Posts filtered by tags: Prehistory[x]


 

New study of 2,600-year-old poop suggests Iron Age miners drank beer and ate blue cheese

An illustrated scene of the Hallstatt salt mountain in the early Iron Age. Reschreiter_Groebner/NHM Scientists analyzed the DNA in an ancient European salt miner's poop from some 2,600 years ago. They found the feces contained microbes consistent with the production of beer and blue cheese. Salt miners were previously thought to mostly eat gruel. The finding suggests they were more sophisticated. A new study of 2,600-year-old feces from an Iron Age salt miner suggested that workers at ...
Tags: Europe, Science, Trends, Austria, Italy, News UK, Slovenia, Prehistory, Unesco World Heritage, Frank Maixner, Hallstatt, Penicillium, Maixner, DNA analysis, Microbe, Brander


Researchers have found the remains of a teenager that died 7,200 years ago, revealing a group of humans previously unknown to science

Remains of a Toalean teenager in the Leang Panninge cave in Sulawesi. University of Hasanuddin Researchers examined 7,200-year-old DNA, revealing a previously-unknown group of early humans in Southeast Asia. The findings shed light on the prehistoric Toalean culture, which mysteriously disappeared 1,500 years ago. See more stories on Insider's business page. The remains of a 17-to-18-year-old girl who died about 7,200 years ago has revealed a prehistoric lineage of humans previously un...
Tags: Asia, Science, Tibet, Indonesia, Australia, Southeast Asia, Trends, Cnn, News UK, Siberia, Griffith University, Oceania, Sulawesi, Eurasia, Prehistory, Denisovans


The graves in a 13,000-year-old Egyptian cemetery didn't come from a single battle, as previously thought, but a long-lasting war likely driven by climate change, new study says

Remains of two individuals found at the Jebel Sahaba site, with pencils showing the position of artifacts. Images courtesy of the Wendorf Archives of the British Museum. Jebel Sahaba is one of the oldest known sites of mass conflict, dating back over 13,000 years. New research shows the deaths were caused by a series of violent clashes, rather than a single battle. This long-lasting war was likely a consequence of an abrupt change in climate around that time. See more stories on Insider...
Tags: Science, Climate Change, Trends, Egypt, News UK, Prehistory, Nile Valley, University of Bordeaux, Jebel Sahaba, Crevecoeur, Marianne Guenot, Wendorf Archives, Isabelle Crevecoeur


Projection artists recreated the world's oldest sundial on the winter solstice

On the eve of the 2020 winter solstice, creative production studio Algorithm.ie brought new life to a stone carving believed to be the world's oldest sundial. As part of Ireland's "Shine Your Light" program, organized by Creative Ireland and Raidió Teilifís Éireann, the company used projections and lighting design to illuminate the ancient Kerbstone at the Knowth Stone Age Passage Tomb at the historic Brú na Bóinne neolithic monument. — Read the rest
Tags: Post, News, Ireland, Lights, Visual Art, Lighting, Prehistory, Sundials, Lightshow, Projection Mapping, Kerbstone, Video Projection, Dynamic Projection Mapping, Brú na Bóinne, Neolithic Tombs


Dino-killing asteroid hit at "lethal" angle

Researchers hypothesize that the asteroid that gave the world over to mammals and birds hit Earth at a 60 degree angle, kicking up far more atmospheric dirt than a direct hit. The resulting climate change would be deadly for massive fauna and the ecosystems that depended on them—as the fossil record shows. Analysing the structure of the 200-kilometre-wide (125 mile) crater in southern Mexico where the asteroid hit, scientists ran a series of simulations. Lead author Gareth Collins of Imperial Co...
Tags: Post, News, Mexico, Dinosaurs, Collins, Imperial College London, Prehistory, Dino, University of Texas at Austin, University of Freiburg, Gareth Collins, AFP Adds Collins


42,0000+ year old string may have been made by Neanderthals

A recent piece in the journal Scientific Reports claims that remnants of twisted fiber found on a flint tool are between 42,000 - 52,000 years old and may have been made by Neanderthals. The tool and string were found in a cave in Southern France that was inhabited by Neanderthals. NPR's Nell Greenfieldboyce writes of the discovery: The discovery adds to growing evidence that our closest extinct human relative wasn't as dumb as scientists had long assumed. "They are this sort of ultimate 'other,...
Tags: Post, News, France, Discoveries, Ohio, Npr, Neanderthals, Prehistory, Scientific Reports, Bruce Hardy, Kenyon College, Archeaology, Nell Greenfieldboyce, Salmen Bejaoui


41,0000+ year old string may have been made by Neanderthals

A recent piece in the journal Scientific Reports claims that remnants of twisted fiber found on a flint tool are between 42,000 - 52,000 years old and may have been made by Neanderthals. The tool and string were found in a cave in Southern France that was inhabited by Neanderthals. NPR's Nell Greenfieldboyce writes of the discovery: The discovery adds to growing evidence that our closest extinct human relative wasn't as dumb as scientists had long assumed. "They are this sort of ultimate 'other,...
Tags: Post, News, France, Discoveries, Ohio, Npr, Neanderthals, Prehistory, Scientific Reports, Bruce Hardy, Kenyon College, Archeaology, Nell Greenfieldboyce, Salmen Bejaoui


41,000+ year old string may have been made by Neanderthals

A recent piece in the journal Scientific Reports claims that remnants of twisted fiber found on a flint tool are between 42,000 - 52,000 years old and may have been made by Neanderthals. The tool and string were found in a cave in Southern France that was inhabited by Neanderthals. NPR's Nell Greenfieldboyce writes of the discovery: The discovery adds to growing evidence that our closest extinct human relative wasn't as dumb as scientists had long assumed. "They are this sort of ultimate 'other,...
Tags: Post, News, France, Discoveries, Ohio, Npr, Neanderthals, Prehistory, Scientific Reports, Bruce Hardy, Kenyon College, Archeaology, Nell Greenfieldboyce, Salmen Bejaoui


Rare ‘Portable’ Paleolithic Art Depicts a Mysterious Scene Involving Birds and Humans

Dating back more than 12,000 years, this extraordinary example of rock art features a scene involving birds and humans—a rarity for the Paleolithic Period on several accounts. Read more...
Tags: Science, Prehistory, Rock Art, Paleolithic Period, Paleolithic Europe, Paleolithic Artists


Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow – How To Time Travel

It is 17,000 years ago. Massive sheets of ice cover Canada and the northern United States. You find yourself in the bowels of a large ice tunnel, at the edge of a massive glacier. The cold chills you to your bones. You hear blasts of icy wind whipping around outside the tunnel. At your feet, a trickling stream is choked by glacial till. Creaking sounds and the steady drip of water break the eerie silence. You have traveled back in time—sort of. Taking out your phone, you snap a photo of this inc...
Tags: Design, Exhibits, General, Education, Audio, Indiana, History, Empathy, Museum, Canada, United States, Museums, Exhibit, Exhibitions, Exhibition, Replica


Revealing the past of childhood before history

Through most societies of the human past, children comprised half the community. Archaeologists and their collaborators are now uncovering many aspects of the young in societies of the deep past, too long the ‘hidden half’ of prehistory.In coastal mud at Happisburgh in England, footprints of ancient Homo dating from 800,000 years ago include those of a child just 3ft, 3in high. In the caves of Upper Palaeolithic France, more footprints show adult cave painters were accompanied by children. Ochre...
Tags: Childhood, Books, Japan, England, Featured, Sweden, Children, France, Russia, Cyprus, Turkey, Ireland, South Dakota, Italy, Arizona, Argentina


Sweet Potato DNA Challenges Theory That Polynesians Beat Columbus to America

Christopher Columbus reached the New World in 1492, but some experts say Polynesian explorers beat him to it. There’s little evidence to support this fringe theory, but scientists have pointed to the presence of sweet potatoes, a plant thought to be native to the Americas, in the South Pacific as potential proof. A…Read more...
Tags: Science, Dna, Americas, America, Genetics, Anthropology, Archaeology, South Pacific, Columbus, Prehistory, Sweet Potatoes, Christopher Columbus, Polynesia, Human Migrations, Early Humans, Early Human Migrations


Neanderthal cave art

On 23 February this year, the American journal Science published an article by an international group of scientists and prehistorians. It presented a series of dates obtained from layers of calcite that had formed on top of drawings in three Ice-Age-decorated caves in Spain: La Pasiega in the north, Maltravieso in the centre, and Ardales in the south. The results—c. 64-66,000 years ago—are so early that it makes it certain that Neanderthals must have made these markings on cave walls. There is b...
Tags: Europe, Books, London, Featured, France, Spain, Archaeology, Natural History Museum, Archeology, Neanderthals, Cave Art, Dordogne, Prehistory, Sulawesi Indonesia, Arts & Humanities, Classics & Archaeology


Humankind’s battle to conquer the seas

The relationship, through history, between humans and the sea has been one of conflict and conquest. The dangers of traveling on such a fickle, treacherous, and alien environment could easily mean death for early seafarers and explorers (and indeed it still can today). What is even more impressive, and perhaps mind-boggling, is that those venturing to sea in pre-history did not know what they would find, if anything at all. So why did humans first take to the sea? What drove them to surf and sai...
Tags: Europe, Books, Featured, History, Atlantic, Archaeology, Prehistory, Atlantic Ocean, Mediterranean Sea, Humankind, Barry Cunliffe, Arts & Humanities, Ancient History, European History, Josh Sorenson, AD 1500


10 great reasons to visit Carnac, Brittany, France

Having recently spent around 10 days in Carnac in southern Brittany, we thought it would be fitting to share 10 great reasons to visit this popular French seaside resort. Located in the heart of Quiberon Bay, and close to Brittany’s Gulf of Morbihan, Carnac enjoys a healthy influx of tourists, particularly in high season (July […] The post 10 great reasons to visit Carnac, Brittany, France appeared first on A Luxury Travel Blog.
Tags: Europe, Featured, France, Attractions, Food And Drink, Sailing, Beach, Beaches, Brittany, Standing Stones, Regions, Going Out, Western Europe, Travel Miscellany, Prehistory, Brittany Ferries


This Extinct Frog Probably Ate Crocodiles and Dinosaurs

Poison aside, frogs are generally weak and pathetic. Dinosaurs, meanwhile, range from weak and pathetic to huge and strong, so I’m going to say they’re generally “not weak.” But 70 million years ago, things were different. Extinct species of frogs like the Beelzebufo ampinga grew to be ten pounds in size. Maybe they…Read more...
Tags: Science, Biology, Evolution, Prehistory, Evolutionary Biology, Dumb Looking Prehistoric Beasts, Crazy Frog


Louis Leakey’s quest to discover human origins

Louis Leakey remains one of the most recognized names in paleoanthropology and of twentieth century science. Leakey was a prolific writer, a popular lecturer, and a skillful organizer who did a great deal to bring the latest discoveries about human evolution to a broader public and whose legacy continues to shape research into the origins of mankind. Many people have found important fossils relating to human evolution, yet Louis and Mary Leakey’s excavations at Olduvai Gorge have attained an ico...
Tags: Asia, Europe, Books, Featured, Congress, Africa, Society, South Africa, Tennessee, Anthropology, Kenya, Tanzania, Fossils, Neanderthals, Rwanda, Prehistory


Art of the Ice Age [slideshow]

In 2003 Paul Bahn led the team that discovered the first Ice Age cave art at Creswell Crags in Britain. In recent years, many more discoveries have been made including the expanding phenomenon of ‘open-air Ice Age art’. Information gathered from advanced dating methods have revolutionized our knowledge of how cave art was created and when it was created. For instance, we now know that the art found at Creswell Crags must have been created at least 12,800 years ago. This may seem like a long time...
Tags: Images, Art, Europe, History, Slideshow, Britain, Egypt, Brazil, Archaeology, Horse, Prehistory, Ice Age, Editor's Picks, Vero Beach Florida, Bahn, Wikimedia Commons


Neanderthal Experts Wish You Wouldn't Insult Neanderthals By Comparing Them to Politicians

It’s very common to lump the backward and the brutish into the category of “Neanderthal.” Well, Neanderthal experts don’t appreciate your casual trashing, thanks. Read more...
Tags: Neanderthals, Prehistory


The Grotte du Mas d’Azil Cave, Midi-Pyrenees, France

Deep in the heart of the Midi-Pyrenees, France, is a massive cave that has been inhabited for more than 30000 years. It’s called the Grotte du Mas d’Azil and you can drive through it. Driving down the Pyrenees after spending a week in the mountains, I was on my way to Toulouse to meet Alison on her return from French Guiana. I had two days before our rendezvous at the train station but my only plan was to visit Airbus the morning we were to meet. Otherwise, I was just making short jumps toward...
Tags: Europe, France, Natural, History, Nature, Museum, Drive, Driving, Toulouse, Road Trip, Alison, Historic, Slow Travel, Lascaux, Prehistory, Slow Travel In France


Discovering Prehistoric Art at Lascaux II, Dordogne, France

To appreciate the UNESCO listed prehistoric cave paintings of Lascaux, France, you must take a tour. We descend into Lascaux II to discover 17,000 year old art. On September 12th, 1940, Marcel Ravidat stumbled into a cave system painted with thousands of images more than 17,000 years old. These artworks are remarkable not just for their age, but also for the painters’ use of perspective and depth. More than simple stick figures, paintings of bulls, horses, stags, bison, birds, and more come al...
Tags: Travel, Art, France, Painting, History, Museum, Unesco, Activity, Tour, World Heritage Site, Alison, Bordeaux, Historic, Slow Travel, Aquitaine, Cave Painting