Posts filtered by tags: Milgram[x]


 

The power of conformity: How good people do evil things

After World War II, many psychologists wanted to address the question of how it was that people could go along with the evil deeds of fascist regimes.Solomon Asch's experiment alarmingly showed just how easily we conform and how susceptible we are to group influence.People often will not only sacrifice truth and reason to conformity but also their own health and sense of right and wrong. It's the last question of the quiz, and Chloë knows the answer: it's Bolivia. Yes, it's definitely Bolivia....
Tags: Psychology, Germany, Innovation, Oxford, Panama, Bolivia, Shaun, Chloe, Stanley Milgram, Milgram, Zimbardo, Asch, Philip Zimbardo, Solomon Asch, Jonny Thomson, John Darley


Any interesting new insights about the interesting new folks tapped by Prez Biden for DEA and AAG positions at the Department of Justice?

As detailed in this press release, Prez Biden yesterday announced "His Intent to Nominate 11 Key Administration Leaders on National Security and Law Enforcement."  Two of the nominees could prove be particularly impactful in sentencing and other federal criminal justice reform arenas:  Anne Milgram, Nominee for Administrator, Drug Enforcement Administration, Department of Justice Anne Milgram has had a distinguished career as a state, local, and federal prosecutor.  As New Jersey’s Attorney G...
Tags: Law, Washington Post, US, United States, New Jersey, New Orleans, DEA, Louisiana, Department Of Justice, Biden, Justice Department, New Jersey State Police, Milgram, Morgan Lewis Bockius LLP, Douglas A Berman, AAG


The Perils of Obedience & How We Can Defend Our Freedom

The Perils of Obedience U.S.A. –-(Ammoland.com)- I had been saving the idea I put forth to you now for a rainy day.  I wanted to avoid scaring anyone as I challenged you to think properly through a subject fraught with controversy.  I personally see this very simply, but too few do.  As I pen notes such as these, I know I’m writing to an educated and steadfast crowd of patriots.  What I’m unable to quantify is just how deeply you all believe in your civil rights.  Scarce among you are those w...
Tags: Google, Guns, Ben Franklin, Yale, Liberty, Capitol Hill, Benjamin Franklin, Michael, Authority, Midwest, Andrew Napolitano, St Augustine, Iowa Firearms Coalition, Milgram, Augustine, Michael Ware


The Perils of Obedience & How We Can Defend Our Freedom ~ VIDEO

The Perils of Obedience & the Milgram Experiment U.S.A. –-(Ammoland.com)- I had been saving the idea I put forth to you now for a rainy day.  I wanted to avoid scaring anyone as I challenged you to think properly through a subject fraught with controversy.  I personally see this very simply, but too few do. As I pen notes such as these, I know I’m writing to an educated and steadfast crowd of patriots.  What I’m unable to quantify is just how deeply you all believe in your civil rights.  Scar...
Tags: Google, Human Rights, Guns, US, Ben Franklin, Yale, Liberty, Capitol Hill, Benjamin Franklin, Michael, Authority, Midwest, Andrew Napolitano, St Augustine, Iowa Firearms Coalition, Milgram


The 3 Types of Humility That Impact Your Leadership

IN 2016, Harvard Business School Dean Nitin Nohria addressed the graduating class and spoke of three H’s: Hope, Humility, and Honor. These three qualities are reflected in leaders who make a difference. In speaking about hope, he turned to the example of explorer Ernest Shackleton, who, in a seemingly hopeless situation, “continued not only to remain optimistic himself, but he continually instilled hope in his crewmates. He refused to let them give in to the despair that logic would lead them t...
Tags: Leadership, Ernest Shackleton, Instagram and Facebook, Harvard Business School, Milgram, Leadership Development, Harvard Business School Dean Nitin Nohria


The Streamer’s Guide to March 2020: What to Watch at Home to Prepare For This Month’s Theatrical Releases

(Welcome to The Streamer’s Guide, a new monthly feature recommending at-home viewing options from filmmakers with new movies arriving in theaters this month.) March is when the movie year feels like it really kicks off in earnest. The studios start putting their best foot forward, not just taking out their trash. The indie labels put out some of prior year’s festival hits that weren’t quite built for an Oscar run – but are nonetheless incredibly impressive titles. Last year’s films finally star...
Tags: Amazon, Movies, Disney, America, Features, United Kingdom, New Zealand, Brazil, Mulan, Ken-Loach, Cillian Murphy, Lucy, Cannes, Bernie Sanders, John Krasinski, Todd Haynes


Watch Footage from the Psychology Experiment That Shocked the World: Milgram’s Obedience Study (1961)

For decades following World War II,  the world was left wondering how the atrocities of the Holocaust could have been perpetrated in the midst of—and, most horrifically, by—a modern and civilized society. How did people come to engage in a willing and systematic extermination of their neighbors? Psychologists, whose field had grown into a grudgingly respected science by the midpoint of the 20th century, were eager to tackle the question. In 1961, Yale University’s Stanley Milgram began a...
Tags: Psychology, Google, College, Jerusalem, Montreal, Yale University, Facebook Twitter, Adolf Eichmann, Eichmann, Stanley Milgram, Milgram, Hermann Rorschach, Hannah Arendt, Carl Gustav Jung, Ilia Blinderman


Podcast #568: The Untold Story Behind the Famous Robbers Cave Experiment

In the summer of 1954, two groups of 8- to 11-year-old boys were taken to a summer camp in Oklahoma and pitted against each other in competitions for prizes. What started out as typical games of baseball and tug-of-war turned into violent night raids and fistfights, proving that humans in groups form tribal identities that create conflict.  This is the basic outline of a research study many are still familiar with today: the Robbers Cave experiment. But it’s only one part of the story.  My gu...
Tags: Podcast, Life, Michael Strahan, Oklahoma, William Golding, Gina, Milgram, JCP, Sherif, Gina Perry, Muzafer Sherif, Robbers Cave, Gina Gina


bots and spam

Every fortnight I curate some of the observations and insights that were shared on social media. I call these Friday’s Finds. Not in a box. Not with a fox. Not in a house. Not with a mouse. I would not [retweet] them here or there. I would not [retweet] them anywhere. I would not [retweet the bots and spam]. I do not like them, Sam-I-Am. —@CAFinUS We give newspapers a free pass by calling them “the tabloid press”, as if the problem is the format. It’s not. The problem is the ownership. We shoul...
Tags: Sam, eLearning, Perry, Stanley Milgram, Milgram, Friday's Finds


Milgram-Experiment 2.0: Wenn Gehorsam anderen Menschen schadet

Wer hätte gedacht, dass genau die Eigenschaften, die gesellschaftlich hoch angesehen sind, mit einem zerstörerischen Verhalten einhergehen können? Alles, was es dafür braucht, ist anscheinend eine Autoritätsperson, die dieses Verhalten anordnet. In den 1960ern offenbarte das Sozialexperiment von Stanley Milgram, wie einfach es für Menschen in einer autoritären Rolle ist, das Verhalten von anderen zu beeinflussen. In der Studie sollten Proband*innen auf Anordnung einer Autorität ihn...
Tags: Fashion, Music, Auch, Sinn, Rolle, Kinder, Jahren, Stanley Milgram, Alles, Milgram, Dann, Appell, Stelle, Macht, Situationen, Stromschlägen


Economist Tim Harford just launched a new podcast, 'Cautionary Tales'

In "Cautionary Tales," economist Tim Harford explores why humans are so susceptible to con artists. In the podcast's first episode, Harford uses a famed oil tanker spill to highlight how important it is to admit mistakes. Future episodes compare the Oracle at Delphi with computer algorithms and a famous awards show messing up the envelopes. None Humans are susceptible to cons. We're even more likely to fall for larger-than-life personalities. This isn't me writing about the vague "other humans"...
Tags: Psychology, Berlin, US, Iran, Sociology, Innovation, Philosophy, Cornwall, Michael Lewis, Malcolm Gladwell, Personal Growth, Derek, Delphi, Tim, John Maynard Keynes, Herman


Cautionary Tales: a new podcast that tells the intriguing stories of historical "mishaps, fiascos and disasters"

Economist, author, podcaster and radio presenter Tim Harford (previously) has a fantastic new podcast: Cautionary Tales, which Tim describes as "Eight stories of mishaps, fiascos and disasters - served with a twist of nerdy social science." I've just listened to the second episode, The Rogue Dressed As a Captain (MP3), which uses the story of the amazing con artist Wilhelm Voigt as a jumping off point for understanding the nuance of Hannah Arendt's "Eichmann in Jerusalem," the Milgram obedi...
Tags: Post, Happy Mutants, News, Podcasts, Audio, Jerusalem, Spoken word, Narrative, Tim, Harford, Tim Harford, Eichmann, Milgram, Hannah Arendt, Social Science, Wilhelm Voigt


How Conformity Can Be Good and Bad for Society

In the U.S. Federal court system, many important cases go through three-judge panels. The majority opinion of these panels carries the day, meaning that having a majority is crucial for one side or another to get the rulings they want. So, if two out of three of the judges are appointed by Democrats, it’s safe to assume that most cases will go their way. But a study of the judicial behavior of the District of Columbia Circuit came to a surprising conclusion: A panel of three GOP-appointed judge...
Tags: Parenting, California, Senate, Barack Obama, Gop, House, Jane Austen, Donald Trump, Watts, Cass Sunstein, Stanley Milgram, Milgram, Sunstein, Duncan Watts, District of Columbia Circuit


the confinement of curriculum

For the past several weeks I have spent an afternoon in a fifth grade classroom with 30 students, aged 11-12 years old. My wife is artist-in-residence for this class and I, along with a few other adults, am her helper. The students are making ‘trash art’, recycling everyday items into new creations. It has been a pleasure watching the students envision,  problem-solve, and create. The class time passes in the blink of an eye. But there is one aspect of public school that I find extremely frustra...
Tags: Learning, Abc News, eLearning, Milgram, John Taylor Gatto, Brian Alger, Stager, Gary Stager, Albert Canyon


Podcast: What Do We Really Mean by “Moral Character”?

 We’ve all heard the term “moral character” at some point in our lives, but what do we really mean by it? Are morals and character two different things? Is this something that exists only in the abstract, philosophical sense, or something that can be shown in everyday life? Our guest approaches these questions and more in this week’s episode. Subscribe to Our Show! And Remember to Review Us! About Our Guest Christian B. Miller is the ...
Tags: Psychology, Amazon, General, Wales, Nazis, Rome, Cinnabon, Jewish, Vincent, Miller, Brain And Behavior, Ethics & Morality, Gabe Howard, University of Kansas, Vince, Gabe


We need disagreeable people to fix our dishonest institutions

Eric Weinstein is a mathematician, economist and managing director of Thiel Capital.In a recent interview with Rebel Wisdom, Weinstein spoke about the origins of the Intellectual Dark Web, and his theory of how our institutions are plagued by an "embedded growth obligation."Disagreeable people, Weinstein says, could help institutions correct themselves. None We are living in a fever dream from which we cannot wake up, and it is because we cannot figure out whom to trust, says Eric Weinstein, a m...
Tags: Psychology, Corruption, Politics, Media, Society, Innovation, Eric Weinstein, Don, Weinstein, IDW, Stanley Milgram, Wile, Milgram, Solomon Asch, Thiel Capital In, Thiel Capital This


Through the Looking-Glass of Black Mirror's 'Bandersnatch'

None Spoilers ahead. In 1983 I played an arcade game called Dragon's Lair. In what was already a video-game cliché, a knight named Dirk the Daring attempted to rescue Princess Daphne. But the selling point was not the story—it was that it looked like a cartoon. Meanwhile, on my Atari back at home, the similarly-themed Adventure featured a protagonist who was literally just a dot. After losing a week's worth of quarters within a minute, though, I realized that Dragon's Lair was not really a game...
Tags: Google, Feature, Books, Music, Video Games, Drama, Film, Sci-fi, Netflix, George Orwell, New York Times, Dragon, Mystery, Philip K Dick, Black Mirror, Charlie Brooker


AIs as Substitute Decision Makers

Ian Kerr For the Symposium on The Law And Policy Of AI, Robotics, and Telemedicine In Health Care. “Why, would it be unthinkable that I should stay in the  saddle  however much the  facts  bucked?” -  Ludwig Wittgenstein, On Certainty We are witnessing an interesting juxtaposition in medical decision-making. Heading in one direction, patients’ decision-making capacity is increasing , thanks to an encouraging shift in patient treatment. Health providers are moving away fro...
Tags: Canada, Ibm Watson, Jack, Blackstone, Branding, Guest Blogger, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Richards, University of Ottawa, Canada Research Chair, Fuller, Stanley Milgram, Astra Taylor, Milgram, Ryan Calo, Ian Kerr


What are we like? 10 psychology findings that reveal the worst of human nature

It's a question that's reverberated through the ages – are we humans, though imperfect, essentially kind, sensible, good-natured creatures? Or deep down are we wired to be bad, blinkered, idle, vain, vengeful and selfish? There are no easy answers and there's clearly a lot of variation between individuals, but this feature post aims to shine some evidence-based light on the matter. Here in the first part of a two-part feature – and deliberately side-stepping the obviously relevant but controvers...
Tags: Psychology, New York, Sex, Stanford, Future, Evil, Cnn, Innovation, Philosophy, Emotions, Morality, Donald Trump, Humanity, Cornell, Trump, Don


Podcast #445: How to Close the Character Gap

Are people mostly good or mostly bad? We’re apt to think of ourselves as good people, while thinking of the general population as not-so-stellar. My guest today argues that most people, including yourself, are really best described as a mixed bag. His name is Christian Miller, he’s a professor of moral philosophy and religion at Wake Forest University, and today on the show we discuss his new book The Character Gap: How Good Are We? We begin our conversation discussing how Christian defines...
Tags: Podcast, Life, Ben Franklin, Christian, Start, Milgram, Wake Forest University, Christian Miller, Twitter Christian


Small-Screen Stream: The Fantastic Final Season of ‘The Americans,’ Jim Halpert: Action Star, and More

(Welcome to Small-Screen Stream, a feature where we share the best television shows streaming and where you can watch them.) Anyone else feeling that late summer sadness? It’s not yet Halloween season, but the kids are back in school, the weather is evening out, and we’re about to lapse into the long slog of low temperatures and seasonal depression. If that’s a downer for you, worry not, because I’m here to offer a selection of streaming TV that will hopefully raise your spirits. I’ve gone ...
Tags: Television, Movies, Washington, Amazon Prime, Bbc, Features, Netflix, Guy Pearce, Jane Austen, Harry, Hulu, Ryan Murphy, Sarah Paulson, Bates Motel, Colin Firth, Tom Clancy


The Best, Craziest, and Bloodiest Movies from the Scary Movies XI Festival

Another week, another horror film festival in the books. It’s barely been 14 days since my Fantasia Film Festival recap highlighted the scariest and most splendid programming notes of Montreal’s three-week-long shindig, but that didn’t stop New York City’s Scary Movies XI from happening. Each August, the Film Society of Lincoln Center spooks Manhattan with a week-long curation of Halloween season holdovers as a gift to genre fans. It’s not as flashy or up-all-night as such all-encompassing e...
Tags: UK, Movies, Horror, Scotland, New York City, America, Features, Dead, Manhattan, Norway, Montreal, Anna, Jackie, Edgar Wright, Anderson, Jules


Immigration Officials at the Border and the Milgram Experiment

I thought immediately of the Milgram experiment when I saw this interview with Tom Homan the Acting Director of Immigration and Customs Enforcement. Watch the head of ICE pause when asked by @wolfblitzer if the policy of separating children from their parents is humane. https://t.co/gX0UN7dnrW pic.twitter.com/W4rhUjiO0g — The Situation Room (@CNNSitRoom) June 19, 2018 In 1961 and 1962, social psychologist Stanley Milgram wanted to know if average Americans would follow the orders of an autho...
Tags: Psychology, Health, Immigration, Gop, Ice, Refugees, Infertility, Homan, Stanley Milgram, Milgram, Tom Homan, Milgram Experiment, Customs Enforcement Watch the head of ICE, Milgram Milgram


7 Dreadful Psychological Experiments (and why science may have benefited from them)

When it comes to psychological experiments the period spanning the 40 years or so after the end of World War II was nothing short of scary. Scientists were physically administering electric shocks to people with sometimes, high doses of electricity, putting others (often children) through severe mental and physical trauma and abusing animals to an extent that doesn’t even bare thinking about fopr a compassionate human being. We also had the authorities at Harvard turning a blind eye to experimen...
Tags: New York, Stanford, Nazis, Harvard, Lifehacks, Martin Luther King, Princeton, Life Coaching, Trump, Eagles, Kaczynski, Elliott, Walter Mischel, Kitty Genovese, Ted Kaczynski, Adolf Eichmann


Interview with Jay Iorio

Jay Iorio is a technology strategist for the IEEE Standards Association, specializing in the emerging technologies of virtual worlds and 3D interfaces. In addition to being a machinimatographer, Iorio manages IEEE Island in Second Life and has done extensive building and environment creation in Second Life and OpenSimulator. What follows is an interview between Jay Iorio and Byron Reese, publisher of GigaOm, and author of the new book The Fourth Age: Smart Robots, Conscious Computers, and the F...
Tags: Google, Facebook, North Korea, China, New York City, Los Angeles, Blog, Siri, Seo, Intel, Intelligence, Jimi Hendrix, Austin, Bank, Ai, Banksy


Book Notes - Patrick Nathan "Some Hell"

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book. Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others. Patrick Nathan's novel Some Hell is an impressive and poignant debut. Kirkus wrote of the book: "A gripping account of the intricately woven mind of a teenager. . . . Nathan has c...
Tags: Music, Lana Del Rey, Minneapolis, California, David, David Bowie, Alan, David Lynch, Marilyn Manson, Bowie, Kirkus, Tom, Publishers Weekly, Atomic Books Comics Preview, Colin, Minneapolis Star Tribune


The Milgram Experiment, Submission to Authority, Your Life, and Career

The world is, quite simply, a jungle. You have your strong species and your weak species. You have your strong people and your weak people. Strong people impose their will on the weak and make the weak act in ways that benefit the strong. In the animal kingdom, for example, the strong apes have access to the best mates, the most food, and the best lifestyle. The weaker apes fear them. The stronger apes are strong based on their ability to intimidate and impose their will on the weaker apes, thei...
Tags: Careers, Yale University, Stanley Milgram, Milgram, Milgram Study


'The Fear Factor' Explores the Impulse within Us All

Sometimes a book's success is not just the power of what it's trying to tell us. It can also be about the perfection of timing. This year will most likely be known as the year of the reckoning. Our stars might not have slipped over to the other side so much as burned out gloriously in front of us. The list of sexual indiscretions from allegedly trustworthy television personalities and elected politicians has expanded in a horrifying fashion, like bugs crawling out from under boulders. Cal...
Tags: Facebook, Music, America, Bill Cosby, Fear, Las Vegas, Nuremberg, Behavioral Psychology, Booker, Darwin, Altruism, Marsh, Potomac River, Newark New Jersey, Cory Booker, Skinner


New analysis suggests most Milgram participants realised the “obedience experiments” were not really dangerous

Fewer than a quarter Milgram's participants mentioned the importance of the experiment to justify their cooperation. By Christian Jarrett
Tags: Psychology, Social, Milgram


Interviews with Milgram participants provide little support for the contemporary theory of “engaged followership”

Fewer than a quarter Milgram's participants mentioned the importance of the experiment to justify their cooperation. By Christian Jarrett
Tags: Psychology, Social, Milgram