Larsen, Peter Kuhn, Pandemic, Coronavirus, COVID


Women experience adverse drug reactions nearly twice as frequently as men. Here's why.

A new study investigates adverse drug reactions in women and men.Women are on average lighter in weight and have smaller organs and more body fat, which affects the absorption and distribution of drugs. The authors suggest more individualized dosage recommendations moving forward. The double-blind study has been under fire for years due to the replication crisis: numerous clinical studies cannot be repeated by other researchers. While still considered the gold standard in science—a control is...
Tags: Biology, Medicine, Women, America, Medical Research, Innovation, Men, University Of Chicago, University Of California Berkeley, Nih, Derek, Twitter Facebook, PKs, Human body, Brian Prendergast, Irving Zucker


Scientists solve Leonardo da Vinci’s 500-year-old human heart mystery

Scientists discover the function of the trabeculae, muscle fibers lining human hearts. The structures were first described by Leonard da Vinci over 500 years ago.The trabeculae have an effect on the heart's performance and failure. Scientists found out the purpose of mysterious structures in the human heart, first described by Leonardo da Vinci 500 years ago. The mesh of muscle fibers called trabeculae lines the inner surface of the heart and was shown to affect how well the heart functions...
Tags: UK, Biology, Medicine, History, Medical Research, Innovation, Da Vinci, Ewan Birney, Leonardo da Vinci, European Molecular Biology Laboratory, Leonardo Davinci, Human body, Leonard da Vinci, Birney, MRC London Institute of Medical Sciences, Bioinformatic Institute


Man whose stomach brewed beer is cured—by a poop transplant​

Last year, it was reported that a Belgian man arrested for drunk driving brewed the alcohol in his own gut. The disorder, auto-brewery syndrome, occurred after he took a round of antibiotics.He was cured after a fecal donation from his daughter. Nearly a year ago, headlines across the web were dominated by a 46-year-old man that brewed his own beer. His artisanal approach was quite unique: his stomach fermented its own contents thanks to a rare disorder known as auto-brewery syndrome (ABS).You...
Tags: Health, Medicine, Obesity, Beer, Microbiology, Innovation, Belgium, Illness, Derek, Twitter Facebook, Human body, University Hospital Ghent


Please Keep Mark Zuckerberg Away From My Bones

Most of us might think of Facebook as the social network of choice for suburban moms and conspiracy theorists, but the company hasn’t been shy about branching out to become much more than an app on our phones, even if that’s the last thing we want. Here’s an example: earlier today, Facebook put out a company blog post…Read more...
Tags: Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg, Science, Medicine, Medical Marvels


Public health leaders in California, nationwide leaving jobs amid pandemic pressures

Nearly a dozen state and local health leaders, including a pair in Orange and San Bernardino counties, have retired or resigned since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic under the crushing responsibility of serving as the often vilified public face in the fight against the virus. The departures in California mirror a nationwide trend in which dozens of top health officers have left formerly low-key positions after they were thrust into the white-hot, polarizing spotlight of the coronavirus pandem...
Tags: Health, News, Medicine, Colorado, California, Cdc, US, Sport, Ap, Public Health, Soccer, Ohio, Associated Press, Oklahoma, Disneyland, Local News


The World’s Best Hope for Enough Covid-19 Vaccine Comes from India

▲ Adar Poonawalla, CEO of the Serum Institute, and his wife, Natasha, at their ranch in Pune, India. Photographer: Subhash Sharma for Bloomberg Businessweek The Serum Institute of India is preparing to crank out a billion doses. And that’s just the beginning. By Ari Altstedter | Bloomberg As chief executive officer of the Serum Institute of India, the largest manufacturer of vaccines in the world, Adar Poonawalla can produce about 1.5 billion doses a year of almost any inoculation. He has ma...
Tags: Europe, Medicine, France, Life, India, Narendra Modi, Bloomberg, Paris, Oxford, West Africa, World Health Organization, Astrazeneca, Airbus, Bloomberg Businessweek, Michelin, University of Oxford


Russia claims world's first COVID-19 vaccine but skepticism abounds

Vladimir Putin announced on Tuesday that a COVID-19 vaccine has been approved in Russia.Scientists around the world are worried that the vaccine is unsafe and that Russia fast-tracked the vaccine without performing the necessary phase 3 trials.To date, Russia has had nearly 900,000 registered cases of coronavirus. Russia's President Vladimir Putin announced on Tuesday, August 11th that his country was the first to approve a coronavirus vaccine, provoking skepticism from Russian and internationa...
Tags: Biology, Medicine, Putin, Vladimir Putin, China, Russia, Public Health, Innovation, Moscow, Imperial College London, Epidemiology, Defense Ministry, Putin Russia, Philippines Brazil, United Arab Emirates Saudi Arabia, Coronavirus


VenoStent has a new technology to improve outcomes for dialysis patients

Timothy Bouré and his co-founder Geoffrey Lucks were both near broke when they moved to Dallas to join the first accelerator they entered after forming VenoStent, a company that aims to improve outcomes for dialysis patients. Failed dialysis surgeries occur in roughly 55% to 65% of patients with end-stage renal disease, according to the company. Caring for these patients can cost the Medicare and Medicaid Services system roughly $2 billion per year — and Bouré and Lucks believed that they’d come...
Tags: TC, Y Combinator, Medicine, Tech, United States, Medicare, Dallas, Nashville, Houston, Johnson, Core, Chief, National Science Foundation, Vanderbilt University, Medicaid Services, Department of Health and Human Services


Lilly Starts Phase 3 Trial for Antibody Treatment of COVID-19

Eli Lilly a Phase 3 trial studying LY-CoV555 for the prevention of SARS-CoV-2 infection and COVID-19 in residents and staff at long-term care facilities in the U.S. (skilled nursing facilities,... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
Tags: Science, Technology, Medicine, World, Innovation, Eli Lilly, Lilly Starts Phase


Improving Olympic performance with asthma drugs?

One on hand, the most common health condition among Olympic athletes is asthma. On the other, asthmatic athletes regularly outperform their non-asthmatic counterparts.A new study assesses the performance-enhancement effects of asthma medication for non-asthmatics.The analysis looks at the effects of both allowed and banned asthma medications. The most common chronic disease among athletes competing in the Olympic Games is asthma. It's not a coincidence — asthma is a risk associated with activ...
Tags: Medicine, Fitness, Drugs, Sports, Asthma, Innovation, Performance, Wada, Athletes, World Anti Doping Agency Wada, MVC, WADA WADA


Sight Diagnostics raises $71M Series D for its blood analyzer

Sight Diagnostics, the Israel-based health-tech company behind the FDA-cleared OLO blood analyzer, today announced that it has raised a $71 million Series D round with participation from Koch Disruptive Technologies, Longliv Ventures (which led its Series C round)and crowd-funding platform OurCrowd. With this, the company has now raised a total of $124 million, though the company declined to share its current valuation. With a founding team that used to work at Mobileye, among other companies, S...
Tags: Health, Startups, TC, New York, London, Medicine, Cancer, Israel, Artificial Intelligence, United States, President, Healthcare, Food And Drug Administration, Disease, Machine Learning, Fda


What to Do if Your Health Insurance Drops Your Monthly Prescription

When you rely on costly prescriptions, few things are more alarming than learning your health insurance no longer covers it—and unfortunately, it happens more often than you may expect. According to new data from GoodRx, 15% of Americans have had at least one prescription dropped from their coverage over the past…Read more...
Tags: Medicine, Finance, Insurance, Health Insurance, Lifehacks, Prescriptions


How Do People Actually 'Die From Old Age'?

Thousands are currently engaged in solving the problem of death. Maybe they’ll succeed, and out of sheer boredom I’ll reread this sentence when I’m 900 years old, reflecting fondly on the first wasted century of my life. In the meantime, billions are going to die—some from disease, some in freak accidents, and a…Read more...
Tags: Death, Science, Biology, Medicine, Old Age, Disease, Dying In Your Sleep, Dying Of Old Age


Coronavirus: Why don’t people get sick despite being infected?

Even as others were dying of COVID-19, Rick Wright made phone calls to his business clients. He lifted weights, did pushups and glided on an elliptical trainer. Late at night, he took his dog on long walks. “I never felt sick. Not a cough, wheezing, headache. Absolutely nothing, “ said 63-year-old Wright of Redwood City, despite testing positive for the virus – 40 days, straight — after being exposed aboard the Diamond Princess cruise last February. Seven months into a pandemic that has kille...
Tags: News, Medicine, California, Massachusetts, California News, Sport, Soccer, Anthony Fauci, Brad Sherman, Stanford University, Lee, Wright, UCSF, Redwood City, Saharan Africa, UC San Francisco


House Dems Say Trump Admin Got Played for Chumps on $644 Million Ventilator Deal

The White House got duped into overpaying for ventilators by half a billion dollars in the first few months of the novel coronavirus pandemic, House Democrats alleged in an oversight subcommittee report released Friday.Read more...
Tags: Health, Science, Medicine, White House, House, Donald Trump, Peter Navarro, Pandemic, Coronavirus, Covid 19, Sars Cov 2, Ventilators, House Dems Say Trump Admin Got Played for Chumps


Genomics startup Helix receives $33 million in NIH funding to scale COVID-19 testing

The U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH) is revealing the first beneficiaries of its Rapid Acceleration of Diagnostics (RADx) program, and San Mateo-based Helix is on the receiving end of $33 million in federal funding as a result. Helix is a health tech startup founded in 2015 that focuses on insights derived from personal genomics, but the company has also developed a COVID-19 test that detects the presence of SARS-CoV-2 using RT-PCR methods. The funding will be used to support Helix’s ...
Tags: Health, TC, Science, Medicine, Tech, United States, Genomics, Helix, Fda, Biotech, Nih, San Mateo, EUA, National Institute of Health, U S National Institutes of Health NIH, Coronavirus


A Medieval Potion Proves Its Worth as an Effective Bacteria Killer

A 1,000-year-old recipe to treat eye infections could lead to an unorthodox way of combating antibiotic resistance.Read more...
Tags: Science, Medicine, Anthropology, Archaeology, Antibiotics, Middle Ages, Medieval Meds, Potions