Posts filtered by tags: Moran Cerf[x]


 

A brain science expert shares his 30-second exercise to jumpstart your creative thinking at work

You may seem creative if you suggest doing something that breaks the mold, writes Moran Cerf. Eva-Katalin/Getty Images Moran Cerf, 42, is a professor of neuroscience and business at Kellogg School of Management and Northwestern University and the Alfred P. Sloan professor at the American Film Institute. Every week, he receives questions about the brain, psychology, business, and behavior via email from people who attend his talks; below are his answers to two recent questions. In today's c...
Tags: Psychology, Science, Trends, Strategy, Neuroscience, Creativity, REM, Q&a, Nordic, Northwestern University, Rapid Eye Movement REM, Kellogg School of Management, Alfred P Sloan, Deirdre Barrett, Moran Cerf, Contributor 2019


How to set realistic New Year's resolutions and actually stick to them in 2021, according to a neuroscientist

Getty Images Moran Cerf, 42, is a professor of neuroscience and business at Kellogg School of Management and Northwestern University and the Alfred P. Sloan professor at the American Film Institute. Every week, he receives questions about the brain, psychology, business, and behavior via email from people who attend his talks; below are his answers to two recent questions. In today's column, he covers how to use neuroscience to make effective New Year's resolutions and manage relationship...
Tags: Psychology, Hollywood, Relationships, Los Angeles, Trends, Strategy, Neuroscience, Nasa, Mars, Resolutions, Nordic, New Years Resolution, Northwestern University, Cardinals, Cubs, Kellogg School of Management


The psychology of giving great gifts: An expert shares science-backed hacks for making your holiday presents memorable even if you can't see your loved ones this year

Every week, Cerf receives questions about psychology, business, and behavior from people who email him after attending one of his talks. Courtesy of Moran Cerf Moran Cerf, 42, is a professor of neuroscience and business at Kellogg School of Management and Northwestern University and is the Alfred P. Sloan professor at the American Film Institute. Every week, he receives questions about the brain, psychology, business, and behavior via email from people who attend his talks; below are his a...
Tags: Hollywood, Trends, Research, Santa, Cerf, Alfred P Sloan, Moran Cerf, John Ruhlin, Moran Cerf Moran Cerf, American Film Institute Every


Why one neuroscientist never needs a menu

Moran Cerf leaves the decision to fate because it's better for his brain.
Tags: Living, News, Moran Cerf


A neuroscientist says you might be luckier than you think — here's how to find out

Some days, it feels like nothing goes your way. Others, the sun is always shining. Neuroscientist Moran Cerf has been studying decision-making for over a decade, and his research has shown him that far more people are in the second camp of people than the first. Along the way, he's developed a tested method that helps him appreciate all the times he is lucky. Here's how he does it.  SEE ALSO: A neuroscientist who studies decision-making reveals the most important choice you can make Become awar...
Tags: Trends, Cerf, Moran Cerf, Business Insider Start


LeadershipNow 140: November 2017 Compilation

Here are a selection of tweets from November 2017 that you might have missed: How Leaders and Their Teams Can Stop Executive Hubris by Jonathan Mackey and Sharon Toye via @stratandbiz How to Succeed in Business (According to a 15th Century Trade Merchant) via @HBSWK Neuroscientists have identified how exactly a deep breath changes your mind by Moran Cerf The Right and Wrong Way to Apologize and Why It Matters by @LollyDaskal Culture Leadership Charge – A Crisis of Respect by @scedmonds 5 Ti...
Tags: Facebook, Leadership, America, Kay Peterson, LeadershipNow 140, Shane Parrish, Scott Mabry, Jon Mertz, Moran Cerf, Jonathan Mackey, Sharon Toye, StanfordBiz Jim Collins, Ways Executives Can Champion Lifelong Learning


Advertisers can target you psychologically based on a single Facebook like, study finds

A new study finds one Facebook like is all it takes for advertisers to tailor ads to your psychological profile. Targeting ads this way resulted in a 40% jump in clicks and 50% jump in purchases. The findings could be used for unethical purposes, but they could also help people live better lives, the lead author said. Personalizing Facebook ads based on a user's psychological profiles — not just their demographic traits, such as age or gender — can significantly increase the chance they'll c...
Tags: Facebook, UK, Steve Jobs, Trends, Bill Gates, Northwestern University, Cerf, Matz, Columbia Business School, Sandra Matz, Moran Cerf, Personalizing Facebook


I took a neuroscientist's advice for saving money and it's transformed my finances

Personal finance has always been a struggle for me, and it's led to poor confidence that I could afford even small purchases. One conversation with a neuroscientist about how humans make decisions turned that all around. Creating a budget that standardizes my spending into a weekly chunk now has me feeling more confident than ever. After years of feeling like my finances controlled me, and not the other way around, I'm happy to report I have found the solution in the wisdom of a neuroscienti...
Tags: Trends, Northwestern University, Cerf, Moran Cerf


How to Be Happy: Stop Making So Many Decisions, Neuroscientist Says

Making choices is hard. That would be why researcher Moran Cerf has eliminated it from his life. As a rule, he always chooses the second menu item at a restaurant.
Tags: Science, Moran Cerf


A neuroscientist explains how to fix your bad habits and save more money

Budgeting apps and spreadsheets may help people get their finances in order, but neuroscientist Moran Cerf says there is a simpler way to save more money: Live life on one financial timeline. Consider a typical American consumer. She gets paid twice a month, pays her bills once a month, goes grocery shopping maybe four times a month, eats three meals a day, and pays off her college loans over 20 years. "All those metrics confuse our brain," Cerf, an assistant professor of marketing at Northwe...
Tags: Trends, Yellowstone National Park, Northwestern University, Cerf, Moran Cerf


A neuroscientist who studies decision-making reveals the 6 most important choices you can make

Neuroscientist Moran Cerf has made a living studying how people make choices. Turns out, humans are pretty lousy decision-makers. We fall victim to bias, let emotions cloud our judgment, and tire of making choices pretty quickly. But Cerf has also learned that making a handful of really smart choices at the right moment can eliminate the need to make hundreds of smaller, nagging choices. Here are Cerf's recommendations for living a happy, successful, stress-free life.SEE ALSO: A neuroscientist w...
Tags: Trends, Cerf, Moran Cerf


A neuroscientist reveals his strategy for making himself luckier

If you want to be a lucky person, it helps to know what luck looks like. According to Northwestern University neuroscientist Moran Cerf, the way to become a luckier person is to keep a running list of times luck was (and was not) on your side. More often than not, Cerf has found, the times you got lucky will outnumber the unlucky moments. Cerf has studied decision-making for over a decade, and he's learned, among other things, that free choice is a terrible predictor for happiness. Humans fall v...
Tags: Trends, Northwestern University, Cerf, Moran Cerf


A neuroscientist who studies decision-making reveals the most important choice you can make

According to Moran Cerf, a neuroscientist at Northwestern University who has been studying decision-making for over a decade, the surest way to maximize happiness has nothing to do with experiences, material goods, or personal philosophy. It's all about who you decide to spend time with. But "it's not just advice to choose your friends carefully," Cerf told Business Insider. There are two premises that lead Cerf to believe personal company is the most important factor for long-term satisfaction....
Tags: Trends, Northwestern University, Cerf, Moran Cerf


A neuroscientist explains why he always picks the 2nd menu item on a list of specials

Moran Cerf is the opposite of a picky eater. For the past year, whenever the Northwestern University neuroscientist has gone out to eat, he's automatically selected the second menu item on the list of specials, no matter what it is. "Sometimes it's a big failure, but sometimes it's also a big failure when I choose myself," he said.  Cerf researches decision-making — specifically, how the brain works in the moments right before a decision is executed. His work has given him an understanding of ho...
Tags: Facebook, Mark Zuckerberg, Trends, Harvard, Northwestern University, Cerf, Moran Cerf