Posts filtered by tags: Music Review[x]


 

Buzzcocks' 'Love Bites' Is an Uneven, But Worthwhile, Listen

None Buzzcocks were undeniably one of the best bands to emerge from the late 1970s British punk scene. Still, unlike the Clash, the Sex Pistols, or Wire, they never produced a front-to-back great, non-compilation album. The stellar Singles Going Steady (1979), a remarkably coherent collection of UK A-sides and B-sides recorded between November 1977 and July 1979, one designed to build a US audience for the band, is one of rock's essential records. Even though they did their best work on singles...
Tags: Music, UK, Review, US, Music Review, Steve Garvey, Buzzcocks, Devo, SHELLEY, Steve Diggle, John Maher, Punk Rock, New Wave, Domino Records, Pop Punk, Pete Shelley


Buke and Gase Continue their Genre-Defying Education on 'Scholars'

It's often said that there are only two types of art—good and bad—and that rings especially true for music that more or less defies categorization. Such is the case with Buke and Gase, a New York duo comprised of Arone Dyer and Aron Sanchez who've been labeled as indie rock, "steampunk art-folk", and math rock, among other things. However, their latest LP, Scholars, most curiously and creatively exemplifies how they "make pop music in the most insane way possible". Filled with atypical instr...
Tags: Music, New York, Review, Experimental, Radiohead, Kate Bush, Music Review, Stereolab, Indie Pop, Gase, Dyer, Indie Rock, Gwen Stafani, Buke and Gase, Buke, Eisley


Toro y Moi Contemplates Late Capitalism on 'Outer Peace'

It didn't take long for chillwave to become a punchline after its rapid ascendancy in the late 2000s, and it must have been tough to be Toro y Moi (the alias of producer Chaz Bear, fka Chaz Bundwick), an act known synonymously, and perhaps unfairly so, with the genre. One of the first genres born almost entirely out of the influence of the Internet, chillwave was quickly deemed too easily replicable and far too reliant on provoking cultural nostalgia.But a few proprietors of the sound, like ...
Tags: Music, Review, Music Review, Abra, Toro Y Moi, Toro, Monte Carlo, Carpark Records, New House, Moi, Alan Palomo, Synthpop, Electropop, Chaz Bear, Bundick, Chillwave


Dave Douglas Quintet's 'Brazen Heart: Live at Jazz Standard' Sits Cozily Next to Miles Davis' 'Plugged Nickel' Recordings

None Brazen Heart Live at Jazz Standard - Friday by Dave Douglas Quintet 2015 It is clearly raising expectations too high to compare this eight-CD live documentation of the November 2015 appearance of the Dave Douglas Quartet (his second) at New York's Jazz Standard to the Plugged Nickel recordings by Miles Davis's second quintet from 1965. But barely.Davis' band—the one featuring pianist Herbie Hancock, Ron Carter on bass, drummer Tony Williams, and saxophonist Wayne Shorter—was in the middle...
Tags: Music, New York, Review, Chicago, Davis, Jazz, Miles Davis, Music Review, Mitchell, Douglas, Linda, Garden State, Bill Evans, Wayne Shorter, Keith Jarrett, Tony Williams


Frances Cone Awakens with Resourceful Confessions on 'Late Riser'

None In an industry focused on quick turnarounds and commercial expectations, Nashville singer-songwriter Christina Cone is an anomaly, as she chooses instead to wait and work patiently until her next artistic vision is fully realized. Hence the title of Late Riser, her soulful indie-pop full-length follow-up to 2013's debut album, Come Back. Recorded under her newfound guise, Frances Cone, and alongside her partner, "drummer-turned-bassist" Andrew Doherty, the relatable collection delivers its...
Tags: Music, Review, Arizona, Nashville, Music Review, Great Northern, Indie Pop, Doherty, CONE, Frances Cone, Andrew Doherty, Patti Griffin, Frances Cone Awakens, Christina Cone, Chopin Rufus Wainwright Justin Vernon


'It Won/t Be Like This All the Time' Is the Album the Twilight Sad Was Destined to Make

None Sometimes there exists such a definite, indestructible connective bond between band and fan, that it can feel as if both depend on the other for their very survival. For fans of Scottish band the Twilight Sad, this has been the case since their brilliant, 2007 debut, Fourteen Autumns and Fifteen Winter. The Twilight Sad have never been a band simply to like. No, they are a band to love, live in and learn from. These kind of relationships are special and when they're rewarded with the best ...
Tags: Music, Review, Time, Bbc, Graham, Dennis Hopper, Music Review, Arbor, Indie Rock, Macfarlane, Andy MacFarlane, Post-punk, Shoegaze, The Twilight Sad, James Alexander Graham, Lyrically Graham


The 1975 Try Everything on 'A Brief Inquiry Into Online Relationships'

None The 1975's third album, A Brief Inquiry Into Online Relationships, hit back in December 2018, just as we here at PopMatters were immersed in our wide variety of end of the year music lists. So we're circling back to what, almost by default, is one of the biggest rock acts in popular music right now. And a Brief Inquiry is big as well. In an era when most albums arrive in a streaming-friendly running time of 45 minutes or less, this record contains 15 tracks and lasts a full hour. And i...
Tags: Music, Review, America, Siri, Radiohead, Music Review, Richard Marx, Indie Pop, The 1975, Don, Indie Rock, Michael Bolton, Matt Healy, Healy, Mel Torme, Synthpop


Oneohtrix Point Never's 'Love in the Time of Lexapro' Is a Brief, Pleasant Aside

Daniel Lopatin's Oneohtrix Point Never has consistently delivered conceptually focused projects. Each full-length raptly developed a particular sonic aesthetic and theoretical imagination. For instance, his 2011 opus Replica stretches and staggers 1980s and '90s television advertisements, echoing capitalist jingles until they collapse into self-criticisms. Or, his 2015 medium bending campaign Garden of Delete collides innocent pop croons with the visceral strokes of grunge and metal, reliving ...
Tags: Music, Review, Music Review, Electronic, Ryuichi Sakamoto, Babylon, Lopatin, Oneohtrix Point Never, Sakamoto, Alex G, Daniel Lopatin, Oneotrix point never, Experiemental, Time of Lexapro


Deerhunter Ask 'Why Hasn't Everything Already Disappeared?'

None The title of Deerhunter's eighth album could be a kind of metaphysical question, but the record has an up-close material tone crackling with friction. Why Hasn't Everything Already Disappeared? wrestles with escapist and confrontational impulses, and continues the band's exploration of shifting sonic identity.Ten years ago, Deerhunter frontman and songwriter Bradford Cox was in the midst of what has so far proven to be his most prolific period. In 2008 alone, Cox put out Let the Blind Lead...
Tags: Music, Texas, Jimmy Fallon, Review, Music Review, Marfa, Deerhunter, Bowie, Cox, Allen, Indie Rock, Bradford Cox, Jo Cox, Tim Presley, Art Rock, 4AD Records


Whitehorse Returns with a New Addition to 'The Northern South'

None It's been more than two years since the Canadian folk rock duo Whitehorse released the EP The Northern South Vol. 1. The disc contained covers of past classics by legends like Robert Johnson, Willie Dixon, Howlin' Wolf, Jimmy Reed, and Chuck Berry. Melissa McClelland and Luke Doucet transformed these cuts into dirty, nasty, smoldering tracks that bled fire, flesh, and brimstone. The multi-instrumentalists played and sang as if possessed by the devil, the one that lives inside of us and per...
Tags: Music, Review, John, Music Review, Whitehorse, Rolling Stones, Etta James, Willie Dixon, Jimmy Reed, McClelland, St James Infirmary, Doucet, Blues Rock, Folk Rock, Six shooter records, Whitehorse Returns


'Springsteen on Broadway' Is Springsteen Fully Owning the Myth of the Working Class Hero

None The greatest rock and roll prognosticators of January 1973 probably would never have guessed how Bruce Springsteen was going to spend October 2017 through mid-December 2018. Of course, music scribes of that era were rarely prone to consider the potential scope of their fields of interest because that land was just being planted with bouquets of Berry, blankets of Beatles, rivers of Rolling Stones, avalanches of Animals, and dozens of Dylans crawling up from the depths just waiting for ...
Tags: Music, Usa, Bruce Springsteen, Review, Woody Guthrie, Barack Obama, Rock, Bob Dylan, New Jersey, Broadway, Marlon Brando, John Kerry, Music Review, Jay, Elvis, James Dean


Big Brother & The Holding Company Find 'Sex, Dope & Cheap Thrills'

None Fifty years ago, Big Brother & The Holding Company with lead singer Janis Joplin released their seminal record Cheap Thrills. The album was a runaway success and made Joplin a star because of her earthshaking renditions of such songs as George and Ira Gershwin's "Summertime", Big Mama Thornton's "Ball and Chain", and Jerry Ragovoy and Bert Berns' "Piece of My Heart". That music is still available today for streaming or purchase at many sites. This is something different.To celebrate the an...
Tags: Music, Review, San Francisco, Rock, Janis Joplin, Music Review, Mary, George, Joplin, Thornton, Janis, Jerry Ragovoy, Ira Gershwin, Bert Berns, Columbia Legacy Recordings, Blues Rock


John Lennon and Yoko Ono: Imagine / Gimme Some Truth

None From the time they met through at least the mid 1970s, John Lennon and Yoko Ono fancied themselves avant-garde artists, creators, influencers, and public icons. They certainly had a case, and part of the evidence for that is Imagine, the "video album" the pair made to accompany John's Imagine LP and Yoko's Fly LP, both released in 1971. The film came out the following year and is being included on this revamped video edition along with Gimme Some Truth, Andrew Solt's 2000 television docume...
Tags: Music, New York, Review, John Lennon, Rock, Pop, Yoko Ono, Paul Mccartney, Miles Davis, John, Music Review, Lennon, Phil Spector, Film Review, Don, Harrison


The Good, the Bad & the Queen  Tackle England, Englishness, and the Impact of Brexit on 'Merrie Land'

None Twelve years after the Good, the Bad & the Queen first appeared, the band returned with Merrie Land in late 2018, an album written and recorded in a reflection on England and Englishness following the Brexit vote in the summer of 2016. Damon Albarn, with Afrobeat drummer Tony Allen, Clash bassist Paul Simonon, and Verve guitarist Simon Tong, craft a dreary calm and downcast demeanor on Merrie Land and achieve no indication of diminishing output quality despite the album released barely six...
Tags: Europe, Music, England, Review, Wales, France, Scotland, Eu, Damon Albarn, Gorillaz, Music Review, Brexit, Alternative Rock, Allen, Albarn, Tony Allen


Deben Bhattacharya: Paris to Calcutta

None In many ways, musicologist Deben Bhattacharya stands as a direct predecessor to Sublime Frequencies, as one of the label's producers, Robert Millis, notes in his introduction to Paris to Calcutta: Men and Music on the Desert Road. While Sublime Frequencies' website states that its members are "dedicated to acquiring and exposing obscure sights and sounds from modern and traditional urban and rural frontiers", Bhattacharya refers in the notes to his 1956 LP to "a living tradition of folk mu...
Tags: Music, Review, France, India, Paris, World Music, Music Review, Calcutta, Desert Road, Bhattacharya, Robert Millis, Deben, Deben bhattacharya, Jharna Rose Bhattacharya, Deben Bhattacharya None Placing Bhattacharya


Frank Kimbrough: Monk's Dreams: The Complete Compositions of Thelonious Sphere Monk

None There was something in the air in the past year, and part of it was the recent centennial of the birth of pianist and composer Thelonious Monk. What else can account for the 2018 release of two very different recordings of Monk's entire catalog of published compositions, about 70 strong. The less obvious set was recorded by guitarist Miles Okazaki using no overdubs, a remarkable achievement. Pianist Frank Kimbrough has been a Monk fan and interpreter for decades—of course, what modern jazz...
Tags: Music, Review, Jazz, John Coltrane, Thelonious Monk, Music Review, Coltrane, Robinson, Drummond, Hackensack, Reid, Nellie, Maria Schneider, Elvin Jones, Okazaki, Scott Robinson


West African's Baba Commandant and the Mandingo Band Get Funky on 'Siri Ba Kele'

None Baba Commandant and the Mandingo Band exploded onto the international stage with 2015 debut Juguya, a fiery Afrobeat release that introduced the non-Burkinabé world to the distinctive growl of Baba Commandant – né Mamadou Sanou – and the tight grooves of his ensemble. On sophomore release Siri Ba Kele, that growl is back, and so is the musicianship, but the sounds here are very different. The band has stripped away much of the brass and heavy fuzz in favor of cooler aesthetics with just as...
Tags: Music, Review, World Music, West Africa, Burkina Faso, Music Review, Funk, Diabate, Moussa Doumbia, Baba commandant and the mandingo band, Siri Ba Kele, Baba Commandant, Juguya, Mamadou Sanou, Sanou, Issouf Diabate


Lubomyr Melnyk's 'Fallen Trees' Is a Thing of Uncommon Beauty

None Fallen Trees by Lubomyr Melnyk The title of Lubomyr Melnyk's latest album, Fallen Trees, is yet another sign he's been making throughout his career of the confluence of music and nature. On a long train ride through Europe, Melnyk observed a forest with several trees that had recently fallen. The image brought to mind both sorrow and hope. "They were glorious," he says. "Even though they'd been killed, they weren't dead."As is the case with Melnyk's music, Fallen Trees is the sound of sor...
Tags: Europe, Music, Review, Ukraine, Canada, Music Review, Classical, Philip Glass, Melnyk, Instrumental, Keith Jarrett, La Scala, Terry Riley, Minimalism, Erased tapes, Lubomyr Melnyk


British Indie Folkers Night Flight Have Created an Understated Gem with Their Debut LP

None London indie folk band Night Flight bring together their two superb, previously released EPs Wanderlust and Carousel along with two brand new tracks on their self-titled debut album. The result is a ten-track summation of the band's ability to craft timeless indie folk songs that demonstrate a classicist approach to songwriting, albeit one that places the songs firmly in the here and now.Lead by frontman Sam Holmes, the songs on Night Flight possess the similar deep, confessional quality o...
Tags: Music, London, Review, Wilco, Amsterdam, Music Review, Jeff Buckley, Don, Holmes, Indie Rock, John Martyn, Jonny Buckland, Sam Holmes, Holme, Night Flight, Indie folk


Hen Ogledd Concocts an Illusive Musical Haven Out of the Dissonance on 'Mogic'

None Hen Ogledd has always shown a proclivity for embracing the avant-garde. Entwining experimentation with distinct musical acumen, the British group has released their third full-length LP Mogic. A study in lyrical dexterity and sonic imagination, the band revels in their ability to make lush soundscapes out of discord. Hen Ogledd's moniker is derived from the Welsh name for the British Old North, an expansive region encompassing several kingdoms. An apt name for a band with equally wide-reac...
Tags: Music, Review, Experimental, Music Review, John Cage, Pilkington, Dawson, Richard Dawson, Bothwell, Rhodri Davies, Hen ogledd, Dawn Bothwell, Sally Pilkington, Mogic, Time Feel, Heddiw


There Is More Musicality to Be Found on 'Dummy Boy' Than Previous 6ix9ine Projects

None Hubris has been an integral part of the competitive braggery that has defined hip-hop lyricism for the best part of 40 years. Whether internalised by its espouser or merely rhetoric for the role, pomposity is part and parcel of a rapper's repertoire. However, the kind of aplomb possessed by Daniel Hernandez, known professionally as Tekashi 6ix9ine, or simply 6ix9ine, is atypically divisive.Hernandez didn't want to be a rapper and readily admits he's not even very good at it. He makes l...
Tags: Music, Review, Nicki Minaj, Fbi, Kanye West, Hip-hop, Jackie Chan, Music Review, Tim McGraw, Bébé, Bobby Shmurda, Scott Storch, Hernandez, Nelly, Storch, Waka


The Pollies Broaden Out Their Southern Rock Sound on 'Transmissions'

None Much gets made of Pollies leader Jay Burgess's Muscle Shoals, Alabama roots. And that makes plenty of sense; there's probably no way a musician grows up in the cradle of a world-changing sound without absorbing some of that famous vibe. But like a lot of modern Southern rock, the Pollies can't easily be tied down to any one school, be it big city, small town, college town, back porch, Shoals vibe, Florida swamp rock, or Memphis indie-by-way-of-Stax. In fact, if you want to namecheck Memphi...
Tags: Music, Florida, Review, Alabama, Wilco, Rock, Music Review, Memphis, Dylan Leblanc, Indie Rock, Pollies, Jon Davis, Southern Rock, The pollies, Jay Burgess, Nicole Atkins Burgess


The Rolling Stones Curate 'Confessin' the Blues'

None The blues' influence on rock 'n' roll is well documented. Likewise, the Rolling Stones' reverence for blues music is equally chronicled. Therefore, the compilation Confessin' the Blues makes sense. Attempting to refocus the public's attention onto the bluesmen who inspired the legendary rock band, the album is composed of classic blues tracks curated by the Rolling Stones. Part of the album's proceeds benefit Willie Dixon's Blues Heaven Foundation, an organization devoted to promoting blue...
Tags: Music, Review, Bbc, The Rolling Stones, Blues, Music Review, Ronnie Wood, Keith Richards, Robert Johnson, Dixon, Jefferson, Rolling Stones, Willie Dixon, Chuck Berry, John Lee Hooker, Howlin Wolf


audiobooks Could Use Some Editing on Their Latest Synthpop Album

None audiobooks is a London-based duo with a unique sound. Evangeline Ling handles the lyrics and most of the vocals, while David Wrench provides the music. That music is largely synth-based and on their debut album Now! (in a minute), it ranges from catchy pop to minimalist accompaniment to oppressive layers of sound. Ling is a storyteller, and many of the album's most interesting moments come when she is using songs to relate narratives. She's also a manic 21-year-old with a ton of energy...
Tags: Audiobooks, Music, London, Review, Pop, Austria, Swansea, Bjork, Music Review, Human League, Lewis, Jimmy, Ling, Heavenly Recordings, Synthpop, Electropop


Chic Were the Zenith of Disco

None One of the greatest losses I experienced as a result of sustaining injuries in 2012 was dancing. Spinal and feet damage have made it if not quite impossible then certainly much harder to graze a rug, never mind cut it. Listening to the glorious first three years of the Chic Organization's output, as presented in this box, forced me to confront that loss head-on. The best disco, and Chic were sometimes disco even though they transcended it, was highly sensual and absolutely thrilling to...
Tags: Music, Disco, Review, Diana, R&B, Khan, Music Review, Diana Ross, Nile Rodgers, Chic, Zenith, Risque, Funk, Norma Jean, Rodgers, Edwards


GWAR : The Blood of Gods

Despite the tragic death of lead vocalist Dave Brockie, a.k.a. Oderus Urungus, GWAR soldiers on. Brockie was largely responsible for the artistic and musical direction of the group and had the clearest idea of what he wanted GWAR to be. Note that he is the one in GWAR's classic interview with Joan Rivers who does most of the talking. With the band behind Brockie, the members would tend to come and go based on availability and interest, followed his vision. The questi...
Tags: Music, Heavy Metal, Joan Rivers, Music Review, Bishop, Trump, Mike Patton, Ac, Cross, Michael Bishop, Gwar, Dave Brockie, Blothar, Thrash Metal, Hardcore punk, Brockie


Andrew Bird: Echolocations: River

Violinist and experimental artist Andrew Bird has just released Echolocations: River , the second in a five-part series of instrumental releases documenting site-specific compositions based on the properties of various soundscapes. He created the first one, Echolocations: Canyon inside the Coyote Gulch canyons of Utah. The next three are tentatively entitled City , Lake, and Forest . He recorded River at the Los Angeles Riv...
Tags: Utah, Music, Andrew Bird, River, Bird, Music Review, Classical, Indie Rock, Los Angeles River, Folk Rock, Baroque pop


Beck: Colors

When Beck puts out a new album, the first thing that someone trying to understand it is likely to do is put it in a box. It's a temptation that Beck himself has fed into by making his albums thematically and sonically consistent statements, little snapshots in time that make sense when heard front to back. There's sad-sack Beck ( Sea Change , Morning Phase ), modern-rock Beck ( Guero , Modern Guilt ), hip-hop Beck, ( Mellow Gol...
Tags: Music, Beck, Wow, Music Review, Alternative Rock, Yacht Rock, Doobie Brothers, Hall Oates, Greg Kurstin, Kurstin, Art pop, Beck Mellow Gold Odelay, Beck Enjoy


Yasuaki Shimizu: Music for Commercials

There was a time before the advent of the ubiquitous pop song placement that television commercials relied on original music to underscore their products. Matching sound and vision to create a sense of need or want within the consumer is no easy feat – hence the overwhelming use of pop songs following Apple's hit after hit advertising its iPod and subsequent technological advancements. But when they do match up, they create a seamless blend of the visual, aural and compulsive ...
Tags: Apple, Music, Commercials, Jazz, Honda, Mariah, Music Review, Classical, Seiko, Ryuichi Sakamoto, BRIDGESTONE, Bach, Shimizu, Helen Merrill, Yasuaki Shimizu, Tv music


Sarah Ragsdale Presents Lovely Escapism in ‘This Kiss’

These days, the world is a dark, scary place. CNN alerts spike anxiety every two seconds, and sometimes even merely waking up in the morning and turning on the news is nerve-wracking. Unsurprisingly, most people find solace in music; it’s impossible to feel nervous or panicked when listening to a fun, upbeat, wholly positive tune – even if it’s just for a minute or two. New Jersey-by-way-of-Baltimore songstress Sarah Ragsdale‘s new single, “This Kiss” is exactly the salve needed to forgo those t...
Tags: Music, Cnn, New Jersey, Song, Music Review, Baltimore, Ragsdale, Betty Everett, Sarah Ragsdale, This Kiss



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