Posts filtered by tags: National Bureau of Economic Research[x]


 

Higher Education in America

 Higher Education in America U.S.A. –-(Ammoland.com)- Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Economics at Ohio University Richard Vedder's new book, “Restoring the Promise,” published by the Independent Institute based in Oakland, California, is about the crisis in higher education. He summarizes the three major problems faced by America's colleges and universities. First, our universities “are vastly too expensive, often costing twice as much per student compared with institutions in other indu...
Tags: Guns, America, South Africa, National Bureau of Economic Research, Oakland California, Independent Institute, Ohio University, Richard Arum, Josipa Roksa, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, NAEP, Vedder, Gun Rights News, Walter E. Williams, George Mason University Williams, State Against Blacks


A closer read of the “gender wage gap” tells a different story

Women can’t seem to get a break. They not only have to pay more than men for things like life insurance and haircuts, they earn less, too. It seems so unfair.  But is it? Women pay more for life insurance because of an actuarial fact: they live longer than men. Is there perhaps an equally reasonable explanation for the fact that, compared to men, women make only 80 cents on the dollar? Why, yes, there is.  The 20-cent “wage gap” compares the earnings of all men who work at least 35 hours per wee...
Tags: Opinion, Sport, Soccer, House Of Representatives, Denmark, Kate, National Bureau of Economic Research, Southern California, Kingsley Tufts, Payscale, Guest Commentary, Rachel Greszler


What Happens When We Seek Status Instead of Goodness?

This month, more than a dozen wealthy parents will appear in a Boston federal court, accused of using a criminal “side door” to get their kids into prestigious schools. Among those on the U.S. attorney’s star-studded list of indictments are Lori Loughlin, who played Aunt Becky in Fuller House, and Felicity Huffman, a Desperate Housewives regular. These parents bribed coaches with hundreds of thousands of dollars, took fake recruiting photos, and had their kids cheat on tests, all to score admiss...
Tags: Instagram, Parenting, Boston, Harvard, National Bureau of Economic Research, Delaware, Usc, Stanford University, Fuller House, Alain De Botton, Dale, Huffman, Becky, Robb Willer, Willer, University of Amsterdam


The downside of paid family leave: Denmark

The downside of paid family leave: Denmark As Republicans unveil plans for compulsory paid family leave, they would be well instructed to see how such policies have hurt women’s employment prospects. In Europe, where paid leave is often compulsory, women face fewer prospects for advancement than in the United States. Veronique de Rugy, a senior fellow at the Mercatus Center at George Mason University, writes about the example of Denmark in The American Spe...
Tags: Europe, London, Sweden, Religion, United States, Denmark, National Bureau of Economic Research, Ben, George Mason University, John Chrysostom, Mercatus Center, Veronique De Rugy, St Chrysostom, Spectator De Rugy, Henrik Kleven Camille Landais, Jakob Egholt Sogaard


Students are slowly being liberated from teacher unions

The nation’s largest teachers’ union, the National Education Association (NEA), is reeling right now. Six months ago, the Supreme Court ruled that government workers, including public school teachers, can’t be forced to pay union fees in the case Janus v. AFCSME. Since then, the organization has lost 17,000 members. Labor economists predict teachers unions could lose up to a third of their total membership in the coming years. But this won’t be a blow to public schools, as it’s often projected t...
Tags: Supreme Court, California, Opinion, Sport, Soccer, United States, Dallas, Union, Lausd, National Bureau of Economic Research, Calder, Kelly, University of Texas, Janus, Liebowitz, UT Dallas


Harvard's Cass Sunstein: Algorithms can correct human biases

Algorithms help drive the modern world.Algorithms reflect human biases, but some — as Harvard's Cass Sunstein notes — can be built to help correct our biases.If you build the right algorithm, you might be able to help contribute to a better world. None Algorithms are part of the engine that drives the modern world. When you search for something on Google, you're relying on a search engine defined by a specific algorithm. When you see what you see on your news feed on Facebook, you're not looking...
Tags: Google, Amazon, Facebook, Harvard, United States, Innovation, Machine Learning, Miami, Philadelphia, Algorithm, Ai, National Bureau of Economic Research, Pittsburgh, Cass Sunstein, Harvard Kennedy School, Sunstein


How will we know we're in a recession?

What the National Bureau of Economic Research looks for when analyzing the business cycle.
Tags: National Bureau of Economic Research


What happens when you learn how much your coworkers make?

The debate on whether to be transparent about our salaries has been going on for decades.New research shows that depending on whether we share our salaries vertically (from boss to employee) or horizontally (between equal peers), we can expect different effects in our productivity and motivation.Millennials are more likely to share salary information than previous generations. What effect will this have on the workplace? None When we talk about our work, we talk about employee satisfaction, mora...
Tags: Psychology, Work, Motivation, Asia, Money, Success, Work-life balance, Innovation, National Bureau of Economic Research, Ricardo Perez Truglia, Zoe Cullen


How is "Mega Problem Denial Syndrome" Impacting Your Career?

One of my favorite writer/thinkers, Umair Haque published a fantastic post on Friday  about what he calls "Mega Problem Denial Syndrome" or MPDS:  Let me introduce you to the biggest little problem in leadership: Mega-Problem Denial Syndrome (MPDS). As often in life, it’s the little problems that turn out to be trickier and more troubling than the big ones—like postponing having that troublesome lump scanned because you’re too busy/scared/lazy. Certain challenges may seem distant and theref...
Tags: National Bureau of Economic Research, eLearning, Michele Martin, Umair Haque


How is "Mega Problem Denial Syndrome" Impacting Your Career?

One of my favorite writer/thinkers, Umair Haque published a fantastic post on Friday  about what he calls "Mega Problem Denial Syndrome" or MPDS:  Let me introduce you to the biggest little problem in leadership: Mega-Problem Denial Syndrome (MPDS). As often in life, it’s the little problems that turn out to be trickier and more troubling than the big ones—like postponing having that troublesome lump scanned because you’re too busy/scared/lazy. Certain challenges may seem distant and therefore...
Tags: National Bureau of Economic Research, eLearning, Michele Martin, Umair Haque


Research shows that patent examiners are more likely to grant patents to companies they later work for

In their National Bureau of Economic Research working paper From Revolving Doors to Regulatory Capture? Evidence from Patent Examiners (Sci-Hub Mirror), Business School profs Haris Tabakovic (Harvard) and Thomas Wollmann (Chicago) show that patent examiners are more likely to grant patents for companies that they subequently go to work for; they also go easier on patents applied for by companies associated with their alma maters (where they have more connections and will find it easier to get ...
Tags: Post, Copyfight, News, Regulatory Capture, Economics, Chicago, Scholarship, Uspto, National Bureau of Economic Research, Barber, Incentives Matter, Powell, Revolving Door, Goulet, Haris Tabakovic, A Method And System For Corrupting Engineers


Minimum wage hikes a poor way of lifting people out of poverty

When is a mandated pay raise not a real raise? Employees in 18 states and localities (including ten in California) are about to find out as local minimum wages increased on July 1st. The purpose of this policy is to raise wages for less-advantaged employees at the bottom of the pay scale. But new research suggests an opposite effect; a higher minimum wage has done little to reduce poverty in the country’s disadvantaged neighborhoods, and might have even increased it. The disappointing performanc...
Tags: California, Opinion, Sport, Soccer, Miami, National Bureau of Economic Research, Seattle, Cornell University, Bay Area, University of California Irvine, EITC, EPI, Wetzel, Michael Saltsman, Bill Phelps, Guest Commentary


Legalizing same-sex marriage has meaningful effects on health care access for sexual-minority men

Vanderbilt researchers have documented evidence that legalizing same-sex marriage has improved access to health care for gay men in a study released as a National Bureau of Economic Research working paper this week.
Tags: Health, National Bureau of Economic Research, Vanderbilt


Apple iPhones are 'predictive of wealth', new study finds

If you own an iPhone, congratulations — you're officially wealthy.That's according to new research published recently by the National Bureau of Economic Research in the US, which worked with the University of Chicago to discover... [Author: [email protected]]
Tags: Business, US, University Of Chicago, National Bureau of Economic Research


Owning an iPhone is the Number-One Way To Guess if You're Rich or Not, Research Finds (slashdot)

An anonymous reader shares a report: In the United States, if you have an Apple iPhone or iPad, it's a strong sign that you make a lot of money. That's one of the takeaways from a new National Bureau of Economic Research working paper from University of Chicago economists Marianne Bertrand and Emir Kamenica. "Across all years in our data, no individual brand is as predictive of being high-income as owning an Apple iPhone in 2016," the researchers wrote. There are details and caveats to the resea...
Tags: News, United States, University Of Chicago, National Bureau of Economic Research, Marianne Bertrand, Msmash, Kamenica


Owning an iPhone is the Number-One Way To Guess if You're Rich or Not, Research Finds

An anonymous reader shares a report: In the United States, if you have an Apple iPhone or iPad, it's a strong sign that you make a lot of money. That's one of the takeaways from a new National Bureau of Economic Research working paper from University of Chicago economists Marianne Bertrand and Emir Kamenica. "Across all years in our data, no individual brand is as predictive of being high-income as owning an Apple iPhone in 2016," the researchers wrote. There are details and caveats to the resea...
Tags: Tech, United States, University Of Chicago, National Bureau of Economic Research, Marianne Bertrand, Kamenica


Want to Appear Rich? Buy an iPhone

It’s difficult (and generally not all that productive) to guess how wealthy someone is based on appearances. But if you really need a shorthand to figure out if someone is rich or not, a new study suggests all you need to do is see what kind of phone they own. If it’s an iPhone, odds are they’re doing well for…Read more...
Tags: Iphone, Apple, Science, Wealth, National Bureau of Economic Research, Rich, Consumer Tech


Researchers find that owning an iPhone or iPad is the number-one way to guess if you’re rich or not (AAPL)

A new paper from University of Chicago economists attempts to infer demographics based on people's consumer behavior or media consumption. The researchers found that "no individual brand is as predictive of being high-income as owning an Apple iPhone" based on 2016 data.  In the United States, if you have an Apple iPhone or iPad, it's a strong sign that you make a lot of money. That's one of the takeaways from a new National Bureau of Economic Research working paper from University of Chicag...
Tags: Apple, Verizon, Facebook, Time, US, Trends, United States, University Of Chicago, National Bureau of Economic Research, Aapl, Trump, NBER, Kikkoman, Marianne Bertrand, Kamenica, Mediamark Research Intelligence


Rent control isn’t the answer to our housing crisis

In response to rising housing costs, activists across Southern California have pushed for rent control. Efforts have been made this year in cities like Inglewood, Long Beach, Pasadena and Pomona to put rent control measures on the ballot. After all, what could a more straightforward way of dealing with rising housing costs than having the government pass laws to limit rising housing costs? The simplicity is the appeal of rent control. It sounds like the solution people who are struggling to affo...
Tags: California, Opinion, Sport, Soccer, Editorials, National Bureau of Economic Research, Southern California, Pomona, CEQA, San Francisco While, Beacon Economics, Inglewood Long Beach Pasadena


Strategies: Thinking About Retirement? Consider Working a Little Longer

Because of Social Security, delaying retirement will produce extra monthly income that most people can’t match with investment, savings and cost-cutting alone.
Tags: News, Retirement, Social Security, Income, National Bureau of Economic Research, Longevity, John B, Pensions and Retirement Plans, High Net Worth Individuals, Social Security (US, Shoven


How My Smartphone Ruined my Travel Experience

People take photos of a van Gogh painting at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. Sarah Eddy photos. Not using my iPhone abroad improved the way I travel and reconnected me with the real world By Sarah Eddy Going around without a working cell phone can make you feel like the only lucid person in a world of zombies. On an underground train, where I first found myself phoneless, everyone is either absorbed in a screen or talking to a friend. A phone booth in London. It was mi...
Tags: Travel, Iphone, Europe, London, New York City, National Bureau of Economic Research, Tower Bridge, Reflections, River Thames, East End, Metropolitan Museum Of Art, Gogh, Leaning Tower of Pisa, Sarah Eddy, Sarah Eddy Going, Becca Eddy


Parenting Pointers: Age Discrimination and #MeToo in the Workplace

In a study from the National Bureau of Economic Research, the authors suggest two possible reasons why older female job seekers face more age discrimination than males. While age discrimination is illegal, in practice it's difficult to prove.Brought to you by: Frugal Focus
Tags: National Bureau of Economic Research, Frugality


New research shows successful founders are far older than the Valley stereotype

There is a classic stereotype of the Silicon Valley entrepreneur: often a computer science nerd, almost certainly male, ambitious, and most importantly, young — very young. Founders who have been covered extensively by the media, like Bill Gates, Steve Jobs, and Mark Zuckerberg, started their companies still glimpsing their teenage years, and that reputation has spread widely across the industry. Now, a group of economics researchers have conduced a comprehensive investigation of the starting ag...
Tags: Startups, Mark Zuckerberg, New York, Tech, Venture Capital, Silicon Valley, National Bureau of Economic Research, Javier Miranda, Pierre Azoulay Benjamin Jones J Daniel Kim


Law Professors Are Paid Less, Work As Hard As Lawyers Do

Inside Higher Ed, ‘Poorly Paid’ Professors: Professors earn about 15 percent less than others with advanced degrees, finds a study circulated Tuesday by the National Bureau of Economic Research. The study, Why Are Professors 'Poorly Paid'?, uses data from the Current Population Survey to compare the salaries and other characteristics... [Author: Paul Caron]
Tags: Taxes, National Bureau of Economic Research, Paul Caron, Legal Education


Supra-Heated Economy – Reference Mark

Economists and stock pickers have their supercomputers humming to try to determine when the next recession and market swoon will happen. I don’t need all that fancy software. Nor do I need to analyze reams of political or trade-trend white papers. My quarter-mile-long measuring stick for economic calamity: Japanese sports cars. That’s because the past three recessions can all be connected to when Japan’s automakers launched a new generation of hair-pinning acceleration monsters. I’m not sure ...
Tags: Japan, Opinion, America, Tokyo, Toyota, Honda, National Bureau of Economic Research, Nissan, Mitsubishi, Mazda, Caesar, Jim Lentz, Amati, Lexus LFA, NBER, Mark Rechtin


Food deserts not to blame for growing nutrition gap between rich and poor, study finds

For decades, the conventional wisdom has been that people living in food deserts—defined as areas lacking in supermarkets with fresh produce and other nutritious items—have little choice but to buy unhealthy food at drugstores or convenience stores. But the data tell a different story. A new Chicago Booth study finds that food deserts have no meaningful effect on eating habits. Exposing low-income households to the same products and prices as those in high-income households reduces nutritional ...
Tags: Britain, United Kingdom, National Bureau of Economic Research, Stanford University, New York University, Chicago Booth, Dube, Rebecca Diamond, Jean Pierre Dubé, Sigmund E Edelstone, Hung Allcott, Allcott Diamond, Kilts Center for Marketing


Why workplace wellness programs don’t work

A study from the National Bureau of Economic Research reports on the results of a large randomized controlled trial of a large employer with over 12,000 employees. Program eligibility and financial incentives were randomized at the individual level. Over 56 percent of eligible treatment group employees participated. The study found that in the first year, the employees who signed up were healthier and had lower medical costs, but, and this is very important, they concluded we do not find signifi...
Tags: Health, National Bureau of Economic Research, Primary Care, Physician, Public Health & Policy


Robert J. LaLonde, pioneering scholar, beloved colleague and mentor, 1958-2018

Robert J. LaLonde, AB’80, was a passionate scholar whose pioneering methods continue to impact public policy and economics. But colleagues will remember the professor at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy as a beloved friend and mentor whose dedication and enthusiasm inspired faculty, students and alumni. LaLonde, who died Jan. 17 at age 59 following a long illness, was a leading scholar in the fields of labor economics, econometrics and program evaluation, and made import...
Tags: Chicago, United States, University Of Chicago, Little League, Bob, National Bureau of Economic Research, Illinois, Hyde Park, HARRIS, Luke, South Side, Kathryn, Council of Economic Advisers, Marc, LALONDE, Booth School of Business


The magical thinking that is rent control

With millions of Californians struggling under the burden of rising housing costs, it is no wonder that many are calling for rent control as one means of easing the burden on renters. According to figures cited by the California Department of Housing and Community Development, more than half all renter households in the state pay more than 30 percent of their household incomes on housing. Nearly a third pay more than half of their incomes on housing. As one would expect, low-income Californians ...
Tags: Opinion, Sacramento, San Francisco, Sport, Soccer, Editorials, National Bureau of Economic Research, Arcadia, Trump, USCIS, Assembly, Healdsburg, Irvine, Jim Wood, Michael Weinstein, RANCHO CUCAMONGA


Faculty members receive named, distinguished service professorships

Seventeen faculty members received named professorships or were appointed distinguished service professors. Michael Foote, Sydney Hans, Heinrich Jaeger and Carole Ober received distinguished service professorships; Daniel Arber, Christopher Berry, Mark Courtney, Fred M. Donner, Steven Durlauf, Dwight N. Hopkins, Bana Jabri, John D. Kelly, Howard Nusbaum, Louis H. Philipson, James T. Robinson, Stuart Rowan and Chad Syverson received named professorships. Biological Sciences Division ...