Posts filtered by tags: Miles Davis[x]


 

AmaWaterways: 2019 Smooth Jazz Christmas Markets River Cruise

HOLIDAY JAZZ CRUISE FEATURING JAZZ TRUMPETER RICK BRAUN Join AmaWaterways on December 13, 2019, for a swingin’ Magical Christmas Markets cruise! Discover the magic of the season with AmaWaterways aboard AmaSonata during a special holiday jazz cruise featuring smooth jazz trumpeter and producer Rick Braun! Enjoy four exclusive Rick Braun Unplugged performances as you sail for 7 nights along the Danube River from Vienna, Austria to Nuremberg, Germany, exploring Europe’s spectacular Christmas mark...
Tags: Travel, Europe, Featured, Blog, Miles Davis, Nuremberg, Regensburg, Rod Stewart, Chet Baker, Vienna Austria, Danube River, Rick, Nuremberg Germany, Clifford Brown, Freddie Hubbard, AmaWaterways


John, Bill and Wayne

In The Wall Street Journal this week, I interviewed Tony-winning playwright John Guare for my "House Call" column in the Mansion section (go here). John's works include The House of Blue Leaves, Atlantic City and Six Degrees of Separation. His new play, Nantucket Sleigh Ride, is at New York’s Mitzi E. Newhouse Theater at Lincoln Center Theater. Wait until you read about the man-cave beach house his father built in 1930 and how his parents inspired him to write plays. Here's John Guare on Six...
Tags: New York, Washington Post, New York Times, Jazz, Evans, Miles Davis, Vancouver, John, Sam, Wall Street Journal, Calgary, Don, Wayne, Tony, Buster Keaton, Harrison Smith


Joseph Scapellato's Playlist for His Novel "The Made-Up Man"

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book. Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Lauren Groff, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others. Joseph Scapellato's novel The Made-Up Man is one of the most fun books I have read all year, a smart and absurdist take on noir. NPR Books wrote of the book: "Joseph Scapellato's ...
Tags: Music, Chicago, David, Prague, Kendrick Lamar, Chicagoland, Miles Davis, Marilyn Manson, Lech, Atomic Books Comics Preview, Breeders, Central Pennsylvania, Los Angeles Review of Books, St Mary, Stanley, Manson


Jordan A. Rothacker's Playlist for His Story Collection "Gristle"

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book. Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Lauren Groff, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others. Jordan A. Rothacker's collection Gristle is filled with stories varied in style but similar in their empathetic characters and Thoracker's strong storytelling voice. In his own wo...
Tags: Music, California, Georgia, Spain, Pink Floyd, David, Paris, David Bowie, Ohio, Miles Davis, Jordan, Bjork, Woody Allen, Joni Mitchell, Giants, Nina Simone


"Silencing music by a dead person who committed crimes does nothing to stop those kinds of crimes from happening in the future."

"If we consistently threw out all music by people who once acted horribly, we’d have no John Lennon, no Beatles, no Miles Davis. Of course, the Beatles revolutionized rock and pop music, and Miles Davis revolutionized jazz. So we’d be left musically impoverished, just to make ourselves feel good."Writes my son John (at his blog post, "Should we stop listening to Michael Jackson?"), adding, "And yes, I am that guy!," linking to an Onion piece, "Man Always Gets Little Rush Out Of Telling People Jo...
Tags: Law, John Lennon, Miles Davis, John, Michael Jackson, Don, Caravaggio, Mary Magdalene, Martha, Ann Althouse, Domesticity


Birth of the West Coast Cool

In late 1949 and '50, the Miles Davis Nonet recorded 12 songs in New York that were arranged by Davis, Gil Evans, John Carisi, John Lewis and Gerry Mulligan. The music was unusual in that it seemed to apply the relaxed feel of the Claude Thornhill Orchestra to bebop. Of the dozen songs recorded in January 1949, April 1949 and March 1950, only six were released by Capitol in the 78rpm era. Jeru and Godchild were paired, along with Move and Budo from the January 1949 session; and Israel and Bop...
Tags: New York, Israel, Los Angeles, Davis, Jazz, Miles Davis, West Coast, Columbia, Columbia Records, Chet Baker, Capitol, Mulligan, Pete Rugolo, Venus de Milo, Gerry Mulligan, Haig


Before Miles Ahead + 19

One of Miles Davis's finest albums is Miles Ahead: Miles Davis +19, an orchestral jazz recording arranged and conducted by Gil Evans in May and August 1957. In many ways, the LP was jazz's first concept album. The music unfolds like a story and can only be heard from start to finish. As gentle and as seamless as this album is—with Evans's heaving orchestration and Davis's  innocent trumpet throughout—most of the music had already been recorded by other artists. To illustrate, I have recreated ...
Tags: Davis, Jazz, Evans, Miles Davis, Johnson, Cadiz, Don, Dave Brubeck, Miles Ahead, Pablo, J J Johnson, Kurt Weill, Ahmad Jamal, Bobby Troup, Gil Evans, Marc Myers


Ira Gitler (1928-2019)

Ira Gitler, a jazz author, journalist and producer who was a wealth of eyewitness knowledge and whose liner notes starting in the early 1950s appeared on more albums than many of the musicians he wrote about recorded, died on February 23. He was 90. Ira is perhaps best known for writing Leonard Feather's Encyclopedia of Jazz volumes starting in the 1950s. Each musician entry was concise and, at one point, included the addresses of the artists, presumably so that musicians, record labels and cl...
Tags: New York City, Jazz, John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Ira, Jackson, Coltrane, Garland, Charlie Parker, Barnes Noble, Mike Ricci, Leonard Feather, Trane, Bop, Sonny Rollins, Marc Myers


Tayari, Bix and Darlene

In The Wall Street Journal this week, I interviewed best-selling novelist Tayari Jones for my "House Call" column in the Mansion section (go here). Tayari is the author of An American Marriage, and we talked about her growing up in Atlanta and in Nigeria in the 1970s and how her crush on her school's marching-band drummer resulted in her becoming a writer. [Photo above of Tayari Jones at her Atlanta home by Fernando Decillis for The Wall Street Journal] Here's Tayari last year on CBS This Mo...
Tags: Nigeria, Billie, Los Angeles, Atlanta, Dave, Jazz, Marlon Brando, Cbs, Michael Caine, Miles Davis, Gillespie, Mansion, Oprah Winfrey, Wall Street Journal, Darlene Love, Michael


Tosh Berman's Playlist for His Memoir "Tosh: Growing Up in Wallace Berman's World"

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book. Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Lauren Groff, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others. Tosh Berman's memoir Tosh: Growing Up in Wallace Berman's World offers fascinating insight into the life of the author's artist father and the Beat and hippie art scenes of Los Ange...
Tags: Music, La, Wikipedia, Russia, Berlin, Los Angeles, San Francisco, James Brown, Neil Young, David, United States, Bob Dylan, Morocco, David Bowie, James Bond, Brian


The Messthetics Impress with Their Free-flowing Improvisation and Endless Experimentation

Drummer Brendan Canty and bassist Joe Lally are undeniably one of the most impressive rhythm sections in the rock world. Their work with Fugazi was nothing short of seminal, and created a template that many bands in the punk and hardcore scenes would follow. The two found a kindred spirit in experimental guitarist Anthony Pirog, and so this power trio became the Messthetics. In early 2018, the band released its debut, self-titled record, showcasing an excellent work of experimental, jazz-inf...
Tags: Music, UK, Review, Rock, Manchester, Newcastle, Fugazi, Miles Davis, Ama, Mason, Canty, Tyne, Lally, Hardcore, Anthony Pirog, Sonny Sharrock


Jenifer, Alice and Howard

In The Wall Street Journal this week, I interviewed actress-singer Jenifer Lewis for my "House Call" column in the Mansion section (go here). Jenifer talked about growing up poor in Kinloch, Mich., which at the time was one of the oldest all-black, self-governing municipalities in the country, dating back to 1890. Her childhood story was harrowing but how she broke through and triumphed is amazing. [Photo above of Jenifer Lewis at home in Sherman Oaks, Calif., by Shayan Asgharnia for The...
Tags: Hbo, New York, Broad City, Jazz, Miles Davis, Mansion, Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, Stockholm, Anthony Newley, Howard, Jim, Jenifer Lewis, Jane, Marc, Eric Dolphy


Art Farmer on Prestige: 1953-'55

Much attention by jazz fans has been paid to the Blue Note label, and deservedly so. But the first half of the 1950s really belongs to Bob Weinstock and Prestige. While Prestige album 10-inch covers weren't as beautifully designed as those by Paul Bacon at Blue Note, the music released on Prestige between 1951 and 1955 was far more significant.  The early 1950s was the dawn of the long-playing 33 1/3 record. The format was invented in 1948 by Columbia without any proprietary claims. Columbia e...
Tags: Paris, Beethoven, Jazz, Miles Davis, Columbia, Ascap, Tchaikovsky, Clifford Brown, Paul Bacon, Sonny Rollins, Marc Myers, Art Farmer, Prestige, Bob Weinstock, Gigi Gryce, Stan Getz Thelonious Monk


LATimes.com: 'Green Book' doesn't do justice to Don Shirley's brilliant musicianship

A scene from the film "Green Book." (Universal Pictures) Los Angeles Times By Anthony Weller Feb 03, 2019 The African American pianist Don Shirley wouldn’t be surprised that the country he loved was embracing a screen version of his prickly persona, “Green Book,” rather than grappling with the questions raised by his music. I cold-called Donald — “I’m not a Don; that’s a stage name” — in 1980, and for a few years, we were ...
Tags: Religion, America, Brooklyn, Yale, Manhattan, Miles Davis, Donald, Don, Carnegie Hall, Rachmaninoff, Stravinsky, Pensacola Fla, Ravel, Negro, William J Zick, Vernon Duke


7 Videos of French Vocal Groups

I love French vocalese groups that take on jazz of the 1950s. There's something about hearing the lyrics (in many cases written by Jon Hendricks) with a Parisian feel. Here are seven video clips of formidable French vocal groups in the style of Lambert, Hendricks & Ross: Here are the Blue Stars in 1956 singing George Shearing's Lullaby of Birdland, with Christiane Legrand in front at the opening singing the high notes... Here's Les Doubles Six in 1960 singing Quincy Jones's Meet B.B.... H...
Tags: Germany, Paris, Jazz, Croatia, Miles Davis, London Underground, Quincy Jones, Birdland, Perrin, Gil Evans, Marc Myers, Lambert Hendricks Ross, Jon Hendricks, Ward Swingle, Les Blue Stars, Les Double Six


Sundance Film Review: ‘Miles Davis: Birth of the Cool’

Miles Davis is the one jazz figure of the postwar era who had, and still has, the larger-than-life quality of a pop star. Other jazz artists, of course, became legends (Charlie Parker, John Coltrane, etc.), but Miles, like Picasso or Dylan, had a mystique rooted not just in his genius but in his cult of […]
Tags: Reviews, Miles Davis, Sundance film festival, Picasso, Miles, Dylan, Sundance Film Review, Miles Davis Birth of the Cool, Charlie Parker John Coltrane


Acid Testing the Revival of Psychic TV and Thee Temple ov Psychick Youth

None Over the past ten years, an arcane impulse has slowly re-emerged in underground music. Formerly content to survive on the fringes of various dark subcultures (and mostly in the basements of self-anointed purists), the occult and its signifiers—spanning design, text, and sonic elements—are now crawling out of the depths of the musical imagination, and reclaiming territory once ceded. This stygian urge, both ideological and artistic, is subtler than just love of the abject, and more purposef...
Tags: Feature, Music, UK, London, Australia, Video Art, America, San Francisco, Experimental, Chicago, Britain, Brooklyn, Miles Davis, Charles Manson, North America, Wikimedia


Michel Legrand (1932-2019)

Michel Legrand, a French pianist who began writing arrangements for jazz musicians in the early 1950s before becoming one of the new sophisticated sentimentalists of American film in the 1960s and beyond as a composer, arranger and conductor, died on January 26. He was 86. Legraand's jazz recordings began with Dizzy Gillespie and the Paris Operatic Strings in Paris in 1953 and then Blossom Dearie and Les Blue Stars mid-decade. His jazz turning point came in June 1958 when he recorded Legrand J...
Tags: New York, France, Paris, Jazz, John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Catherine Deneuve, Anthony Newley, Leslie Bricusse, Cherbourg, Dizzy Gillespie, Bill Evans, Birdland, Legrand, Blossom Dearie, Herbie Mann


Michel Legrand obituary

French composer, jazz musician and conductor who wrote the scores for more than 250 films including The Umbrellas of Cherbourg and YentlThe music of the composer, singer, arranger, conductor, jazz musician and producer Michel Legrand went on glowing long after many of the 250-odd films he had written soundtracks for had fallen by the wayside.Legrand, who has died aged 86, made deadpan reference to that phenomenon when he played at Ronnie Scott’s club in London in 2011 – announcing that it was hi...
Tags: Europe, Music, London, Film, France, Los Angeles, Culture, Pop and rock, Paris, Jazz, Miles Davis, Music TV, Barbra Streisand, Cherbourg, Dizzy Gillespie, Legrand


Richard, Rufus and Chick

In The Wall Street Journal this week, I interviewed Richard Carpenter for my "House Call" column in the Mansion section (go here). Richard, of course, is the surviving half of the Carpenters, the best-selling 1970s sunshine pop group. Richard's sister Karen died in 1983 at age 32 of heart failure brought on by anorexia nervosa. Richard and I talked about his early years growing up with Karen and how they became America's top pop group. I've been a big Carpenters fan since the early 1970s and...
Tags: Spotify, New York, London, California, America, Karen, Oscar, Jazz, Miles Davis, Mansion, Richard, Memphis, Wall Street Journal, Oberlin, Brien, Savoy


Urbie Green (1926-2018)

Urbie Green, one of jazz's smoothest and most polished trombonists who recorded more often than virtually any other post-war player, including Frank Rosolino, J.J. Johnson and Kai Winding, died on December 18, 2018. He was 92. Green's soft, yearning trombone on albums was unmistakable. His sound came off as a perfect high-register sigh, more akin to a vocalist than a horn player. His sultry solos stood out on albums ranging from Billie Holiday's Lady in Satin and Dizzy Gillespie's Gillespiana ...
Tags: Green, Jazz, Miles Davis, Sam, Miles Ahead, Dizzy Gillespie, Antonio Carlos Jobim, Bucky Pizzarelli, Milt Hinton, Rotterdam The Netherlands, John Bunch, Dave McKenna, Tom Mitchell, Marc Myers, Nick Stabulas, Oscar Pettiford


Don, Oscar and Aretha

In The Wall Street Journal this week, I interviewed Don Chadwick, co-designer of the Aeron chair, for my "House Call" column in the Mansion section (go here). The ergonomic Aeron was first introduced in the late 1990s. Instead of upholstery, the chair's seat and back are constructed of a tightly woven two-way suspension system. It feels like you're sitting in a taut net. Don started out as a kid building model planes.  Here's Don on the Aeron... SiriusXM. If you missed me on SiriusXM'...
Tags: Japan, New York, Aretha Franklin, House, Smokey Robinson, Jazz, Miles Davis, Mansion, Wall Street Journal, Baker, Kenton, Chet Baker, Don, Charlie Parker, Smokey, Kenny Rogers


Marci Vogel's Playlist for Her Novella "Death and Other Holidays"

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book. Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Lauren Groff, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others. Awarded the 2017 Miami Book Fair/de Groot Prize, Marci Vogel's novella Death and Other Holidays is a lyrical and thoughtful exploration of grief. NPR Books wrote of the book: "Dea...
Tags: Music, Bruce Springsteen, Hollywood, California, George Harrison, Los Angeles, Reagan, David, Gang, Va, Marilyn Monroe, John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Grinch, Joni Mitchell, Lapd


NAMM 2019: Here’s what to expect at this year’s show

Big name music festivals may attract tens of thousands of people in a given year, but where do the industry veterans who put on those festivals go when they’re looking for the latest trends and products in the music industry? To conventions such as the National Association of Music Merchants show in Anaheim. This year, 115,000 people are expected to enter the Anaheim Convention Center and surrounding venues Jan. 24-27 to see the show, which limits entry mainly to music industry professionals and...
Tags: Molly, Sport, Things To Do, Soccer, Miles Davis, Lucasfilm, George Lucas, Alice, Sphero, Woodstock, Elle King, Peter, Namm, National Association Of Music Merchants, Anaheim, Orange County Register


Dave Douglas Quintet's 'Brazen Heart: Live at Jazz Standard' Sits Cozily Next to Miles Davis' 'Plugged Nickel' Recordings

None Brazen Heart Live at Jazz Standard - Friday by Dave Douglas Quintet 2015 It is clearly raising expectations too high to compare this eight-CD live documentation of the November 2015 appearance of the Dave Douglas Quartet (his second) at New York's Jazz Standard to the Plugged Nickel recordings by Miles Davis's second quintet from 1965. But barely.Davis' band—the one featuring pianist Herbie Hancock, Ron Carter on bass, drummer Tony Williams, and saxophonist Wayne Shorter—was in the middle...
Tags: Music, New York, Review, Chicago, Davis, Jazz, Miles Davis, Music Review, Mitchell, Douglas, Linda, Garden State, Bill Evans, Wayne Shorter, Keith Jarrett, Tony Williams


Interview: Miles Davis, 1984

While Miles Davis was on tour in Baltimore in 1984, he agreed to appear on a daytime cable talk show called Cityline. For whatever reason, the hosts didn't bother to do a stitch of research and admitted as much to Davis. One of the hosts even asks Davis if he played with Charlie Parker. Astonished by the dopey questions, Davis eventually lets them have it. The interview is so bad, you see Davis start to feel sorry for them and those asking him silly questions on the show. Lazy hosts aside, Davi...
Tags: Davis, Jazz, Miles Davis, Baltimore, Charlie Parker, Marc Myers, Milan Simich


Check Out an Exclusive ‘If Beale Street Could Talk’ Vinyl Debut

One of the best movie scores of the year, Nicholas Britell‘s If Beale Street Could Talk, is receiving two gorgeous new vinyl releases from Lakeshore Records and Invada Records, and we have an exclusive look at the artwork below. The vinyl editions will be released in vintage period inspired album designs. Check out the art, and other details of the If Beale Street Could Talk vinyl release below. I recently wrote-up the Best Soundtracks of 2018, and Beale Street was #1. How could it not be? I...
Tags: Movies, Vinyl, John Coltrane, Miles Davis, North America, Jezebel, Nina Simone, Puerto Rico, Lakeshore Records, Nicholas Britell, If Beale Street Could Talk, Beale Street, Billy Preston, Soundtracks, Barry Jenkins, Britell


Jazz Today: Take 6 at 30—Still in Sweet Harmony

None The members of Take 6 come down the stairs at New York's Blue Note jazz club in November of 2018, wireless microphones in hand and creating a complete orchestra of funk with their voices as they walk. They're having fun. Alvin Chea's resonant bass thumps and leaps as vocal percussion clips and whooshes. They slide through a narrow aisle, brushing the backs of fans sitting at tables as they smile and then ease up onto a stage set with six stools and, almost an afterthought, a couple of keyb...
Tags: Feature, Music, New York, Washington, Alabama, Los Angeles, Paul Mccartney, Smithsonian, Manhattan, Jazz, Madonna, Brian, Miles Davis, Jordan, Iconic, Michael Jackson


John Lennon and Yoko Ono: Imagine / Gimme Some Truth

None From the time they met through at least the mid 1970s, John Lennon and Yoko Ono fancied themselves avant-garde artists, creators, influencers, and public icons. They certainly had a case, and part of the evidence for that is Imagine, the "video album" the pair made to accompany John's Imagine LP and Yoko's Fly LP, both released in 1971. The film came out the following year and is being included on this revamped video edition along with Gimme Some Truth, Andrew Solt's 2000 television docume...
Tags: Music, New York, Review, John Lennon, Rock, Pop, Yoko Ono, Paul Mccartney, Miles Davis, John, Music Review, Lennon, Phil Spector, Film Review, Don, Harrison


Gisele, Burt and Miles

In The Wall Street Journal this week, I interviewed supermodel Gisele Bundchen for my "House Call" column in the Mansion section on her childhood in Brazi (go here). She talked about growing up with five sisters remai  best friends today. Her parents did something right. Gisele was discovered by a model scout in a Brazilian mall when she was 14. While I had her, I asked Gisele for two Brazilian album recommendations. Here's Tribalistas (2002)... And here's Maria Gadú (2009)... Black...
Tags: Japan, New York, Toronto, Davis, Jazz, Cbs, Miles Davis, Mansion, Wall Street Journal, Dick, Kenton, York, Miles, Nichols, Giulietta, FRANKFURT Germany