Posts filtered by tags: Orson-Welles[x]


 

The 100 best drama movies of all time, according to critics

"The Godfather Part 2"Paramount Pictures We ranked the 100 best dramas of all time based on Rotten Tomatoes' adjusted score. The adjusted score is based on a weighted formula that gives newer movies an advantage. The list includes classics like "Citizen Kane," recent Oscar winners like "Parasite," and blockbusters like "Black Panther." Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. As a cinematic genre, "drama" has taken many forms over the decades.The list we compiled here is ba...
Tags: Florida, UK, New York, Hollywood, London, Viola Davis, Movies, Media, Drama, Entertainment, Iraq, Orson Welles, America, San Francisco, Trends, Cnn


Overlooked Holiday Movies That Are Surprisingly Somber

Most winter holiday viewing is drawn from relatively narrow lists of familiar favorites, to the point that even several of our supposedly "alternative" or "contrarian" choices have become well-worn selections. Only particularly crotchety curmudgeons continue to argue against acknowledging "Die Hard" or "Gremlins" as Christmas films anymore, and it's no secret by now how many of Shane Black's scripts are set during Christmas.But there remain obscure oddballs of holiday movies, often available exc...
Tags: Hbo, New York, London, Movies, Abc, Superman, Disney, Orson Welles, Los Angeles, Reagan, Bbc, Marlo Thomas, Mtv, Wes Anderson, Bill Murray, Kevin Bacon


15 '80s Thrillers You Definitely Need To See

In his conversations with Francois Truffaut, Alfred Hitchcock defined suspense as a bomb under a table that only the audience sees, with a timer that only the audience knows about. "In these conditions this same innocuous conversation becomes fascinating because the public is participating in the scene," he said. "The audience is longing to warn the characters on the screen." That participation, a suspense by helpless omniscience, is what makes thrillers thrill. The 1980s were a banner age for k...
Tags: Movies, Colorado, Washington, Berlin, Superman, Orson Welles, Reagan, Fbi, Chicago, Walter Matthau, Nicole Kidman, Oliver Stone, Tommy Lee Jones, Cia, Beatty, Quinn


Movies Like Nightcrawler That Are Definitely Worth Watching

Dan Gilroy's "Nightcrawler" dropped in 2014, a year in which Americans by and large trusted the media. That statement feels false, and yet not only did the 2021 Edelman Trust Barometer find that fewer than half of U.S. residents trust mainstream news sources, but that this is actually the first time that has happened in the nation's recent history. It's easy to see why. The country has moved past "fake news" and into "post-truth," with people turning to sources that support their inherent belief...
Tags: New York, Hollywood, Movies, Robert Downey Jr, Congress, California, Orson Welles, Cnn, Netflix, United States, Jake Gyllenhaal, Oliver Stone, Nightcrawler, Brian, Leo, Dustin Hoffman


Word of the week: Oneiric

During the first year of the Covid pandemic, some people took up sourdough baking, others began studying a new language or learning to play an instrument. My preferred pastime was, and remains, film noir. Over the last eighteen months I’ve watched more than 100 noirs, many of them more than once, from The Maltese Falcon (1941) to Kiss Me Deadly (1955). Orson Welles’s Touch of Evil, from 1958, is often considered the last true film noir; I saw it once in a theater, years ago, and plan to see it ...
Tags: Books, Film, Scotland, Orson Welles, Linguistics, Greek, Humphrey Bogart, Tcm, Matthew Sweet, Merriam Webster, Müller, Oxford University Press, Claire Trevor, Word of The Week, Nancy Friedman, FNF


Citizen Kane Ending Explained

While Orson Welles' Academy Award-winning film is, as of this writing, 80 years old, there may be a small contingent of /Film readers who have not seen "Citizen Kane" and may not yet know about its famous ending. So consider these opening sentences a Spoiler Warning for one of the highest-regarded and famous movies of all time. For many decades, "Citizen Kane" was practically a punchline in how widely acclaimed it was. Scholars have expounded deeply into its meaning, politics, technique, groundb...
Tags: Hollywood, Movies, Orson Welles, America, Gary Oldman, Alfred Hitchcock, David Fincher, Kane, Hearst, Charlie, Davies, Welles, Rosebud, Amanda Seyfried, Marion Davies, Agnes Moorehead


"People will think..." "What I tell them to think!": 5 notes on the ever eerily relevant Citizen Kane (1941)

1) Given its "classic" status, it is easy to forget that Orson Welles' Citizen Kane (1941) was made in a spirit of savage mockery of yellow journalism newspaper magnate William Randolph Hearst, a man whose media empire allowed him to guide mass public opinion as he pleased, even to the point of trying his durndest to destroy Citizen Kane. Who could we compare Kane to nowadays? A man who builds his career around lies? A man who, when he loses an election, turns to the headline "Fraud at polls!"...
Tags: Movies, Orson Welles, New York Times, Charles, Kane, Emily, Herman, Welles, Fox News Network, Charles Foster Kane, Citizen Kane, William Randolph Hearst, Susan Alexander, Orson, RKO Radio Pictures, The Film Doctor


Kaylee Dugan's Favorite Movies Of All Time

Hello /Film friends! I don't know what made you click on this article but I'm simultaneously glad you did and I'm also terrified you'll find a way to bully me online. This might sound ridiculous, but even though I've been writing about movies (and food, art, music and all other sorts of cultural joys) for almost a decade, I still have to imagine the internet as a black void where no one can actually read my content. What can I say, I'm fun to have at parties.Even though the internet is listicles...
Tags: England, Movies, Maryland, Jack Nicholson, La, Orson Welles, Rochester, Marissa, Cher, Jim Jarmusch, Anna Wintour, Detroit, Miyazaki, Hayao Miyazaki, Tom Hiddleston, Nicolas Cage


Dean Stockwell, Quantum Leap and Blue Velvet actor, dies aged 85

Versatile actor had worked in Hollywood since childhood, and was Oscar nominated for his role in 1988 comedy Married to the MobDean Stockwell, the former child star who became a key figure in the Hollywood counter-culture and enjoyed late success in popular TV shows, has died aged 85. According to Deadline, his family said he died at home “of natural causes”.Born in Los Angeles in 1936, Stockwell had become a major name while still in high school, starring in the anti-racism parable The Boy With...
Tags: Hollywood, Texas, Television, Film, Orson Welles, Los Angeles, World news, US news, Culture, Awards and prizes, Television & radio, Paris, US television, Oscar, Battlestar Galactica, Errol Flynn


Word of the week: Oneiric

During the first year of the Covid pandemic, some people took up sourdough baking, others began studying a new language or learning to play an instrument. My preferred pastime was, and remains, film noir. Over the last eighteen months I’ve watched more than 100 noirs, many of them more than once, from The Maltese Falcon (1941) to Kiss Me Deadly (1955). Orson Welles’s Touch of Evil, from 1958, is often considered the last true film noir; I saw it once in a theater, years ago, and plan to see it ...
Tags: Books, Film, Scotland, Orson Welles, Linguistics, Greek, Humphrey Bogart, Tcm, Matthew Sweet, Merriam Webster, Müller, Oxford University Press, Claire Trevor, Word of The Week, Nancy Friedman, FNF


Every Mel Brooks Movie Ranked From Worst To Best

The laugh that turned Melvin Kaminsky into Mel Brooks was, as the filmmaker would later tell Conan O'Brien, "a giant mistake." At age 14, the stagehand and de facto understudy found himself hastily recruited to play a 70-something district attorney. In the middle of his terrified performance, Kaminsky dropped a glass of water. It shattered. His scene partner froze. The audience gasped. It was Brooks who finally walked upstage, tore his fake beard off, and pleaded, "I've never done this before!"T...
Tags: Hollywood, Movies, Molly, Cbs News, Nazis, Russia, Robin Hood, Orson Welles, Star, Fox, Alan Johnson, New York Times, Monty Python, Npr, Nielsen, Hitler


All The Films Of Don Coscarelli Ranked Worst To Best

The Halloween season sees many horror film fans exhuming familiar favorites — from Tod Browning's "Dracula" and James Whale's "Frankenstein," to John Carpenter's "Halloween" and Wes Craven's "A Nightmare on Elm Street" — but one filmmaker who always deserves more recognition, especially as the daylight hours grow shorter, is Don Coscarelli.Coscarelli's resume can be a bit hit-or-miss, but no more so than many of his more celebrated peers, and when he's at his best, regardless of which genre he h...
Tags: Hbo, Movies, California, Orson Welles, Dermot Mulroney, Showtime, Ikea, John, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Ellen, TNT, Ridley Scott, James Cameron, Chernobyl, Peter Jackson, Elvis


32 Days of Halloween XIV: Day #21

Orson Welles in Suspense,Easter 2016, & ANTS! First things first for today: we’re back to the old-time radio show Suspense, with an episode starring Orson Welles from 1944. It’s “The Dark Tower.” No, not that one. Next, we go to an interesting one: this is from Play for Tomorrow, from 1982. It was a six-part sci-fi anthology series from across the pond. Students in a college in Northern Ireland decide to commemorate the centenary of the Easter of 1916. Look out for Bill Nighy,...
Tags: Halloween, Television, Movies, Horror, 32 Days of Halloween, Sci-fi, Orson Welles, Northern Ireland, Kenneth Branagh, Bernie Casey, Brian Dennehy, Myrna Loy, Nora Charles, Gerald Gordon, When Animals Attack, Robert Foxworth


13 Movies Like Shutter Island That You Really Need To See

Martin Scorsese's 2010 film "Shutter Island" was an exciting departure from the style that he's best known for. While he's made many different types of movies, Scorsese is best known for his crime dramas -- films like "Taxi Driver," "Raging Bull," "Goodfellas," and "Casino" are all considered classics.However, a psychological horror film with shocking plot twists was new territory for the beloved director. Scorsese had dabbled in horror themes with "Bringing Out the Dead" and "Cape Fear," but "S...
Tags: Hollywood, London, Movies, Orson Welles, US, Toronto, Los Angeles, West Virginia, Chicago, Pennsylvania, United States, Connecticut, David Cronenberg, Leonardo Dicaprio, Roy, Christian Bale


The Legendary Francis Ford Coppola Revisits Dementia 13, His Low-Budget Horror Debut [Interview]

Legendary filmmaker Francis Ford Coppola was around 21-years old when he made his feature directorial debut with "Dementia 13." And decades later, he has revisited the Roger Corman-produced film to release a remastered director's cut of his playfully dark horror movie. Upon initial release, scenes were added and cut not to the filmmaker's liking. Now, Coppola's original vision is both restored and enjoyable. When the director started shooting his first feature film, he didn't have a script. He'd...
Tags: Movies, News, China, Stephen King, Orson Welles, Ireland, Tennessee, Kubrick, Kraft, Usc, Roger Corman, Ucla, Proust, Francis Ford Coppola, Yugoslavia, Welles


10 cool things you’ll see at the Academy Museum of Motion Pictures

Since 1927, the Academy of Motion Pictures and Arts has been collecting film related items that span film history. And now, about 1,200 of these items, as well as others recently acquired or on loan, have found a home at the new Academy Museum of Motion Pictures in Los Angeles. The seven-story, 300,000-square-foot museum, located on Miracle Mile, aims to explore the history, art, science, artists and social impact of movie making “We are telling multifaceted stories here, not just one kind of hi...
Tags: Hollywood, Movies, Orson Welles, Los Angeles, Sport, Things To Do, Soccer, Oscar, James Bond, Spike Lee, Quentin Tarantino, North America, Ridley Scott, Dorothy, Alfred Hitchcock, Hayao Miyazaki


One Complaint Per Table

Laura Olin is right; this recorded lunch conversation with Orson Welles from 1983 is well worth a read. I mean: Waiter: Gentlemen, bon appétit. How is everything? O.W.: We’re talking, thank you. [Waiter leaves.] I wish they wouldn’t do that. If I ever own a restaurant, I will never allow the waiters to ask if the diners like their dishes. Particularly when they’re talking. H.J.: What is wrong with your food? O.W.: It’s not what I had yesterday. H.J.: You want to try to explain this to the w...
Tags: New York, Orson Welles, Algonquin, Warren Beatty, Charles Chaplin, Jason Kottke, Nathan, Royalton, Laura Olin, George Jean Nathan America, Hotel Royalton


Orson Welles' Directed Films Ranked Worst To Best

Surveying Welles' filmography as a whole, some trends emerge. It's easy to see that Welles was a fan of Shakespeare, particularly the Bard's characters who author their own undoing. Whenever Welles portrays relationships, his characters evince betrayal, hypocrisy, and deception. He returns to the turn of the 19th into the 20th century repeatedly, an unexpectedly early era for a man born in 1915.He was also remarkably prolific. Even after winnowing his filmography down to the projects he directed...
Tags: Mark Zuckerberg, New York, Hollywood, Movies, California, Orson Welles, America, San Francisco, Ireland, Shanghai, Norman Foster, Pablo Picasso, Venice, Rupert Murdoch, Shakespeare, Othello


The 10 Best Orson Welles Characters Ranked

Before he gained a reputation of being difficult to work with and decamped to Europe twice in search of more freedom as a filmmaker, Orson Welles was a former child prodigy who was initially embraced by Hollywood as a wunderkind. Welles directed himself to critical acclaim in starring screen roles as both "Macbeth" and "Othello" and sparked a Halloween-eve panic in 1938 with his radio adaptation of H.G. Wells' "The War of the Worlds." His 1941 epic "Citizen Kane" routinely tops lists of the best...
Tags: Europe, Hollywood, Movies, Supreme Court, France, Edgar Allan Poe, Orson Welles, America, Vienna, Ireland, United Kingdom, Harry, William Shakespeare, Nazi, Shakespeare, Mel Brooks


Darth Vader’s Voice: The Original Voice Versus the Vocals of James Earl Jones

The hulking black-caped figure, “a walking iron lung,” as George Lucas called him in 1977, Darth Vader more than rightly tops a list of the 50 best movie villains of all time as the “gold standard of villainy,” but it took more than inspired costuming to make him so. Vader is a composite creation of several different talents. The quality by which we most know (and fear) him – the booming voice that commands and kills from afar — came, of course, from James Earl Jones. As one of the 20th ...
Tags: Facebook, UK, Film, College, Orson Welles, Npr, James Earl Jones, Darth Vader, George Lucas, Jones, Lucas, Vader, Josh Jones, Ben Burtt, David Prowse, Prowse


David Fincher's Protagonists Ranked Worst To Best

Since 1992, David Fincher has constructed a signature style out of hefty, character-driven thrillers. Fincher's TV shows are just as heady as his films, too, with protagonists that aren't typical heroes, but flawed people. In fact, that theme even extends to his music video work, with his 1990 video for Aerosmith's "Janie's Got a Gun" foretelling the kind of director Fincher was destined to be. Thus, it's the characters who shape the core of a Fincher film; the settings are just window dressing ...
Tags: Mark Zuckerberg, Hollywood, Movies, Aaron Sorkin, Orson Welles, Netflix, New Orleans, Morgan Freeman, Brad Pitt, Stieg Larsson, Edward Norton, Sigourney Weaver, Gillian Flynn, Times, Gary Oldman, Gordon Gecko


The 15 Best Debut Films From Directors

A great first film can jumpstart a filmmaker's career and show the world what makes them unique. For example, the conversational dialogue, '70s soundtrack, and nonlinear narrative of Quentin Tarantino's first film "Reservoir Dogs" established tropes that the director still relies on today.Not every great director starts out strong, though. Although he's one of the greatest filmmakers working today, David Fincher's career nearly imploded after his disastrous debut, "Alien 3." Similarly, some dire...
Tags: Movies, Boston, Ben Affleck, Orson Welles, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Tennessee, Paris, Army, Davis, Sam Mendes, Johnson, Quentin Tarantino, Darren Aronofsky, George Romero, David Lynch


The Daily Stream: The Vast Of Night Is A Hidden Gem That Uses A Radio Drama Style To Tell UFO Stories

(Welcome to The Daily Stream, an ongoing series in which the /Film team shares what they've been watching, why it's worth checking out, and where you can stream it.)The Movie: "The Vast of Night"Where You Can Stream It: Amazon Prime VideoThe Pitch: A small-town disc jockey and a switchboard operator in '50s New Mexico receive strange calls and pick up an audio signal that might herald an alien presence in the skies overhead. It's a night when most of the town is at a high school basketball game,...
Tags: Movies, Orson Welles, New Mexico, Ray, Everett, Jill, Art Bell, Roger Deakins, WINSTON, SlashFilm, Andrew Patterson, Sierra mccormick, James Deakins, Team deakins, Everett Sloan Jake Horowitz, Fay Crocker


The 20 Greatest James Bond Villains Ever

After several release date pushes, the latest James Bond film, "No Time to Die," is set to hit theaters in October. The 25th installment in the long-running franchise comes with heightened expectations, and not just because of the delays. It marks the final appearance of Daniel Craig as 007 before a new actor slips into the role of the martini-sipping super spy.While "No Time To Die" won't end the ongoing debate about who the best Bond is and who should take up the role next, it's exciting to se...
Tags: Movies, Russia, Christopher Lee, Orson Welles, Earth, James Bond, Ian Fleming, New Orleans, Judi Dench, San Andreas, Silicon Valley, Secret Service, Christoph Waltz, Daniel Craig, Christopher Walken, Cia


The 10 Greatest John Carpenter Characters Ranked

Over the course of a filmmaking career that's spanned five decades, director John Carpenter has created some of the most memorable monsters in the history of cinema, including Michael Myers in "Halloween" in 1978 and the Thing in 1982. But Carpenter also has a knack for well-crafted characters, which makes sense when you consider that, much like Orson Welles and his Mercury Theatre company of players, Carpenter tends to draw from the same stable of actors for much of his casting.As much as Carpe...
Tags: New York, Movies, Orson Welles, Clint Eastwood, Antarctica, Bruce Wayne, Vietnam, Jack, Jeff Bridges, Alan Rickman, Jamie Lee Curtis, Gwyneth Paltrow, Captain America, Michael, Jamie, John Carpenter


‘Citizen Kane’ Ushers in Criterion’s First 4K Releases

Folks have been wondering when the Criterion Collection would make the leap to 4K, and the answer is now! Well, okay, not now now, but Criterion has just announced their first wave of 4K titles, revealing that the immortal classic Citizen Kane will be the first official 4K entry into the collection. The 4K releases will begin in November 2021, and full details are still forthcoming. For now, though, we know the Criterion 4K releases will include Citizen Kane, Menace II Society, The Piano, Mulho...
Tags: Amazon, Movies, News, Orson Welles, Los Angeles, New Zealand, Criterion, David Lynch, Kane, Blu, Allen, Jane Campion, Holly Hunter, Richard Lester, Michael Powell, Anna Paquin


Eric Vespe’s Favorite Movies of All Time

Ranking films is always, always, always a fool’s errand. The whole reason we like cinema in the first place is because we go into each and every film with our own unique baggage. Strike that, we go into each and every viewing of a film with that baggage. So, a movie you saw in your 20s might have bounced off of you, but when you watch it again a decade later you’re going in with 10 more years of life experience and it can hit you in a radically different way. A prime example of this phenomenon ...
Tags: Hollywood, Movies, Stephen King, Orson Welles, Raiders, Earth, Features, Austin, William Powell, Fox, New Zealand, Jurassic Park, Terry Gilliam, Quentin Tarantino, John Lithgow, Casablanca


Hollywood’s Best Sermon? Pulpit?

”In this same New Bedford there stands a Whaleman’s Chapel, and few are the moody fishermen, shortly bound for the Indian Ocean or Pacific, who fail to make a Sunday visit to the spot. I am sure that I did not.”—Moby Dick, Chapter 6, written by Herman Melville I don’t remember how old I was […]
Tags: Hollywood, Massachusetts, Miscellaneous, Orson Welles, Filmmaking, Quentin Tarantino, Pacific, Indian Ocean, Herman Melville, John Huston, New Bedford, Joe Rogan, Moby Dick, Seaman& 039, s Chapel


The Aesthetic of Evil: A Video Essay Explores Evil in the Films of Bergman, Hitchcock, Kubrick, Scorsese & Beyond

Movies have heroes and villains. Or at least children’s movies do; the more sophisticated the audience, the hazier the line between good and evil becomes, until it finally seems to vanish altogether. Not that cinema directed toward genuinely mature audiences dispenses with those concepts entirely: rather, it makes art out of the ambiguity and interpenetration between them. This is true, to an extent, even in some of the recent wave of big-budget superhero movies, in the main exerci...
Tags: Facebook, Christopher Nolan, Film, College, Orson Welles, Batman, Seoul, Michael Haneke, Alexander, Jamie Hector, David Simon, Benny, Marlo, Edmund Burke, Haneke, Norman Bates


The Worst of the Best: “How Green Was My Valley”

This month on “The Worst of the Best,” I’m taking a slightly different route than I usually take. 1941’s Best Picture winner How Green Was My Valley doesn’t have a bad reputation. In fact, it has a lot of defenders. But it’s seemingly fallen out of style and never gets mentioned as one of the all-time greats. And those who have know it for its infamy in how it won Best Picture over Citizen Kane. The politics of the time made this decision understandable. Kane was seen as an insult to the still ...
Tags: Music, Hollywood, Film, Orson Welles, Ford, Stanley Kubrick, Oscars, Stagecoach, John Ford, Kane, Valley, John Steinbeck, Steinbeck, Welles, Beth, Maureen