Posts filtered by tags: Movie Reviews[x]


 

‘Mangrove’ Review: Steve McQueen Stages a Riveting Courtroom Drama on the Front Lines of History [NYFF 2020]

There have been a lot of conversations about Black pain as of late, whether in the news or in the movies. How do you thoughtfully depict it? Where is the line drawn? I’m far from an expert on the topic, but it seems to me that Steve McQueen, in Mangrove, the second of his Small Axe films, has found at least one answer: counterbalance that Black pain with Black joy. Set in 1968 Notting Hill, Mangrove is a snapshot of a pivotal turning point in the civil rights movement in the U.K.: the trial ...
Tags: London, Movies, Features, Movie Reviews, Steve-McQueen, Caribbean, Black, Mcqueen, Frank, Wright, Kirby, Notting Hill, Darcus Howe, Mangrove, NYFF, Malachi Kirby


‘Inconvenient Indian’ Review: An Illuminating Documentary About Cultures Often Ignored [TIFF]

In 2012 Thomas King published The Inconvenient Indian: A Curious Account of Native People in North America , a compendium of his writings about what it means to be Native, and the types of stories both ascribed to, and told by, the various individuals broadly contained within the aboriginal rubric. Michelle Latimer’s documentary, simply titled Inconvenient Indian, takes the themes of King’s work, narrated in part by his own words, and showcases a kaleidoscopic vision beyond the stereotype, ...
Tags: Movies, Toronto, Features, Movie Reviews, North America, King, Horn, Film Festivals, Latimer, Flaherty, Thomas King, Kent Monkman, Featured Stories Sidebar, Alethea Arnaquq Baril, Michelle Latimer, Inconvenient Indian


‘Get the Hell Out’ Review: A Wild and Bloody Slice of Mayhem That Desperately Needs a Live Audience [TIFF]

During these times of social-distancing, it’s impossible to know how Get The Hell Out , part of the 2020 Toronto International Film Festival’s Midnight Madness slate, would have played to a boisterous and welcoming crowd. It’s fair to say it would have been a lot more fun with the rote dialogue being overpowered by hoots and screams, and the wrestling maneuvers cheered like at some mad luchador match. Instead, at home, the experience of sitting through the film is middling at best. That’...
Tags: Movies, Toronto, Features, Movie Reviews, Wang, Film Festivals, Scott Pilgrim, Featured Stories Sidebar, Get the Hell Out, Hsiung Megan Lai, Wang Bruce Ho


‘Enemies of the State’ Review: A Conspiracy Theory Becomes a Family Affair [TIFF]

We live in a time that fetishizes a post-truth. In our post-fact world, suspicion of institutions is at an all time high, and citizens on both left and right find ways to pretzel themselves into believing in grand conspiracies as the mundane facts of incompetence and hubris feel too constrained for the magnitude of our society’s problems. Sonia Kennebeck’s documentary Enemies of the State, about a hacker kid, his crusading parents, and a tenacious legal system, brilliantly undermines these imp...
Tags: Movies, Mexico, Toronto, Features, Movie Reviews, Canada, James Bond, Cia, Enemies Of The State, Wikileaks, Chelsea Manning, State, PAUL, Matt, Errol Morris, DeHart


‘The Truffle Hunters’ Review: A Wonderful Story of Driven Men, Rich Ingredients, and Very Good Dogs [TIFF]

Michael Dweck and Gregory Kershaw have crafted a near fairy tale look at the life of some irate Italians as they clamber through the forest seeking a delicacy that by weight is more valuable than gold. The Truffle Hunters is a beautiful, experiential documentary, taking you into a world that feels completely from another time. Shot over the period of several years with seemingly endless patience, Dweck and Kershaw’s film unfolds with scenes that appear as living paintings. Sharp stabs o...
Tags: Movies, Toronto, Features, Movie Reviews, Kershaw, Film Festivals, Dweck, Featured Stories Sidebar, Michael Dweck, Gregory Kershaw, The Truffle Hunters, Truffle Hunters


‘I Care a Lot’ Review: A Star-Studded Thriller That Fails on Every Possible Level [TIFF]

I did not care for I Care A Lot . J Blakeson’s tonally deft and awkward thriller begins by introducing us to Marla (Rosamund Pike), a taut, chilly figure tasked by the court to provide care to those who have fallen through the cracks. Ostensibly a legal guardian, Marla’s true motivation is to exploit the vulnerable, shack them up in assisted living homes while living off the proceeds. When one unstable son (Macon Blair) is unable to visit his mother, their violent and awkward confrontation ...
Tags: Movies, Toronto, Features, Movie Reviews, Northwest, Jennifer, Gonzalez, Pike, Film Festivals, Peter Dinklage, Dinklage, J Blakeson, Marla, Macon Blair, Wiest, Featured Stories Sidebar


LX 2048 Review: A Thought-Provoking Albeit Uninspired Sci-Fi Drama

Rating:  5/10 Cast: James D’Arcy as Adam Bird PB = PB || {}; PB.gptStandAlone = PB.gptStandAlone || {}; PB.gptAutoRefresh = PB.gptAutoRefresh || {'gptAds':[], 'gptStandAlone':[]}; admiralCookie = readAdmiralCookie(); googletag.cmd.push(function() { var standAloneSizeMapping = googletag.sizeMapping().addSize([0, 0], [[300, 250]]).addSize([750, 0], []).addSize([980, 0], []).build(); PB.gptStandAlone['pb_prebidjs_300x250_a_1601051360'...
Tags: Movies, Lx 2048, Movie News, Movie Reviews


‘The Trial of the Chicago 7’ Review: A Series of Fantastic Performances Elevate Aaron Sorkin’s Political Courtroom Drama

The Trial of the Chicago 7 is nothing if not a showcase for great performances. Writer-director Aaron Sorkin has his flaws – some of which are on display here – but one thing he does very well is creating the kind of punchy, snappy, rat-a-tat dialogue that good actors love to sink their teeth into. Some of that dialogue may not always sound natural – indeed, it often borders on speechifying. But Sorkin’s way with words, and a good actor’s talent for delivering those words, usually makes all the...
Tags: Movies, Drama, Aaron-Sorkin, White House, Features, Chicago, Netflix, Movie Reviews, United States, Eddie Redmayne, Mark Rylance, Michael Keaton, Justice Department, True Story, Mitchell, Nixon


Kajillionaire Review: A Wholly Original Work of Dramedic Art

Rating:  9.5/10 Cast: Evan Rachel Wood as Old Dolio Dyne PB = PB || {}; PB.gptStandAlone = PB.gptStandAlone || {}; PB.gptAutoRefresh = PB.gptAutoRefresh || {'gptAds':[], 'gptStandAlone':[]}; admiralCookie = readAdmiralCookie(); googletag.cmd.push(function() { var standAloneSizeMapping = googletag.sizeMapping().addSize([0, 0], [[300, 250]]).addSize([750, 0], []).addSize([980, 0], []).build(); PB.gptStandAlone['pb_prebidjs_300x250_a_...
Tags: Movies, California, Movie Reviews, Richard Jenkins, Wood, Gina Rodriguez, Melanie, Evan Rachel Wood, ComingSoon, Movie News, Carmen Sandiego, Dolio, Kajillionaire, Robert Richard Jenkins, Theresa Debra Winger, Old Dolio Evan Rachel Wood


‘Limbo’ Review: A Funny and Touching Tale of Immigration and Global Culture [TIFF]

Frank Zappa famously said “there is no Hell, there is only France.” If that’s true, there’s a strong case to be made that a bleak island off the Scottish coast may well be the perfect place to host purgatory. In Limbo , Ben Sharrokck’s dramedy about life as an asylum seeker, we get to spend time in this state between the horror of what’s been left behind and the interminable wait for what’s yet to come. This touching and provocative film (meant to play at Cannes 2020, and shifted to a TI...
Tags: London, Movies, France, Toronto, Turkey, Syria, Features, Movie Reviews, Frank Zappa, Cannes, Omar, Rachel, Chandler, Film Festivals, Limbo, Featured Stories Sidebar


‘The Father’ Review: Anthony Hopkins Gives One of His Greatest Performances in One of the Best Films of 2020 [TIFF]

One of the main joys of film festivals is to go into a film knowing as little as possible, guided by the hopes that the programmers have selected something worthy of your time. I’d missed Florian Zeller’s film The Father at its Sundance premiere, conflating it with another film about an ailing old-man as one of several dramas I skipped in order to focus on that fest’s remarkable doc slate. At TIFF I was allowed to finally dig into this movie, and it’s immediately become one of my favouri...
Tags: Movies, Toronto, Features, Movie Reviews, Williams, Olivia Colman, Anthony Hopkins, Film Festivals, Hopkin, Zeller, Florian Zeller, Rufus Sewell, Featured Stories Sidebar, The Father, Mark Gatiss Imogen Poots


‘On the Rocks’ Review: Bill Murray Reunites With Sofia Coppola for a Sparkling Father-Daughter Caper [NYFF 2020]

Bill Murray has become a kind of celebrity urban legend. He’s been known to crash weddings, join strangers’ karaoke sessions, or spontaneously begin bartending — building up a reputation as a sort of impish fairy man who will suddenly appear to give life-changing advice before flitting off to inject a little magic into the life of the next lost soul. It’s one of those fun Hollywood myths that might ring a little true, and it’s a persona that director Sofia Coppola taps into in her reunion with ...
Tags: Comedy, New York, Hollywood, Movies, Drama, New York City, Movie Reviews, Bill-Murray, Manhattan, Jones, Murray, Marlon Wayans, FELIX, Laura, Sofia-Coppola, Coppola


‘The Human Voice’ Review: Tilda Swinton Burns Up the Screen in Pedro Almodóvar’s English-Language Debut [NYFF 2020]

In his 40-year career, Pedro Almodóvar was never tempted by the allure of the Hollywood lights to direct an English-language film, like so many of his international compatriots. The Spanish auteur’s unique brand of candy-colored kitsch, of bold colors and even bolder emotions, would only be neutered under a Hollywood studio, which Almodóvar was probably well aware of. So it’s fitting that he would only cross the language barrier under his own terms, in isolation, with the short film The Human V...
Tags: Hollywood, Movies, Drama, Movie Reviews, Pedro Almodóvar, Penélope Cruz, Jean Cocteau, Almodóvar, Swinton, Short Films, NYFF, Tilda-Swinton, Featured Stories Sidebar, Human Voice, The Human Voice, Human Voice Review


‘Console Wars’ Review: A Fascinating, Fundamental Chronicle of the Innovative Battle Between SEGA and Nintendo

Though Atari was the first massively successful home video game system, a flood of terrible games, including the infamously awful E.T. video game, brought the industry crashing down in the early 1980s. But in 1985, the world of home video gaming was brought back from the dead thanks to innovation from Japan in the form of Nintendo. What followed was a massive behemoth of a video game company who dominated the entire market. Nintendo was raking in the dough and made it so that no other game syst...
Tags: Japan, Movies, Microsoft, Documentary, America, Features, Netflix, Movie Reviews, United States, Nintendo, Mario, Cbs, Atari, Barbie, Sega, Video Game


‘Ammonite’ Review: Kate Winslet and Saorise Ronan Lead a Chilly LGBTQ Drama [TIFF 2020]

In the windswept, dreary coastal English town of Lyme Regis lives Mary Anning (Kate Winslet), a paleontologist who searches on the muddy beaches for fossils such from prehistoric creatures that gives Ammonite its name. Living with her mother (Gemma Jones), the two run a tourist friendly shop peddling tiny rocks to those wanting to have a tiny sense of wonder. In her youth Mary found a particularly spectacular specimen, a nearly intact ichthyosaur, that’s on display without crediting the di...
Tags: Movies, Drama, Features, Movie Reviews, Kate Winslet, Gemma Jones, Charlotte, Mary, Lee, Winslet, Barry Lyndon, Ronan, Roderick, Francis Lee, Saorise Ronan, Featured Stories Sidebar


Enola Holmes review: Millie Bobby Brown, Henry Cavill find the fun in Sherlock’s world

Millie Bobby Brown makes a strong case for a new film franchise in portraying the teenage sister of Sherlock Holmes in this Netflix original movie.
Tags: Trends, Netflix, Movie Reviews, Sherlock Holmes, Sherlock, Holmes, Movies & TV, Millie Bobby Brown, Enola Holmes, Millie Bobby Brown Henry Cavill


‘Night of the Kings’ Review: Neon’s Latest Acquisition Title is a Thrilling Ode to Storytelling’s Power [TIFF 2020]

Champions of art love to pontificate about its importance, especially during times like a pandemic. But that rhetoric might ring a little hollow right now. However, it’s not an exaggeration to say that humans as a species are hardwired for storytelling. There’s science to back up the capability to narrativize our experience as necessity, not merely a luxury. As innate as our impulses for violence and destruction is our drive to create and narrate. This becomes all too apparent for the young man...
Tags: Movies, Toronto, Features, Movie Reviews, Kings, Ivory Coast, Maca, Roman, Blackbeard, Film Festivals, Featured Stories Sidebar, Philippe Lacôte, Koné Bakary, Night of the Kings, Phillipe Lacôte, Steve Tientcheu


‘The Water Man’ Review: David Oyelowo Makes His Directorial Debut With a Wholesome Adventure [TIFF 2020]

“Anything that basically is overtly celebrating darkness and to be perfectly honest, sanctioning it,” David Oyelowo told NPR in 2015, “that’s something I can’t personally do […] I know that films affect and shape culture, and I want to put stuff in the world that I feel is edifying as opposed to stuff that is detrimental.” As Oyelowo steps behind the camera for his feature directorial debut, it’s helpful to keep the star’s words in mind. The Water Man is nothing if not a brand extension for his...
Tags: Movies, Toronto, Features, Movie Reviews, Npr, Spielberg, David Oyelowo, Amos, Jo, Oyelowo, Film Festivals, Spielbergs, Gunner, Rosario-Dawson, Featured Stories Sidebar, Lonnie Chavis


‘Lovers Rock’ Review: The Exuberant First Film in Steve McQueen’s ‘Small Axe’ Anthology Gets You In the Mood [NYFF 2020]

Lovers Rock comes in waves — waves of joy, waves of sensuality, waves of dread, waves of wild, shuddering fervor that only begins to wane once the dim light of morning starts to shine through. Taking place entirely over the course of one night, this first film in Steve McQueen’s Small Axe anthology, which charts the lives and London’s West Indian community between 1968 and 1985, is a swooning mood piece that seduces and disarms you until you’re happy to let it lap over you, floating in the warm...
Tags: London, Movies, Drama, Movie Reviews, Steve-McQueen, Mcqueen, Franklyn, Martha, Courttia Newland, Gaspar Noé, NYFF, Wong Kar Wai, Featured Stories Sidebar, Lovers rock, Small Axe, Amarah Jae St Aubyn


‘Falling’ Review: Viggo Mortensen’s Directorial Debut is a Total Disaster [TIFF 2020]

“Sorry to bring you into this world just to die.” So begins Falling, Viggo Mortensen’s frustrating and flawed father/son drama that demands rather than earns empathy from its deeply unlikeable central character and his near saintly son. Told over two timelines, Mortensen’s script (and directorial debut) shows Willis as a young father (Sverrir Gudnason) and an elderly, sundowning parent (Lance Henriksen). Whether being an obnoxious, abusive prick decades ago or an aggressively homophobic sh...
Tags: Movies, Toronto, Features, Movie Reviews, David Cronenberg, John, Viggo Mortensen, Falling, Willard, Willis, Mortensen, Film Festivals, Henriksen, Linney, Lance Henriksen, Featured Stories Sidebar


‘Summer of 85’ Review: Young Love Burns Brighter Than Dark Noir [TIFF 2020]

As far as ‘80s-set, sun-soaked European summer romances where a young gay man comes to understand his sexuality, Call Me By Your Name still reigns supreme. (A high bar, to be clear!) But if this extremely specific subgenre is to become a thing, François Ozon’s Summer of 85 is a worthy entry. While the film does struggle a bit with some jumbled tonality, the latest work from the famously prolific French filmmaker strikes a new and surprisingly stirring combination of steamy and sweet thanks to t...
Tags: Movies, Toronto, Features, David, Movie Reviews, Alex, Francois Ozon, Ozon, Film Festivals, Lefebvre, David Gorman, Featured Stories Sidebar, Jérémie Renier, Summer of 85, TIFF 2020, Félix Lefebvre


’76 Days’ Review: This Documentary About the Early Days of COVID-19 is the Most Frightening Movie of the Year [TIFF 2020]

Forget anything in the genre-centric Midnight Madness slate: the documentary  76 Days is the horror film of TIFF 2020. Tracing the COVID-19 outbreak in a Wuhan medical facility for the duration of that city’s lockdown, it manages in a concise and remarkable way to illustrate not only the ravages of this new virus but how its effects continue to resonate no matter the political forces looking to downplay its risks. This is not only one of the most unvarnished, most unsentimental looks at ...
Tags: Movies, Toronto, Features, Movie Reviews, Wuhan, Film Festivals, Featured Stories Sidebar, Weixi Chen, 76 Days, Hao Wu Esquire


‘Shadow in the Cloud’ Review: Chloë Grace Moretz Battles Sexists and Gremlins in This Goofy World War II Horror Movie [TIFF 2020]

Shadow in the Cloud kicks-off with an amusing Looney Toons-style cartoon about a lazy, drunken World War II pilot blaming “gremlins” for all his problems. It’s cheeky and funny, and it starts things off on the right foot. “Ah-ha!” you think. “This movie is going to be fun!” Spoiler alert: it’s not. Sure, there are attempts at fun here. There are long, implausible action beats (one character actually falls out of a plane only to be blasted back into the plane by an explosion below – an explosion...
Tags: Movies, Horror, Toronto, Features, Movie Reviews, Chloe Grace Moretz, Maude, Max Landis, Landis, Ripley, Film Festivals, Moretz, Ce, Action/Adventure, Featured Stories Sidebar, Shadow in the Cloud


‘Violation’ Review: An Unflinchingly Brutal, Needlessly Muddled Story of Trauma and Revenge [TIFF 2020]

Rage, betrayal, confusion, and bloodshed are the driving factors of Violation, an unflinchingly brutal, often quite gruesome story of a woman who goes to extreme lengths following a terrible incident. Writer-directors Madeleine Sims-Fewer and Dusty Mancinelli do not shy away from the violence, employing meticulously crafted practical effects to portray a jaw-dropping series of events. But while there’s genuine dreamy-nightmarish artistry on display here, there’s also a scattershot approach that...
Tags: Movies, Horror, Toronto, Features, Movie Reviews, Alfred Hitchcock, Violation, Dylan, Miriam, Film Festivals, Ce, Mancinelli, Featured Stories Sidebar, Madeleine Sims, TIFF 2020, Dusty Mancinelli


‘MLK/FBI’ Review: An Infuriating Look at J. Edgar Hoover’s Attempt to Stop Martin Luther King [TIFF 2020]

There’s a dark shadow cast over the life and career of J. Edgar Hoover, the infamous FBI Director who created the G-Man persona and ruled the Bureau with an iron fist for over four decades. Even if you want to overlook the unconfirmed rumors, the fact remains that for all his righteousness, Hoover did not do things by the book. He made the rules up as he went along, and bent them to suit his own needs. And when it comes to Martin Luther King, Jr., it’s common knowledge that Hoover despised the ...
Tags: Movies, Documentary, Toronto, Features, Fbi, Movie Reviews, United States, Martin Luther King, Memphis, King, Martin Luther King Jr, Hoover, James Comey, Trump, Bureau, Robert F Kennedy


‘Concrete Cowboy’ Review: A Predictable But Strong Father-Son Story [TIFF 2020]

Outside of overpriced carriage rides through historic areas, you might not expect to see horses galloping through the streets of Philadelphia. But there’s a century-long tradition of Black horsemanship in the City of Brotherly Love, primarily in the Strawberry Mansion neighborhood located east of Fairmount Park in North Philadelphia that persists to this day. This relatively unknown, but very real scenario is the backdrop for Concrete Cowboy, Ricky Staub‘s somewhat by-the-numbers, but still sha...
Tags: Movies, Drama, Toronto, Features, Movie Reviews, Paris, Philadelphia, Detroit, Harp, North Philadelphia, Strawberry Mansion, Elba, Fairmount Park, McLaughlin, Film Festivals, Cole


‘Good Joe Bell’ Review: Mark Wahlberg’s Anti-Bullying Drama Has Nice Message, Muddled Execution [TIFF 2020]

Towards the end of Good Joe Bell, Mark Wahlberg’s titular character takes a load off his feet from his cross-country walk to condemn homophobic bullying. He sits down at a police station underneath pictures of Barack Obama and Joe Biden hanging on the wall. This bit of art direction reveals what should have been obvious from the film’s overall comportment: this is a period piece. America at large has experienced a dramatic shift in public attitudes towards the LGBTQ+ community even since the Ob...
Tags: Movies, Supreme Court, Obama, Reese Witherspoon, Toronto, America, Barack Obama, Joe Biden, Features, Green, Movie Reviews, Psa, Mark-Wahlberg, Joe, Film Festivals, Wahlberg


‘Pieces of a Woman’ Review: Vanessa Kirby Delivers a Career-Best Performance in a Tragedy That Never Comes Together [TIFF 2020]

How do we begin to put ourselves back together after everything falls apart? After our hopes and dreams suddenly go up in smoke? That’s the sort of question that lies at the heart of the often painful Pieces of a Woman, a stark tragedy awash in the harsh coldness of a Massachusetts winter. From director Kornél Mundruczó and writer Kata Wéber, this character study benefits from a career-best performance from Vanessa Kirby as Martha, a woman undone after the death of her baby. Any film dealing...
Tags: Movies, Drama, Boston, Massachusetts, Toronto, Features, Movie Reviews, Parker, Martha, Kirby, Shawn, Ellen Burstyn, Burstyn, Film Festivals, Ce, Kata Weber


Utopia season 1 review: A scary-good trip down a familiar rabbit hole

Amazon's Utopia delivers a conspiracy- and pandemic-fueled story that's highly entertaining, even when it hits close to home.
Tags: Trends, Movie Reviews, Utopia, Movies & TV, Amazon s Utopia


‘New Order’ Review: This Class Conflict Makes ‘Parasite’ Look Tame [TIFF 2020]

Class conflict in cinema is nothing new. Though after Bong Joon-ho’s Best Picture-winning Parasite became a global phenomenon, there’s perhaps never been a more receptive audience for films depicting a breakdown of unsustainable social contracts. (The ever-growing chasm of worldwide economic inequality unfortunately does not hurt, either.) Enter Mexican writer and director Michel Franco with New Order, a taut 88-minute dystopian drama about a country thrown into disarray amidst societal upheava...
Tags: Movies, Mexico, Toronto, Features, Movie Reviews, Mexico City, Franco, New Order, Picasso, Bong, Film Festivals, Bong Joon, Michel Franco, Rebeca, Featured Stories Sidebar, TIFF 2020



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