Posts filtered by tags: Philosophy[x]


 

Re-reading Camus’s The Plague in pandemic times

Sometime in the 194 0s in the sleepy c olonial city of Oran, in French occupied Algeria ,  there  was an outbreak of p lague.   First rats died, then people .  Within days, the  e n tire  city was quarantined: it  was impossible to get out, and  no one could get in . This is the fictional  setting for  Albert Camus’s  second  most famous novel,  The Plague   (1947) .  And yes,   there are some similarities  to  our current situation with the  c oronavirus .  F...
Tags: Books, Featured, France, China, US, Literature, Philosophy, Algeria, Albert Camus, Oran, Camus, Arts & Humanities, Very Short Introductions, 20th Century Philosophy, 20th Century Literature, The Plague


How G. E. M. Anscombe revolutionised 20th-century western philosophy

Gertrude Elizabeth Margaret Anscombe (b. 1919-d. 2001) was an important figure and gave significant contributions to the field of analytic philosophy, philosophy of mind, and moral and religious philosophy. Born in Limerick in March 1919 to Allen Anscombe and Gertrude Anscombe (nee Thomas), the family returned to England when her father returned from the British Army to teach as a schoolmaster. With an impressive academic career, Anscombe attended St. Hugh’s College at the University of Oxford, ...
Tags: Books, England, Featured, Oxford, British Army, Cambridge, Philosophy, University of Oxford, Cambridge University, Limerick, Nagasaki, Aristotle, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Truman, Anscombe, Thomas Aquinas


Why the presumption of good faith can make our lives civil again

The clamor of the crowd during a heated discussion can make it hard to tell who is right and who is wrong. Adam Smith wrote that the loudness of blame can stupefy our good judgment. Equally, when we're talking with just one other person, our previous assumptions and knee-jerk reactions can cloud our good judgment. If you want to find clarity in moments like that, Emily Chamlee-Wright recommends practicing the presumption of good faith. That means that we should presume, unless we have good evide...
Tags: Politics, Activism, Relationships, Friendship, Trust, Communication, Innovation, Protests, Philosophy, Emotions, Debate, Speech, Smith, University Of Michigan, Adam Smith, Washington College


Why Am I Reading Apocalyptic Novels Now?

If something frightening is happening, I want to be afraid of it. When things are bad, I want to suffer.
Tags: News, Philosophy, Emotions, Books and Literature


Don’t take life so seriously: Montaigne’s lessons on the inner life

My dad was an unhappy man. He used to complain about the slightest thing being out of place – a pen, the honeypot, his special knife with the fattened grip. By the time his health really started failing, his arthritis so bad he could no longer get out of bed, his condition became all he complained about. 'Dorian,' he said, one morning over breakfast, the grapefruit cut up indeed with his special knife, 'I hate myself.' He was 86 years old and, I felt, nearing the end of life, so I took it upon m...
Tags: Psychology, France, Happiness, US, Innovation, Philosophy, Emotions, Self, Personal Growth, Montaigne, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Ars, Bakewell, Dorian, Phillip Lopate, Sarah Bakewell


Why self-help won’t cure impostor syndrome

Do you feel as if your professional success is due to some kind of mistake? That you don’t deserve your grades, promotions, or accolades? That you’re somehow getting away with a fraud which could be uncovered at any moment?  We have a name for that cluster of anxieties: you’re suffering from impostor syndrome.At the heart of impostor syndrome is a mismatch between external measures of success – prizes or good grades, entry to a selective university or career, workplace progression – and internal...
Tags: Books, Featured, Meryl Streep, Philosophy, Maya Angelou, Sheryl Sandberg, Arts & Humanities, Nik Shuliahin, Anxietyself-help, Aristotelian Society, Aristotelian Supplementary Volume, Arisup, Imposter Syndrom, Meryl Streep Tina Fey Tom Hanks


How to Teach and Learn Philosophy During the Pandemic: A Collection of 450+ Course Videos Free Online

The term philosophy, as every introductory course first explains, means the love of wisdom. And as the oldest intellectual discipline, philosophy has proven that the love of wisdom can withstand the worst human history can throw at it. Civilizations may rise and fall, but sooner or later we always find ways to get back to philosophizing. The current coronavirus pandemic, the most frightening global event most of us have seen in our lifetimes, doesn't quite look like a civilization-ender,...
Tags: Google, Greece, College, Online Courses, Philosophy, Jackson, Albert Camus, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Steinberg, Hume, Nietzsche, Weinberg, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Liz Jackson


How to Teach and Learn Philosophy During the Pandemic: A Collection of 450+ Philosophy Videos Free Online

The term philosophy, as every introductory course first explains, means the love of wisdom. And as the oldest intellectual discipline, philosophy has proven that the love of wisdom can withstand the worst human history can throw at it. Civilizations may rise and fall, but sooner or later we always find ways to get back to philosophizing. The current coronavirus pandemic, the most frightening global event most of us have seen in our lifetimes, doesn't quite look like a civilization-ender,...
Tags: Google, Greece, College, Online Courses, Philosophy, Jackson, Albert Camus, Seoul, Facebook Twitter, Steinberg, Hume, Nietzsche, Weinberg, Colin Marshall, 21st Century Los Angeles, Liz Jackson


What Judaism Teaches Us About the Fear of Death

A conversation with the Princeton scholar Moulie Vidas on mortality and the embrace of life in Judaism.
Tags: News, Bible, Death and dying, Philosophy, Princeton, Religion and Belief, Jews and Judaism, Moulie Vidas


This 103-year-old philosopher's to-do list will get you through self-isolation

Like everybody else, Romanian philosopher Mihai Sora is stuck inside. He is keeping busy for a 103-year-old man, and keeping the world up to date on his indoor adventures with Facebook. His to-do list is impressive, but not so impressive it can't be used by most people. The social isolation necessitated by COVID-19 is difficult for a lot of people. Between being mostly stuck inside, having reduced contact with other people, and the creeping boredom that comes after you've done everything on your...
Tags: Facebook, Parenting, Youtube, France, Life, Nazis, Nasa, Virus, Nature, Innovation, Romania, Philosophy, Goal-setting, Pierre Boulez, Bob Ross, Calvert Journal


A Covenant of Life, Not Death

A conversation with the Princeton scholar Moulie Vidas on mortality and the embrace of life in Judaism.
Tags: News, Bible, Death and dying, Philosophy, Princeton, Religion and Belief, Jews and Judaism, Moulie Vidas




How far does individual freedom reach?

Classical liberals favor democracy because it operates as a ruling of the people by the people, rather than rule by someone else.This lends itself to the concept of negative freedom, or freedom from being compelled by the state or other authority to do something. So Daniel Jacobson, professor of philosophy at University of Michigan, raises the question: Do we have absolute sovereignty over our bodies?The crucial point for liberalism is that liberty ought to be the default. It shouldn't be easy t...
Tags: Learning, Education, Identity, Law, Democracy, Government, Happiness, Society, History, United States, Innovation, Philosophy, Humanity, University Of Michigan, Self, Daniel Jacobson


10 Buddhist quotes to help you navigate challenging times

Buddhism's recognition of nature's transience is particularly important right now. Mindfulness is an introduction to insight, which needs to be applied to navigate challenging times. The following 10 quotes provide a roadmap for dealing with our current struggles. Mindfulness is one of the Buddhism's major contributions to the modern world. Yet as psychotherapist Mark Epstein writes, often missed by the modern adoption of mindfulness is the fact that it serves as a practice for insight develop...
Tags: Facebook, America, Compassion, Meditation, Creativity, Innovation, Fear, Philosophy, Buddhism, Derek, Buddha, Buddhist, Stephen Batchelor, Epstein, Pankaj Mishra, Gotama


"Doctors have reckoned with the need to allocate resources in the face of overwhelming demand long before coronavirus."

"[Lydia Dugdale, professor of medicine and director of the center for clinical medical ethics at Columbia University] points out that the New York department of health’s ventilator allocation guidelines, published in November 2015 to address the issue amid a flu epidemic, states that first-come first-serve, lottery, physician clinical judgment, and prioritizing certain patients such as health care workers were explored but found to be either too subjective or failed to save the most lives. Age w...
Tags: New York, Law, Ethics, Italy, Philosophy, Columbia University, Birmingham, Ageism, University Of Alabama, Ann Althouse, David Chan, Coronavirus, Lydia Dugdale




Marcus Aurelius’ guide to becoming a morning person

Getting up in the morning stinks. Marcus Aurelius, the philosopher King of Rome, even had to write advice on getting up in his masterpiece Meditations.While the advice might not make you a fully fledged morning person, it might make getting up just a little easier. Let's be real, mornings can suck. Beds can be cozy, alarms can be irritating, and the idea of going to work can sound like a call to go on a death march. This is nothing new; people have been complaining about mornings since they inve...
Tags: Sleep, History, Rome, Innovation, Philosophy, Personal Growth, Marcus Aurelius, Aurelius, Ancient World, Pierre Hadot


"I'm happiness blogging today. Nothing interested me in the news. It's a good move to make when nothing in the news is interesting."

"I stumbled into a strategy, that is. I thought I'd just put up a quote from this book I was reading — Robert Louis Stevenson, An Apology for Idlers — and the quote was about happiness, so I started casting about for happiness items. Happily, there was no end to bloggable things."That's something I wrote on March 16, 2012 — Facebook just reminded me. I loved getting that prod, as I engage in a higher level of seclusion this morning... There's so much anxiety mixed with boredom these days that I...
Tags: Facebook, Photography, Law, Happiness, America, United States, Rick Santorum, Philosophy, Robert Louis Stevenson, Beatles, Brave New World, Gallup, Santorum, Romney, Voltaire, Gingrich


What is the place of human beings in the world

Philosophers disagree on what philosophy is supposed to do, but one popular candidate for what is part of the philosophical project is to try to understand the place of human beings in the world. What is our significance in the world as whole? What place do human beings have in the universe and in all of reality? These questions are not merely about how we are different from other creatures, or whether we are special in the sense that we are the best or worst at something. We might be the best a...
Tags: Books, Featured, Universe, Philosophy, God, Mind, Reality, Human Beings, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Idealism, Arts & Humanities, Thomas Hofweber, Mind.j, Lucas Wesney


Mumford -- Art and Technics (xii)

"In the case of photography...there was for long a question as to whether it was or was not art. And the answer to that question is: Is there any leeway for choice and initiative on the part of the photographer? If there is such leeway, there is a possibility of art, that is of success or failure in terms that would have significance to the beholder. Perhaps the best effect of machine art is to make us conscious of the play of the human personality in the small area where it remains free, a diff...
Tags: Technology, Creativity, Automation, Jazz, Philosophy, Technics, Mumford, Stefan Kac, Aesthetics, Art And Technics (mumford, Mumford (lewis, Functionalism And Functionalists, Machine Art


"I’ve been arguing that philosophers don’t need to believe in their arguments in order to make them. But what they do need to believe in is..."

"... the project of philosophical inquiry itself. A philosopher might offer up her argument in the absence of conviction but in the hopes of furthering the philosophical discussion around it. This is very different from someone who offers up a controversial claim in order to stir the pot of internet discourse, or enrage his opponents. While belief in one’s position can be laudable, it’s not the only laudable motive for doing philosophy. One can aim at truth even while reserving judgment on wheth...
Tags: Law, Economics, Lying, Atlantic, New York Times, Philosophy, Propaganda, Rhetoric, Krugman, Ann Althouse, Plakias, Sebastian Mallaby, Alexandra Plakias, Mallaby


The Meaning of Life According to Simone de Beauvoir

When someone presumes to explain the meaning of life, they usually draw, however vaguely, on religion. Many a philosopher has ventured a secular answer, but it’s hard to compete with the ancient stories of the world’s major faiths. The richness of their metaphors surpasses historical truth; humans, it seems, really “cannot bear very much reality,” as T.S. Eliot . Maybe we need stories to keep us going, which is why we love Plato, whose myth of the origins of love in his novella, the Sym...
Tags: Google, College, Philosophy, Albert Camus, Facebook Twitter, Plato, Sartre, Josh Jones, Popper, Jean Paul Sartre, Simone de Beauvoir, Karl Popper, Durham NC Follow, De Beauvoir, Iseult Gillespie, Eliot Maybe


How does the rule of law promote a free society?

The rule of law as a principle has a philosophical history before it was popularized by classical liberalism, which can be traced back to Greek philosopher Aristotle. The classical liberal conception of laws draws upon this pre-history but differs slightly. Yes, the end goal is the common good, however "goodness" varies by individual. In this way of thinking, instead of telling us what will make us happy, law serves as the framework that allows us to pursue our own unique happiness. ...
Tags: Europe, Education, Law, Government, Happiness, Society, History, Policy, United States, Innovation, Philosophy, Criminal Justice, Justice System, Aristotle


Let people change their minds

Everyone does it. Some people do it several times a day. Others, weekly, monthly, or even just a few times in their lives. We would be suspicious, and rightly so, of someone who claimed never to have done it. Some have even become famous for doing it. Making a public show of it can make or break a career. But how often is too often?I’m talking about changing one’s mind. As philosophers, we are often surprised when one of us reverses position on an issue. Hilary Putnam, for example, was famous fo...
Tags: Books, Publishing, Featured, Belief, Analysis, Philosophy, Truth, Arts & Humanities, Hilary Putnam, Alexandra Plakias, Changing One's Mind, Mind-changing


Jeremy Bentham’s Mummified Body Is Still on Display–Much Like Other Aging British Rock Stars

Plato’s ideal of philosopher-kings seems more unlikely by the day, but most modern readers of The Republic don't see his state as an improvement, with its rigid caste system and state control over childbearing and rearing. Plato’s Socrates did not love democracy, though he did argue that men and women (those of the guardian class, at least) should receive an equal education. So too did many prominent European political philosophers of the 18th and 19th centuries, who had at least as much...
Tags: Google, New York, London, College, France, Athens, Philosophy, Salvador Dalí, Leonard Cohen, Random, University College London, Metropolitan Museum Of Art, Atlas Obscura, University College, Facebook Twitter, Plato


Our ‘Pursuit of Happiness’ Is Killing the Planet

We need to strike a new balance between our private pleasures and our collective survival.
Tags: News, Greenhouse Gas Emissions, Philosophy, Politics And Government, Liberalism (US Politics


How fake things can still help us learn

We often appreciate things that have a certain weathered look about them. From clothes to home furnishings, people find aesthetic value in the distressed, the tarnished, the antique. Yet underlying this interest in the appealing look of age is an expectation that vintage things be of their vintage. Knockoffs, fakes, and otherwise inauthentic things are quick to undermine what aesthetic investment we might have had in their aged appearance.This response makes sense. If we value the look of age fo...
Tags: Books, Featured, Analysis, Philosophy, Vintage, Vermont, Gettysburg, Replicas, Fakes, Grand Street, Montshire Museum of Science, Norwich Vermont, Arts & Humanities, Erich Hatala Matthes, Arthur Danto, Inauthenticity


The awkward truth about choosing charities

None of us have infinite bank accounts so when we make charitable donations we have to weigh up how to do it most effectively. What is the most suffering you can reduce for the amount of money you have?Philosopher Peter Singer uses the Make-A-Wish Foundation as an example. It's a much loved charity for the joy it gives to dying children. Yet the cost of the average wish is $7,500—an amount that, if spent effectively, can save one, two, three, four, or more children's lives, says Peter Singer. "W...
Tags: Health, Death, Money, Activism, Life, Compassion, Innovation, Philosophy, Illness, Philanthropy, Peter, Peter Singer




The Coronavirus Is Us

We live in an interconnected world, where borders are porous, more like living membranes than physical walls.
Tags: News, Epidemics, Philosophy, Immigration and Emigration, Coronavirus (2019-nCoV