Posts filtered by tags: Michel Foucault[x]


 

Checking in on your friends and coworkers isn't enough - here are steps you can take at work to help fight racial discrimination

A stop Asian hate rally following the violence in Atlanta, Georgia, on March 16, 2021. Zhao Gang/Xinhua Diksha Kale is a criminal defense attorney who researches gender studies and criminal law. She says it's important to do more than just mental health check-ins on your friends during violent times. Take action by demanding better policies and donating to or volunteering at organizations working on the ground. See more stories on Insider's business page. Recently, my friend and I...
Tags: Opinion, US, Trends, Strategy, Atlanta, Mental Health, United States, Violence, Donald Trump, Hate, Racial Discrimination, Nordic, Atlanta Georgia, Contributor, Michel Foucault, The Conversation


French philosopher Michel Foucault 'sexually abused boys in Tunisia': report

French-American professor Guy Sorman accuses fellow intellectual...
Tags: Tunisia, Michel Foucault, Guy Sorman


Watch Badiou, the First Feature-Length Film on France’s Most Famous Living Philosopher

Above you can watch Badiou, the first feature-length film on France’s most famous living philosopher. On the film’s accompanying website, the directors–Gorav Kalyan and Rohan Kalyan–write: Nietzsche wrote that all philosophy is a biography of the philosopher. The life of philosopher Alain Badiou suggests that the reverse of this is also true: from one’s life story, we might deduce an entire system of thought. From his birth in Morocco, to the events of May 1968 in Paris, to his twilight yea...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Film, College, France, Morocco, Paris, Philosophy, Facebook Twitter, Plato, Nietzsche, Michel Foucault, Alain Badiou, Michel Foucault Alain Badiou Judith Butler, Badiou, Gorav Kalyan


The Open Syllabus Project Visualizes the 1,000,000+ Books Most Frequently Assigned in College Courses

The Prince, The Canterbury Tales, The Communist Manifesto, The Souls of Black Folk, The Elements of Style: we’ve read all these, of course. Or at least we’ve read most of them (one or two for sure), if our ever-dimmer memories of high school or college are to be trusted. But we can rest assured that students are reading — or in any case, being assigned — these very same works today, thanks to the Open Syllabus project, which as of this writing has assembled a database of 7,292,573 different col...
Tags: Google, Education, College, Osama Bin Laden, Seoul, Martin Luther King Jr, David Foster Wallace, Aristotle, Donald Barthelme, Noam Chomsky, Facebook Twitter, Junot Diaz, Benedict Anderson, Strunk, George Jackson, Edward Said


The Time Machine

Long Now co-founder Brian Eno in front of his 77 Million Paintings generative artwork (02007). Editor’s Note: This paper was sent our way by its lead author, Henry McGhie. It was originally published in Museum & Society, July 2020. 18(2) 183-197. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License. No changes have been made.  The Time Machine: challenging perceptions of time and place to enhance climate change engagement throu...
Tags: Art, UK, New York, Texas, London, Climate Change, Australia, Future, US, Society, Unesco, Britain, Commerce, Paris, Manchester, United Nations


A Mysterious Monolith Appears in the Utah Desert, Channeling Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FU0i9VvPmoY People do weird things in the desert. A spokesman for the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources acknowledges that widely understood truth in a recent New York Times article about a mysterious monolith discovered in Red Rock Country. “A team that was counting bighorn sheep by helicopter spotted something odd and landed to take a closer look,” writes Alan Yuhas. “It was a three-sided metal monolith, about 10 to 12 feet tall, planted firmly in the g...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, Utah, London, College, United States, New York Times, Stanley Kubrick, New Mexico, Cia, Seoul, Indiana Jones, Death Valley, Facebook Twitter, Utah Department of Public Safety


"Therapeutic Discipline: Drug Courts, Foucault, and the Power of the Normalizing Gaze"

The titl of this post is the title of this notable new article available via SSRN and authored by Michael Sousa. Here is its abstract: Drug treatment courts represent a paradigm shift in the American criminal justice system.  By focusing on providing drug treatment services to low-level offenders with severe use disorders rather than sentencing them to a term of incarceration, drug courts represent a return to a more rehabilitative model for dealing with individuals ensnared by the criminal jus...
Tags: Law, Foucault, Douglas A Berman, SSRN, Michel Foucault, Michael Sousa


11 types of sexualities and their meanings

People dance during the Youth Pride event as part of World Pride and Stonewall anniversary in New York, U.S., June 29, 2019. Reuters In June, the Supreme Court decided that antidiscrimination employment protections apply to those who identify as LGBT. That means that you cannot be discriminated against by your employer for your sexual identity. According to sexuality educator, writer, and consultant Jamie LeClaire, sexual identity is the "gender that you are attracted to, or if you are int...
Tags: New York, Supreme Court, Congress, Life, New York City, Trends, Strategy, Features, Gay, Netflix, United States, Playboy, Npr, Lists, Ellen Page, UC Davis


“Setting” Boundaries Versus “Negotiating” Boundaries

Is there a substantial difference? Or are they just two words for the same thing? And does it really matter? Prior to the 1950s, they would have been just two words for the same thing. That is, if anyone ever used the term “negotiating” boundaries. The practice of “negotiating” boundaries comes primarily out of the 1980s with the flattening of business hierarchies and the strong orientation to women’s rights. With the exception of sales negotiation, it was rare to talk about negotiating relation...
Tags: Politics, Careers, Ronald Reagan, Collaboration, Genentech, Foucault, Conversational leadership, Power and influence, Michel Foucault, General Mills Honeywell, American Express vs First Bank One If


“Islands in a sea of disbelief” – Militant activism in Belgium, the Netherlands and Germany

It took us six years, but I’m very pleased to announce that, at last, our book: Islamic Militant Activism in Belgium, the Netherlands and Germany – ‘Islands in a sea of disbelief’ (Palgrave 2020) has been published. The book, written with my wonderful colleagues Carmen Becker and Ineke Roex, is a revised and updated version of our Dutch research report on Sharia4Belgium, Sharia4Holland, Behind Bars/Streetdawah, Millatu Ibrahim, Tauhied Germany, Die Wahre Religion and Einladung zum Paradies. Wher...
Tags: Activism, Germany, Iraq, Religion, Syria, Netherlands, Anthropology, Belgium, Headline, The Netherlands, The Hague, Foucault, NWO, Abu Muhammed, University of Amsterdam, Carmen Becker


An Introduction to Postmodernist Thinkers & Themes: Watch Primers on Foucault, Nietzsche, Derrida, Deleuze & More

For decades we’ve been hearing about the problem of Postmodernism. I suppose I get, in a vague sort of way, what people mean by this: moral relativism, mistrust of objectivity and scientific, religious, and other authorities, “incredulity toward metanarratives,” as Jean-Francois Lyotard defined the term in The Postmodern Condition in 1979. Don’t we find much of this radical skepticism in the work of David Hume? The Cynics? Or Nietzsche (a Postmodern ancestor, but also claimed by Pragmati...
Tags: Google, College, Rome, Philosophy, David Foster Wallace, Scott Moore, Walter Scott, Marx, Facebook Twitter, Foucault, Moore, Carlyle, Josh Jones, Jean François Lyotard, Nietzsche, David Hume


When John Maynard Keynes Predicted a 15-Hour Workweek “in a Hundred Year’s Time” (1930)

Image by IMF, via Wikimedia Commons That which stands first, and is most to be desired by all happy, honest and healthy-minded men, is ease with dignity. —Cicero, Pro Sestio, XLV., 98 There is much to admire in Roman ideas about the use of leisure time, what Michel Foucault referred to as “the care of the self.” The Latin words for work and leisure themselves give us a sense of what should have priority in life. Negotium, or business, is a negation, with the literal meaning of “the nonexistence...
Tags: Google, College, Economics, Chicago, Margaret Thatcher, Ronald Reagan, Npr, University Of Queensland, Imf, Bhutan, Facebook Twitter, Boston College, John Maynard Keynes, Josh Jones, Keynes, Buckminster Fuller


How working from home is changing our economy forever

The virus lurks on car door handles, on doorknobs and the floor, on the breath of others or in a friend’s hug, on onions in the supermarket, and on the hands of the valet who parks your car. If you venture outside, everything and everyone is a threat. So, it is better to stay home, safely locked away with your previously disinfected computer which connects you to a world that is innocuous because it’s virtual and therefore harmless. What makes you sick lurks outside your door. The fear of what w...
Tags: Google, Books, New York, Mexico, China, India, Chile, Korea, Venice, Foucault, David Harvey, Michel Foucault, Chris Montgomery, COVID, Zoomism, Fordism


Take a Virtual Tour of 30 World-Class Museums & Safely Visit 2 Million Works of Fine Art

Since the first stirrings of the internet, artists and curators have puzzled over what the fluidity of online space would do to the experience of viewing works of art. At a conference on the subject in 2001, Susan Hazan of the Israel Museum wondered whether there is “space for enchantment in a technological world?” She referred to Walter Benjamin’s ruminations on the “potentially liberating phenomenon” of technologically reproduced art, yet also noted that “what was forfeited in this process we...
Tags: Google, Art, College, Smithsonian, Taipei, Archives, New York Public Library, Whitney, British Museum, Stanford University, Metropolitan Museum Of Art, Facebook Twitter, Tate, Rosetta Stone, Cleveland Museum of Art, Vermeer


Jeremy Bentham’s Mummified Body Is Still on Display–Much Like Other Aging British Rock Stars

Plato’s ideal of philosopher-kings seems more unlikely by the day, but most modern readers of The Republic don't see his state as an improvement, with its rigid caste system and state control over childbearing and rearing. Plato’s Socrates did not love democracy, though he did argue that men and women (those of the guardian class, at least) should receive an equal education. So too did many prominent European political philosophers of the 18th and 19th centuries, who had at least as much...
Tags: Google, New York, London, College, France, Athens, Philosophy, Salvador Dalí, Leonard Cohen, Random, University College London, Metropolitan Museum Of Art, Atlas Obscura, University College, Facebook Twitter, Plato


"What expectations of privacy do friends and partners have a right to when hanging out with someone whose job or hobby it is to share everything about their day-to-day?"

"Where do we draw the line between self-expression and unwarranted exposure? If their friends are sharing every single day of their lives, can they reasonably expect to be asked for consent every single day?"Asks Hayley Phelan in "Will You Be My #Content?/For social media influencers and oversharers, life is full of material. But what if their friends don’t want to be the co-stars?" by (NYT).The answer to "If their friends are sharing every single day of their lives, can they reasonably expect t...
Tags: Instagram, Privacy, Law, Relationships, Blogging, Rape, Foucault, Ann Althouse, Michel Foucault, Garner (the Word, Hayley Phelan, Caroline Calloway


Architect makes playful puzzle pavilion for Design Week Mexico

At the 11th annual Design Week Mexico, Mexican architect Gerardo Broissin created the Egaligilo Pavilion, an eye-catching structure made with large jigsaw puzzle-shaped concrete pieces. Installed on the grounds of Mexico City’s contemporary art museum Museo Tamayo, the boxy pavilion draws the eye with its puzzle-inspired form and bubble-like protrusions designed to deliberately obscure views of the interior. Inside is a lush garden that remains exposed to the outdoor elements thanks to small sli...
Tags: Garden, Design, Mexico, Architecture, Gallery, Mexico City, Carousel Showcase, Pavilion, Michel Foucault, Parametric Architecture, Design Week Mexico, Experimental Architecture, Museo Tamayo, Gerardo Broissin, Broissin, Egaligilo


Watch “Critical Living,” a Stop-Motion Film Inspired by the 1960s Movement That Rejected Modern Ideas About Mental Illness

Along with Michel Foucault's critique of the medical model of mental illness, the work of Scottish psychiatrist R.D. Laing and other influential theorists and critics posed a serious intellectual challenge to the psychiatric establishment. Laing’s 1960 The Divided Self: An Existential Study in Sanity and Madness theorized schizophrenia as a philosophical problem, not a biological one. Other early works like Self and Others and Knots made Laing something of a star in the 1960s and early 70s,...
Tags: Psychology, Google, UK, London, College, Pennsylvania, Animation, British Army, Philosophy, Glasgow, Death Valley, Freud, Facebook Twitter, Foucault, Laing, Duquesne University


What Comedy Tells Us About Ourselves — And How We’re Changing

Scholar of comedy Matthew McMahan: “Just as Michel Foucault encourages historians to look to moments of rupture and discontinuity when trying to decipher how a culture thinks and acts, I suggest students of comedy look to the moments when a successful joke simply stops landing with its audience. The moment when a loud guffaw quickly shifts to an appalled gasp can tell us a lot about how a culture is changing.” – HowlRound
Tags: Art, Theatre, Audience, Michel Foucault, 02.14.19, Matthew McMahan


"Local authorities in southern China are investigating a popular coconut milk brand for once again claiming the drink would enhance women’s breasts...."

Sixth Tone reports.Coconut Palm...  has often attracted eyeballs and ire because of its sexist advertisements and provocative packaging claiming their coconut concoction makes women “curvier” and gives them “bigger breasts.”...The drink’s latest advertisement has also angered its loyal consumers, with many calling it “obscene” and “tasteless.” The latest social media furor comes two years after Coconut Palm was attacked for a similar advertisement, which also claimed its product could enhance a ...
Tags: Law, China, Advertising, Breasts, Bad Science, Harry Nilsson, Foucault, Galen, Ann Althouse, Michel Foucault, William Coles, Coconuts, Seen And Unseen


Michel Foucault Offers a Clear Introduction to His Philosophical Project (1966)

Theorist Michel Foucault first “rose to prominence,” notes Aeon, “as existentialism fell out of favor among French intellectuals.” His first major work, The Order of Things: An Archaeology of the Human Sciences, proposed a new methodology based on the “disappearance of Man” as a metaphysical category. The ahistorical assumptions that had plagued philosophy made us too comfortable, he thought, with historical systems that imprisoned us. “I would like to consider our own culture,” he says ...
Tags: Google, College, Philosophy, Berkeley, UC Berkeley, Death Valley, Facebook Twitter, Foucault, Josh Jones, Aeon, Durham NC Follow, Michel Foucault, Human Sciences, Pierre Dumayet


Michel Foucault Offers a Clear, Compelling Introduction to His Philosophical Project (1966)

Theorist Michel Foucault first “rose to prominence,” notes Aeon, “as existentialism fell out of favor among French intellectuals.” His first major work, The Order of Things: An Archaeology of the Human Sciences, proposed a new methodology based on the “disappearance of Man” as a metaphysical category. The ahistorical assumptions that had plagued philosophy made us too comfortable, he thought, with historical systems that imprisoned us. “I would like to consider our own culture,” he says ...
Tags: Google, College, Philosophy, Berkeley, UC Berkeley, Death Valley, Facebook Twitter, Foucault, Josh Jones, Aeon, Durham NC Follow, Michel Foucault, Human Sciences, Pierre Dumayet


Twelve philosophy books everyone should read: from Plato to Foucault [slideshow]

Every year the third Thursday in November marks World Philosophy Day, UNESCO’s collaborative “initiative towards building inclusive societies, tolerance and peace.” To celebrate, we’ve curated a reading list of historical texts by great philosophers that shaped the modern world and who had important things to say about the issues that we wrestle with today such as freedom, authority, equality, sexuality, and the meaning of life.  The Republic by Plato (427-347...
Tags: Books, Featured, Unesco, Slideshow, Philosophy, Geneva, Smith, Mary Wollstonecraft, Adam Smith, Plato, Foucault, Sartre, Locke, Simone, Hume, Mill


9 people who were way ahead of their time

Sometimes, people are so far ahead of the curve that it takes everybody else hundreds of years to catch up to their ideas.While many people are content to quietly sit back and flow with popular opinion, these nine thinkers let the world know what it was doing wrong, often with major consequences. These great thinkers remind us that taking an unpopular, bold stance might not be madness. It's been said that when you're one step ahead of the crowd you're a genius but that two steps ahead make you a...
Tags: UK, England, France, India, Religion, Society, Rome, Gay, United States, Feminism, Innovation, Literature, Philosophy, Catholic, Gender Equality, Alexandria


This Week in Photography Books: Patrick Nagatani

  “If fiction has given more to us than fact, then this is the greatest truth.” Ryoichi/Patrick Nagatani   There’s no such thing as truth. That’s what they teach you in college or grad school, anyway. Ever beholden to the French Philosophical titans Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida, endless professors teach countless students that each piece of information is inextricable from the power dynamics that created and disseminated it. It is the ultimate example of occupying the intellectual high gr...
Tags: Photography, Denver Nuggets, Earth, United States, Bill Clinton, Nba, Secret Service, Lebron James, New Mexico, Grand Canyon, Orwell, Ucla, James, Photography Books, Trump, Flint


A New Academic Hoax–Complete with Fake Articles Published in Academic Journals–Ventures to Show the “Corruption” of Cultural Studies

We should be suspicious when researchers assume their conclusion; when the results of an academic study merely confirm the author’s pre-existing biases. Humans are wired to seek confirmation, a cognitive deficit so deeply engrained that it can be exploited among laypeople and specialists alike. Art historians have been fooled by forgeries, historians by fake manuscripts, and paleontologists by phony fossils. Physicist Steven Weinberg referenced such high-level hoaxes in a 1996 essay in The New ...
Tags: Google, Politics, Education, College, Harvard, Current Affairs, New York Times, Philosophy, Nyu, Noam Chomsky, McGill University, Facebook Twitter, Foucault, Josh Jones, Jacques Derrida, Yascha Mounk


Annette Michelson, 95, Pioneering Film And Art Critic

“It is difficult to overstate the many ways in which Michelson contributed to both the film and the art worlds. She was among the first to teach at New York University’s Cinema Studies department, which was among the first of its kind in the United States. And, with Rosalind Krauss, in 1976, she cofounded the journal October, which spurred on a widespread interest in critical theory — in particular the writings of French post-structuralists like Michel Foucault and Jacques Derrida — within the N...
Tags: Art, New York, People, United States, Jacques Derrida, Michel Foucault, Michelson, Annette Michelson, 09.17.18, New York University s Cinema Studies, Rosalind Krauss


The Moment Creates Animated Film for BBC Ideas Platform Based on Foucault’s Work

The Moment, a division of The Creative Engagement Group, has created a new film for the BBC Ideas online content platform, in conjunction with the philosopher Angie Hobbs and the Open University.The Moment worked closely with Angie Hobbs, Professor of the Public Understanding of Philosophy at the University of Sheffield, on the creative film. Hobbs wrote the script and performed the voiceover for the five-minute film, which examines the modern climate of contradictory information from the perspe...
Tags: Europe, Featured, Advertising, US, Bbc, Art and design, Hobbs, Philadelphia, United, University Of Sheffield, Foucault, Michel Foucault, The Moment, Angie Hobbs, Creative Engagement Group, Huntsworth plc


THE WAY IT SHOULD BE DONE: A NEW BOOK BY DEREK COLLER and BERT WHYATT

Before you read another word: if you know the remarkable work of Derek Coller and the late Bert Whyatt, you can skip to the bottom for details on how to buy it: you won’t need me to convince you of … Continue reading →
Tags: Wow, Bliss, Jazz, John Coltrane, Louis Armstrong, Jack Gardner, Bob Wright, Generosities, Hotter Than That, It's All True, Jazz Titans, The Heroes Among Us, The Real Thing, The Things We Love, Jazz Lives, Michael Steinman


When Jean-Paul Sartre Had a Bad Mescaline Trip and Then Hallucinated, for Years, That He Was Being Followed by Crabs

Image by Thierry Ehrmann via Flickr Commons Sometimes when confronted with strange new ideas, people will exclaim, “you must be on drugs!”—a charge often levied at philosophers by those who would rather dismiss their ideas as hallucinations than take them seriously. But, then, to be fair, sometimes philosophers are on drugs. Take Jean-Paul Sartre. “Before Hunter S. Thompson was driving around in convertibles stocked full of acid, cocaine, mescaline and tequila,” notes Critical Theory, Sartre al...
Tags: Google, College, Paris, Philosophy, Stephen, Death Valley, Thompson, Facebook Twitter, Sartre, Thierry Ehrmann, Sainte Anne, Jean Paul Sartre, FRANTZ, Simone de Beauvoir, Durham NC Follow, Michel Foucault