Posts filtered by tags: Napoleon III[x]


 

Hear the First Japanese Visitor to the United States & Europe Describe Life in the West (1860-1862)

“Oh, would some Power give us the gift / To see ourselves as others see us!” wrote poet Robert Burns. “It would from many a blunder free us, And foolish notion.” I cannot vouch for a being blunder-free, but reading historical accounts of our nation from foreign visitors does help to increase our worldly perspective, and hopefully question what often we take for granted. The 19th century was a particularly ripe time for the narratives, as oceanic commerce (and on its tail tourism) was mak...
Tags: Facebook, Europe, Japan, California, Youtube, College, France, America, San Francisco, History, Britain, United States, Portugal, Tokyo, Parliament, John Adams


Eye Prefer Paris Book of the Month, May 2021: Book Giveaway- Paris, City of Dreams

CORRECTION: Last Friday I posted that June 19 is when Americans will be able to visit France again, it's actually June 9. My apologies. My friend gifted me this wonderful and fascinating book, Paris, City of Dreams: Napoleon III, Baron Haussmann, and the Creation of Paris, and I am passing it on to you.   Acclaimed historian Mary McAuliffe vividly recaptures the Paris of Napoleon III, Claude Monet, and Victor Hugo as Georges Haussmann tore down and rebuilt Paris into the beautiful Ci...
Tags: Travel, Usa, France, Germany, Paris, Napoleon, McAuliffe, Victor Hugo, Claude Monet, Charles Baudelaire, Haussmann, Napoleon III, Richard Nahem, Paris City, Rosemary Flannery, Mary McAuliffe


Shopper’s Diary: A Poet-Collector Opens Pidgin in Upstate NY

At a time when so many of us are starved for inspirational browsing, news of Kostas Anagnopoulos’s recently-opened upstate New York antiques shop, Pidgin, sent ripples of excitement throughout the design world. Kostas himself could relate: since his purchase of a pelican-shaped Art Deco bottle opener at the age of 14 , he’s been on the hunt. “I think all antique and vintage dealers who go into business do so in part because they’ve been accumulating for so long that it’s just time to practice de...
Tags: Books, New York, Greece, Minneapolis, France, Toronto, Gifts, Chicago, New York State, Upstate Ny, Puglia Italy, West Side, Jesse, Upstate New York, Gonzalez, Transylvania


10 Easy Pieces: Classic Upholstered Arm Chairs

One of life’s necessities: A good upholstered arm chair for reading, sprawling, and dozing. Here are our nominations for best classic off-the-floor upholstered armchairs; we’ve purposely sorted for scale, favoring slimmer dimensions over space-hogging behemoths. Above: From Pinch in the UK, the Goddard Armchair comes in a range of upholstery options; £3,060 at Pinch. Above: The Fritillaria Chair by New York-based decoupage artist John Derian is based on an original Napoleon III-style pair of c...
Tags: Books, UK, New York, Cisco, Furniture, SCP, Napoleon III, 10 Easy Pieces, John Derian, Armchairs, Matthew Hilton, Lounge Chairs, Cisco Home, Maiden Home, Hans Olsen, Product Discoveries


Booze has a long history on the space station - even though NASA has banned drinking in space for almost 50 years

Researchers with Space Cargo Unlimited prepare bottles of French red wine to be flown aboard a Northrop Grumman capsule to the International Space Station, November 2, 2019. Associated Press Researchers sent red wine into orbit last year so astronauts could study how space affects it. It's not the first time booze launched into space: Russian cosmonauts have smuggled liquor into orbit, and NASA astronauts have occasionally indulged, though NASA banned drinking in orbit. More alcohol consu...
Tags: Europe, Elon Musk, Science, France, Virginia, Alcohol, Russia, Trends, Nasa, Earth, International Space Station, Virgin Galactic, Luxembourg, Wine, Mars, Astronauts


More at the Louvre

More photos from my trip to the Louvre: I walked through the former residence of Napoleon III. Very opulent. That chandelier was huge. Lots of gold. Quite a dining room. They had a great view. A nice way to display sculptures in this covered courtyard. These statues were once around a fountain.
Tags: Travel, Photos, Paris, Statues, Louvre, Louvre Museum, Chandelier, Napoleon III, OPULENCE


For Your Inspiration: 19 Home Offices We Love, Remote Work Edition

Like millions of quarantining families, for the past few weeks my husband and I have been working from home and our kids “distance-learning.” He and I, in general, don’t work well together (he’s on conference calls all day; I prefer to do my work while half-tuning in to the Brian Lehrer Show), nor do our sons (let’s just say one likes to hum and the other really, really doesn’t), so we’ve all retreated to separate corners of our house. My husband snagged the study as his remote office. Our 14-ye...
Tags: Home, Books, London, Matthew Williams, La, Toronto, Brooklyn, Paris, Ikea, John, Copenhagen, Modern House, Josh, Task Lighting, Valentin, Howe


Underrated arrondissements in Paris

Paris is made up of 20 distinct neighborhoods, or arrondissements, each with its own personality and charm. Many of the central arrondissements are famous among tourists for their monuments and museums but outside the highly trafficked, often touristy arrondissements there is a side of Paris that is completely underestimated. For those seeking a more local look at the French capital, these seven arrondissements are worth exploring. 10th Arrondissement Photo: Felix Lipov/Shutterstock The 1...
Tags: Travel, New York City, Paris, Bastille, Montmartre, Seine, Belle Epoque, All, Metro, Marcel Proust, Belleville, Louis, Jim Morrison, Paris Opera, Galeries Lafayette, Republique


Things to do in Querétaro, Mexico

Santiago de Querétaro , or Querétaro for short, is the capital city of the Mexican state of Querétaro. It’s among the most historical cities in the country, with a city center so beautiful and well-maintained that it has UNESCO heritage status for its Baroque-style Spanish colonial architecture. Where Mexico City is sprawling and can be overwhelming, Querétaro is approachable, walkable, and doable in a couple of days. If you’re an early riser and have a vehicle, it’s possible to do Querétaro a...
Tags: Travel, Mexico, San Francisco, Unesco, Egypt, Mexico City, Queretaro, Centro, Mexico Travel, All, Centro Historico, San Miguel de Allende, Queretaro Mexico, Napoleon III, Maximilian, Hernan Cortes


Macron berates Israeli security men in tussle at Jerusalem church

JERUSALEM (Reuters) - "Go outside," French President Emmanuel Macron demanded in English in a melee with Israeli security men on Wednesday, demanding they leave a Jerusalem basilica that he visited before a Holocaust memorial conference. The French tricolor has flown over the Church of St. Anne in Jerusalem's walled Old City since it was gifted by the Ottomans to French Emperor Napoleon III in 1856. France views it as a provocation when Israeli police enter the church's sandstone complex, in a...
Tags: News, France, Israel, Jerusalem, Middle East, Emmanuel Macron, Old City, Macron, Napoleon III, Church of St Anne


In Chirac's shadow, Macron steps into Jerusalem's symbolism

Emmanuel Macron begins a visit to Jerusalem on Wednesday with a symbolic stop at one of France's territories in the Holy Land aiming to avoid controversies of past presidents, while underscoring Paris' historical influence in the region. The two-day visit, which includes political meetings to discuss Iran tensions and the peace process with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, head of opposition Benny Gantz and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas, culminates in commemorations ma...
Tags: News, France, Jerusalem, Iran, Paris, Benjamin Netanyahu, Mahmoud Abbas, Auschwitz, Emmanuel Macron, Old City, Palestinian Authority, Ottomans, Napoleon III, Chirac, Benny Gantz, East Jerusalem Macron


The 10 Best Non-Hollywood Animated Movies of the Decade

(This article is part of our Best of the Decade series.) It’s not that there’s inherently anything wrong with films like the CGI animated remake of The Lion King or the third How to Train Your Dragon movie, but they have oversaturated our big screens purely by virtue of their budgets, parent companies, and the mass-market gamesmanship that fuels them. But audiences crave variety—and I’d argue that we need it to make sense of this world. To that end, the films below are some of my f...
Tags: Amazon, Japan, Hollywood, Movies, Features, Afghanistan, Netflix, Taliban, Tokyo, Nick Offerman, Miyazaki, Hayao Miyazaki, Darwin, Napoleon III, Don Hertzfeldt, Makoto Shinkai


Notre Dame Fire Reveals Gap in Safety Regulations for Toxic Lead-Dust

(PARIS) — It took a blaze that nearly destroyed Paris’ most famous cathedral to reveal a gap in global safety regulations for lead, a toxic building material found across many historic cities. After the Notre Dame fire in April spewed dozens of tons of toxic lead-dust into the atmosphere in just a few hours, Paris authorities discovered a problem with the city’s public safety regulations: There was no threshold for them to gauge how dangerous the potentially-deadly pollution was from the du...
Tags: New York, London, News, France, Uncategorized, Ap, Rome, Unesco, Britain, Paris, Moscow, World Health Organization, Associated Press, Madrid, Environmental Protection Agency, Notre Dame


Best things about Biarritz, France

France usually conjures up images of fashion, iconic architecture, and cuisine. But in the southwest corner of the country, near the border with Spain, the coastal town of Biarritz is home to something else: a thriving surf scene. Just like the French Riviera, Biarritz offers glitz and glam — but its vibe is a unique contrast between French luxury and a relaxed beach culture. Situated in the Basque country, with its own rich traditions, as well as unique architecture, rituals, and recipes, Bi...
Tags: Travel, Europe, California, France, Spain, Paris, Surfing, Michelin, Easyjet, Chanel, Biarritz, All, Atlantic Ocean, Windsor, Bayonne, Radisson Blu Hotel


Place de la Bastille – Revolutions

The Place de la Bastille is of course quite directly linked to the 1789 Revolution - the destruction of the 14th century fortress, used as a prison, which was stormed on July the 14th, 1789. I have written on the Place and the fortress several times, e.g. here and here. The Place is now under reconstruction, meaning that cars and buses will have to take new paths and that pedestrians will be more welcome. The work is  not finished, but you can already now reach the “July Column” on f...
Tags: Travel, Europe, France, Paris, Army, Napoleon, Versailles, Prussia, Eugène Delacroix, Louis XVI, Napoleon III, Louis Philippe, Honoré Daumier, Paris 11, Paris 4, Paris 12


MIT Researchers 3D Print a Bridge Imagined by Leonardo da Vinci in 1502— and Prove That It Actually Works

Photo by Gretchen Ertl, via MIT News Unfortunate though it may be for the dreamers of the world, we're all judged not by what we imagine, but what we actually do. This goes double for those specifically tasked with creating things in the physical environment, from engineers and architects to inventors and artists. Leonardo da Vinci, the original "Renaissance man," was an engineer, architect, inventor, artist, and more besides, and five centuries after his death we continue to admire him for not...
Tags: Google, Technology, College, Turkey, History, Mit, Rome, RFP, Seoul, Istanbul, Facebook Twitter, Leonardo, Chandler, Leonardo da Vinci, Galata Bridge, Napoleon III


Paris, destroyed: A map of buildings lost to history

Following the blaze that ripped through Notre Dame, it feels like Paris had lost a major link to its past.But the cathedral is lucky to have survived this far: It was almost torched by revolutionaries in 1871.As the world's first communist revolt was crushed, other Parisian landmarks were set ablaze – many of which were lost forever.The burning of Notre Dame on April 15th felt like a singular disaster. But Paris has lost countless other monuments before. This map charts one of the darkest episo...
Tags: Europe, Greece, France, Rome, Paris, Innovation, Shanghai, Army, Switzerland, Moscow, Violence, Map, Road, Notre Dame, Bordeaux, Montmartre


The United States Constitution is Not Dysfunctional

For the symposium on Sanford Levinson and Jack M. Balkin, Democracy and Dysfunction (University of Chicago Press, 2019).Steven G. Calabresi May 12, 2019 Providence, Rhode Island Dear Jack and Sandy: Thank you enormously for inviting me to comment on your new book.  While I believe the U.S. constitutional system is badly in need of some reforms, I think the U.S. Constitution, as amended, is the best such document in any of the G-20 constitutional democracies today, and I think you bo...
Tags: South Korea, Hong Kong, Europe, Japan, Tibet, Supreme Court, Putin, Obama, Congress, Indonesia, Australia, Montana, North Korea, Mexico, France, Scotland


Cinco de Mayo celebration US origins

Sometime in late May or early April of 1862, the May 27 edition of the San Francisco newspaper La Voz de Mejico reached Tuolumne Country in northern California. It had traveled by steamboat to Stockton, then by stagecoach to Sonora and the rest of the county. One of the top stories was about a battle the Mexican army won against the better-equipped French in Puebla, Mexico. The headline read, “Long live Mexico!!! Long live independence! Long live the valiant Mexican soldiers! Long live the he...
Tags: Travel, California, Mexico, US, America, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Long, Chicago, Mexico City, Stockton, Sonora, Zaragoza, Columbia, Puebla, Veracruz


Airbnb’s latest wild contest: drink, dance, and sleep at the Louvre

The Mona Lisa in the living room, right in front of the bar cart. The Venus de Milo smiling slyly during dinner. A little dance in the roccoco salon of Napoleon III right before bed. You can win a night at the Louvre in Airbnb's latest contest. The post Airbnb’s latest wild contest: drink, dance, and sleep at the Louvre appeared first on Digital Trends.
Tags: News, Trends, Paris, Airbnb, Smart Home, Contest, Louvre, Venus de Milo, Napoleon III


Airbnb contest to stay at Louvre

Hiding away in a museum after dark and having it all to yourself is the private fantasy of many art lovers, which may soon become a reality for two lucky people. In partnership with the Louvre, Airbnb is giving one winner (and a guest) the chance to spend a night at the famous Parisian museum. When the Louvre closes on the night of April 30, the winning pair will be able to sleep under the museum’s iconic glass pyramid, inside a mini pyramid designed specifically to celebrate the structure’s ...
Tags: Travel, Paris, Airbnb, Louvre, All, Venus de Milo, Napoleon III, Paris Airbnb, Louvre Airbnb


Saint-Augustin Church

A post about another church… Well, there are some 250 churches / religious buildings in Paris – with a domination of the Roman Catholic ones – some 140 … and so far this blog has only posts about some 50 (and my previous blog less than 10), so there is more to do. The Saint-Augustin Church was built during the 1860’s in an area, then completely newly shaped by Haussmannian boulevards … One considered that there was a need for another prestigious church building. During the constru...
Tags: Travel, England, Paris, Joan, Les Halles, Ballard, Napoleon III, Paris 8, PeterParis, Saint Augustin Church, Victor Ballard


Saint-Germain-en-Laye Castle

The present « Château de Saint-Germain-en-Laye » is mostly of a some-kind-of-16th-century-“renaissance” architecture (Francis I’s reign), replacing some previous buildings. But one little part was left - the chapel, from 1238, which slightly preceded and for a while held the relics for which the Sainte-Chapelle (see previous post) was built.   This has always been a Royal Castle. Louis XIV was born and spent a large part of his life here, before moving to Versailles  (see here) in 1...
Tags: Travel, England, Paris, Francis, Versailles, Saint Germain, National Archaeological Museum, German Army, Napoleon III, Laye, Sainte Chapelle, James II, National Museum of Antiquities, Emmanuel Fremiet, PeterParis, Saint-Germain-en-Laye


Death of Count of Paris sparks pretend game of thrones in France

Jean d’Orléans, descendant of Louis XIV’s brother, inherits a place in a theoretical tussle The pretender to be French king is dead. Long live the other pretenders, all three.France might have thought it had done with monarchs, first in 1793 when it sent Louis XVI to the guillotine during the French Revolution, and again when it exiled Napoleon III in 1870. Continue reading...
Tags: Europe, France, World news, Paris, Louis XIV, Louis XVI, Napoleon III


The Roman Aqueduct Of Pont Du Gard In France

In the southeast regions of France, there remains an architectural treasure from the ancient world. It is the Roman Aqueduct of Pont Du Gard. The structure built possibly around 19 BCE, is a testament to the builders, who created an engineering marvel, that survives to this day. The construction made out of limestone is both beautiful and practical in function, carrying both water and people across the Gardon River. The Pont du Gard aqueduct was added to UNESCO’s list of historically sig...
Tags: Travel, France, Rome, Unesco, United States, Duke, World Heritage Sites, Rohan, Roman Empire, BCE, Pont du Gard, Louvre Paris, Gard, Nimes, Napoleon III, Claudius


Pristine Footage Lets You Revisit Life in Paris in the 1890s: Watch Footage Shot by the Lumière Brothers

Pioneering filmmakers Auguste and Louis Lumière, the inventors of the projected motion picture, held their first private screening in Paris in March of 1895. The streets of the French capital would go on to provide the brothers with plenty of life in motion for their new technology to capture in the years thereafter, and you can watch eight such real scenes compiled in the video above. With its startling clarity — and its more recently corrected motion and added sound — this selection of...
Tags: Google, London, Film, College, Berlin, New York City, San Francisco, History, Paris, Tokyo, Eiffel Tower, Seoul, Coen Brothers, Facebook Twitter, Eric Rohmer, Paris Metro


Saint-Augustin Church

A post about another church… Well, there are some 250 churches / religious buildings in Paris – with a domination of the Roman Catholic ones – some 140 … and so far this blog has only posts about some 50 (and my previous blog less than 10), so there is more to do. The Saint-Augustin Church was built during the 1860’s in a then by Haussmannian boulevards completely newly shaped area… One considered that there was a need for another prestigious church building. During the constructi...
Tags: Travel, England, Paris, Joan, Les Halles, Ballard, Napoleon III, Paris 8, PeterParis, Saint Augustin Church, Victor Ballard


Saint-Germain-en-Laye Castle

The present « Château de Saint-Germain-en-Laye » is mostly of a some-kind-of-16th-century-“renaissance” architecture (Francis I’s reign), replacing some previous buildings. But one little part was left - the chapel, from 1238, which slightly preceded and for a while held the relics for which the Sainte-Chapelle (see previous post) was built.   This has always been a Royal Castle. Louis XIV was born and spent a large part of his life here, before moving to Versailles  (see here) in 1...
Tags: Travel, England, Paris, Francis, Versailles, Saint Germain, National Archaeological Museum, German Army, Napoleon III, Laye, Sainte Chapelle, James II, National Museum of Antiquities, Emmanuel Fremiet, PeterParis, Saint-Germain-en-Laye


Home at the Office: Designer Marianne Evennou’s Paris Work Quarters and Pied-à-Terre

French interior designer Marianne Evennou is known as a colorist: “Colors for me are like musical notes—they’re all good; you just have to adjust them to make a nice melody.” She also has a thing for interior windows: “As I always say, the eye needs to be able to escape.” For years, Evennou worked out of the vast loft she shares with her sculptor/furniture maker husband, Franck Evennou, in the cobblestoned town of Senlis, 45 kilometers north of Paris. More recently, she decided to open an office...
Tags: Books, UK, Paris, Offices, Lyon, Signal, Villeroy Boch, Napoleon III, Home Offices, Architecture & Interiors, Marianne Evennou, Little Greene, Senlis, Franck Evennou, Olivier Abry, Zangra


Alexis de Tocqueville, socialism, and the American Way

Alexis de Tocqueville, socialism, and the American Way Alexis de Tocqueville (1805-1859) is perhaps best known among Americans as the author of the influential work, Democracy in America. He produced the book in two volumes -- the first, which came out in 1835 and the second, which came out in 1840 -- after taking a tour of the United States with his colleague and friend Gustave de Beaumont in 1831-32. His thesis in Democracy was simple. After careful obser...
Tags: England, France, Religion, America, United States, Paris, Napoleon, Assembly, Jefferson, Locke, Cherbourg, Chamber of Deputies, John Locke, Alexis de Tocqueville, Napoleon III, Louis Philippe