Posts filtered by tags: Neurochemistry[x]


 

Antidepressants in Our Water Make Crayfish Go Buck Wild

If you’ve ever taken an SSRI that makes you want to go out and start living life again, you may be able to relate to crayfish. A study published Wednesday in Ecosphere inspects the effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or SSRIs, on crayfish, finding that the medication that helps people with depression…Read more...
Tags: Science, Drugs, Environment, Serotonin, Antidepressants, Reisinger, SSRI, Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors, Crayfish, Fluoxetine, Neurochemistry, Psychoactive Drugs, Sertraline, Aj Reisinger


A Little Laughing Gas Can Help Treat Depression, Small Study Finds

A dose of laughing gas may just help some people with hard-to-treat depression, suggests a new, small clinical trial published Wednesday. The study found that people who inhaled nitrous oxide reported improvements in their depression symptoms afterward. It also found that people felt similar improvements with a…Read more...
Tags: Science, Drugs, Ketamine, Nitrous Oxide, Johnson Johnson, Treatment Resistant Depression, Neurochemistry, Euphoriants, Health Medical Pharma, Psychoactive Drugs, Management Of Depression, Nmda Receptor Antagonists, General Anesthetics, Dissociative Drugs, Nicotinic Antagonists, Nagale


More Than Chemicals: The Difference Between Pleasure and Happiness

The experience of pleasure is distinct from the experience of happiness. Quite distinct. With pleasure, a dopamine “spike” occurs in response to an acute momentary reward. The experience feels wonderful but depletes serotonin. The ultimate consequence of repeated rushes to this pleasure center leads to the loss of dopamine receptors in the brain. With the loss of neurons comes Tolerance: a situation in which more and more “hits” are needed to feel the same impact as before — or to feel anythi...
Tags: Psychology, Facebook, Books, Cook, Happiness, San Francisco, United States, University Of California, Pleasure, Omega, Joy, Lustig, Robert Lustig, Neurotransmitter, Neurochemistry