Posts filtered by tags: Psychology[x]


 

Stock market bubbles: Our evolutionary roots explain why investors follow the herd

Stock market bubbles, or asset bubbles, refer to a situation where stocks are valued far above what they're fundamentally worth.Unique factors contribute to each stock market bubble, but all play out in a generally similar series of stages.Research on the human social brain network offers insight into why investors participate in asset bubbles.In retrospect, there were clear signs that the stock market bubble was about to burst in 2000.The mid 1990s was a time of rapid technological growth and,...
Tags: Psychology, Europe, Japan, Money, Innovation, Reddit, Behavioral Economics, Federal Reserve, Priceline, Platt, Fred, Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, Michael Platt, Asch, Hyman Minsky, Solomon Asch


"I miss the momentum of already being out of the house when the workday ends, so I don’t have to overcome the inertia of the couch to head out somewhere else."

"I miss industrial-strength Wi-Fi that always works. I miss the daily reminder that my work takes place in a real world full of people and places, not an imaginary world within my computer. And I’m sick of taking from my own cache of toilet paper when I use the bathroom during the workday. Sure, the stuff in the office restroom isn’t exactly plush. But I’m not there to linger over the pleasures of lavish bathroom supplies. I’m there to work—in a place where my employer subsidizes my trips to the...
Tags: Psychology, Law, Labor, Bathrooms, Ann Althouse, Christina Cauterucci Slate


‘Virulent microbes everywhere’: how can anxious people fend off reopening panic?

Re-emerging from lockdown can feel fraught with danger, especially for people with a history of anxietyI recently took my first flight since the pandemic began. As I arrived at the airport, I prepared for a scene of utter carnage: people everywhere, all of them insisting on breathing; virulent microbes reveling in a field of unsuspecting targets.As someone with a history of anxiety, I took a deep breath – figuring it would be my last opportunity to do so before landing – and entered the fray. Co...
Tags: Psychology, Science, Society, Mental Health, Anxiety, Coronavirus


The era of Covid ambivalence: what do we do as normalcy returns but Delta surges?

We imagined a gleeful summer of pandemic relief. Instead, new anxieties have replaced old onesWe were promised a Hot Vax Summer.The term – a riff on Hot Girl Summer, the hit 2019 summer single – emerged this spring as predictive shorthand for the (perhaps literally) orgiastic welcome of a post-vaccine reality. But, as might be expected of a phenomenon named for the last great summer anthem of a world before Covid-19, Hot Vax Summer connoted more than a gleeful exchange of fluids. It came to sign...
Tags: Psychology, Life and style, World news, US news, Mental Health, Delta, Coronavirus


Martin Turpin: ‘Bullshitting is human nature in its honest and naked form’

The cognitive scientist explains the link between intelligence and telling fibs – and why lying is such a common form of communication in fields from art to politicsMartin Turpin is a PhD researcher at the department of psychology at the University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada, who is studying linguistic bullshit. He is the lead author of a recent paper entitled Bullshit Ability As an Honest Signal of Intelligence, which found that people who produce “satisfactory bullshit” are judged to be of h...
Tags: Psychology, Science, Language, Turpin, University of Waterloo Ontario Canada, Martin Turpin, Honest Signal of Intelligence


‘It was devastating’: what happens when therapy makes things worse?

Therapists are meant to help people change their lives, but those who behave badly may end up doing more harm than goodCourtney thought it was strange when her therapist asked her to follow him on Instagram. She had begun seeing Michael – a psychoanalyst who has written books and appeared on television – to treat her fear of flying in 2018 (both of their names, and those of all the patients in this article have been changed). After a few sessions, he suggested the pair connect on Instagram, wher...
Tags: Psychology, Health, Instagram, Education, Life and style, Society, Mental Health, Health & wellbeing, Michael, Courtney


B.F. Skinner Demonstrates His “Teaching Machine,” the 1950s Automated Learning Device

The name B.F. Skinner often provokes darkly humorous references to such bizarre ideas as “Skinner boxes,” which put babies in cage-like cribs, and put the cribs in windows as if they were air-conditioners, leaving the poor infants to raise themselves. Skinner was hardly alone in conducting experiments that flouted, if not flagrantly ignored, the ethical concerns now central to experimentation on humans. The code of conduct on torture and abuse that ostensibly governs members of the...
Tags: Psychology, Facebook, Education, College, History, Harvard, Noam Chomsky, Durham NC, Skinner, American Psychological Association, Watters, Solanki, Audrey Watters, Ladies Home Journal, Abhishek Solanki, Gillian Anderson Josh Jones


Smart technology (probably) isn’t making you dumber

A new paper in Nature Human Behaviour states that technology is not making us dumber. The authors believe smart technology changes how we engage our biological cognitive abilities.While fears are likely overblown, technology addiction and memory problems still need to be addressed.It seems that every major scientific or technological advancement is immediately labeled "dangerous" by critics. The printing press was going to destroy our memory. Pasteur's groundbreaking work was followed by an ant...
Tags: Psychology, Technology, London, Social Media, Neuroscience, Society, Innovation, Derek, Reliance, Pasteur, Big Problems, Lorenzo Cecutti, Anthony Chemero, Chemero


DMT: the strongest psychedelic you’ve never heard of

Psychedelic therapy shows promise where other mental health treatments have failed. DMT, an incredibly powerful drug, may be particularly useful in conjunction with therapy.The use of DMT is still highly experimental and possibly dangerous. As psychedelic research returns to the mainstream of medical science, several lesser known drugs are being seen as possible therapies for mental illness. One of these is DMT, which is the subject of a slew of new studies about its potential use in treati...
Tags: Psychology, Drugs, Mental Health, Brain, Depression, Innovation, Consciousness, Peru, South America, Routledge, James Kent, Terence McKenna, Freethink, Carol Routledge, Small Pharma, Stephen Szára


Does the term “neurodiversity” do more harm than good?

There's been a recent push to label those with abnormal neuropsychological behaviors as "neurodiverse" rather than "autistic" or "dyslexic."This is an attempt to both remove the stigma attached to these abnormalities and also to call into question whether there is any such thing as a normal brain.The problem with getting rid of neuropsychological labels, however, is that it risks ignoring those individuals with developmental issues who need help. "Neurodiversity" is an umbrella term that encom...
Tags: Psychology, Neuroscience, Mental Health, Brain, Innovation, Oxford, Neurodiversity, Jonny Thomson, Natasha Connell


Two-thirds of couples start out as friends, research finds

Average length of friendship before relationship turns romantic is 22 months, study saysWhen Harry first met Sally, he asserted men and women could not be friends because the “sex part always gets in the way”.But new research suggests roughly two-thirds of couples start out as friends and maintain a platonic relationship for long periods before sparking a romance. Continue reading...
Tags: Psychology, Science, Relationships, Friendship, Life and style, Sally


Finding The Love Your Soul Yearns For

Love! Is there someone for everyone? … Read More...
Tags: Psychology, Videos, Advice, Astrology, Real Life, Attraction, Past-lives, Love Tips


Moralities of Everyday Life: A Free Online Course from Yale University

How can we explain kindness and cruelty? Where does our sense of right and wrong come from? Why do people so often disagree about moral issues? This course from Yale University, Moralities of Everyday Life, explores the psychological foundations of our moral lives. Taught by psychology & cognitive science professor Paul Bloom, the course focuses on the origins of morality, compassion, how culture/religion influence moral thought and moral action, and beyond. If you select the “Audi...
Tags: Psychology, Facebook, College, Online Courses, Yale University, Paul Bloom, Yale University Moralities of Everyday Life, Yale University Positive Psychology, Harvard University A Crash Course, Hank Green Moralities


People with a 'growth mindset' are better problem-solving - here are 4 ways to develop one, according to experts

A growth mindset is when you have an evolving arsenal of interests and passions. Martin Steinthaler/Getty Images People with healthy growth mindsets are often more curious and motivated to learn new things. Researchers from Yale-National University of Singapore say this mindset can be developed with practice. Instead of expecting to simply 'find' your passions, make an intentional effort to nurture and develop them. See more stories on Insider's business page. If the pandemic t...
Tags: Psychology, Google, Trends, Strategy, Skills, Passion, Problem Solving, Nus, Mindset, Nordic, Harry Houdini, Keefe, Growth Mindset, Paul O Keefe, Yale National University of Singapore, Yale NUS


"Drinking not only allows wary, self-interested individuals to drop their guard and collaborate, he writes, it also facilitates the creativity and playfulness our species needs to innovate and survive."

"A negroni will essentially wipe out the prefrontal cortex, the site of pragmatic, grown-up thinking. Zap the same region with a transcranial magnet and you’ll get the same results: happier, less inhibited, more childlike adults. Given that transcranial magnets are 'expensive, not very portable and typically not welcome at parties,' alcohol remains a handy, low-tech tool to get good will and fresh ideas flowing. For our ancestors, inebriation was especially essential, 'a robust and elegant respo...
Tags: Psychology, Books, Law, Wikipedia, History, Drinking, Reddit, Joe, Göbekli Tepe, Joe Rogan, Golden Triangle, Ann Althouse, Slingerland, Edward Slingerland, Oliver Dietrich


Do you get pseudo-hallucinations? Test yourself here

Consider the statements below. What do they describe? A trip on psychedelics? A dream? I felt I could reach through the screen to get to another place. Lasers became entire fans of light sweeping around, and then it felt as if the screen began to expand. I saw old stone buildings … like a castle … I was flying above it.In reality, they are statements that different people reported after viewing the “Ganzflicker" on their computers – an intense full-screen, red-and-black flicker that anyone can...
Tags: Psychology, Neuroscience, Brain, Innovation, Mind, Senses, Ganzflicker


They’re Vicious, You’re Gullible – Then What?

Today my husband learned of some lies someone told on him a few years ago.  He also found out the lies were believed though they seem outrageous to me. Anyone with common sense should have been able to see through … Read More...
Tags: Psychology, Lying, Astrology, Real Life, 8th-house


Tome Jones at 81, sings about aging on his new album

NPR and Bob Boilen | June 7, 2021: "We're publishing this Tom Jones Tiny Desk (home) concert on his 81st birthday. It's a poignant moment in the life of a singer whose career spans 56 years and more than 100 million records sold; the passing of his wife, Linda, in 2016 after 59 years of marriage was devastating and resulted in the longest break between recordings of his career. But now Tom Jones is back with a new album, Surrounded By Time, and ready to share his deepest feelings, channeling son...
Tags: Psychology, Health, Facebook, Music, Bob Dylan, Npr, Las Vegas, Tom Jones, Longevity, Linda, Bob Boilen, Malvina Reynolds, Geriatrics, Bobby Cole, Tome Jones


"Surfside’s mayor, Charles W. Burkett, said on Friday that he was worried about the stability of the north building but did not feel 'philosophically comfortable' ordering people to evacuate."

I'm reading (NYT).In retrospect, we naturally feel that the building should have been evacuated, and it seems perverted for the mayor not to have felt "philosophically comfortable" with ordering evacuation. But how many mayors right now are on notice of major structural damage equivalent to that 2018 report on Champlain Towers? Will they order people to evacuate? Or will the "philosophical comfort" remain on the side of letting people stay in their homes?We're built to feel secure in the sense...
Tags: Psychology, Safety, Law, Disaster, America, Surfside, Ann Althouse, Burkett, Kylos, Champlain Towers, Charles W Burkett


Middlescence = time between adolescence and senescence

Middlescence is defined as the time between adolescence and senescence. "It is a paradox of life that we do not begin to live until we begin to die. Death begins at thirty, that is, deterioration of the muscle cells sets in."https://royalsocietypublishing.org/doi/pdf/10.1098/rsnr.2020.0008 From the video below: Life begins at 40: the biological and cultural roots of the midlife crisis | The Royal Society. In this lecture, Professor Mark Jackson, winner of the 2018 Wilkins-Bernal-Medawar Medal, e...
Tags: Psychology, Health, Facebook, Mark Jackson, Wilkins Bernal Medawar Medal


What is awe and where can you get more of it?

Awe can instill a sense of wonder, spark creativity, make us humble, and fuel kindness and connection with others. This isn't new age or religious mumbo-jumbo (although "awe" is sometimes hijacked by those groups). Awe can also be weaponized in order to exert control. — Read the rest
Tags: Psychology, Post, Science, News, Wonder, Everything Is Awesome


How to give a talk/present a lecture - by MIT/Patrick Winston

 Some goods points in the video below. Quality = f (K P t) -- explained at beginning:  Patrick Winston's How to Speak talk has been an MIT tradition for over 40 years. Offered every January, the talk is intended to improve your speaking ability in critical situations by teaching you a few heuristic rules.00:16 - Introduction03:11 - Rules of Engagement04:15 - How to Start05:38 - Four Sample Heuristics10:17 - The Tools: Time and Place13:24 - The Tools: Boards, Props, and Slides36:30 - Info...
Tags: Psychology, Health, Facebook, Education, Mit, Patrick Winston


How the pandemic got us addicted to longing – and why it’s bad for us

I learned first-hand about longing through decades of celibacy – but why do we do it, and how can we stop?I was a 35-year-old virgin when I realized I was addicted to longing. I got off on the high of anticipating sex I knew I wasn’t going to have, and then masochistically wallowed when letdown inevitably followed.My crushes were the popular guys in high school, the elusive seat-mate on an airplane ride, and the soldiers shipped overseas. I binge-watched When Harry Met Sally and planned weekend ...
Tags: Psychology, Health, Science, Sex, Relationships, Life and style, Society, Consumer affairs, Mental Health, Harry Met Sally, Facebook Continue, Coronavirus


Adolescent suicide: Our children are not all right

A study of adolescents who attempted suicide sheds some jight into causes and preventative strategies The post Adolescent suicide: Our children are not all right appeared first on The Mail & Guardian.
Tags: Psychology, Health, Wellness, Opinion, Suicide, Adolescence, Openaccess, COVID-19


Ask Philippa: meet the Observer’s brilliant new agony aunt

As psychotherapist and author Philippa Perry becomes our new agony aunt, she reveals why helping you with your worries will help us all. Plus, a special welcome from Jay RaynerJohn Dunton founded the Athenian Mercury in the 1690s. A paper that consisted of readers’ questions and the answers. His idea was that readers could send in dilemmas to be answered by a panel of experts, the Athenian Society. But his great innovation was that they could do so anonymously and this has remained a feature of ...
Tags: Psychology, Health, Science, Media, Life and style, Society, Newspapers & magazines, Newspapers, Mental Health, Dunton, Philippa Perry, Philippa, Jay RaynerJohn Dunton


How a cancer diagnosis inspired a fresh outlook for one young musician

At the age of just 22, the very last thing you want to hear is that you have stage 4 cancer, but for some people the only response is to tackle it head on – which is just what Ellie Edna Rose-Davies didI barely noticed it at first. A bump on the right side of my neck, small but definite. I was 22 and had no health issues (I’d never even broken a bone), so I didn’t think much of the lump. But my boyfriend was concerned, so I made an appointment to go to the GP.For the next few months, I would see...
Tags: Psychology, Health, Music, Science, Cancer, Life and style, Culture, Health & wellbeing, Goat Girl, Ellie Edna Rose Davies


Pupil size surprisingly linked to differences in intelligence

Researchers find a correlation between pupil size and differences in cognitive ability.The larger the pupil, the higher the intelligence.The explanation for why this happens lies within the brain, but more research is needed.What can you tell by looking into someone's eyes? You can spot a glint of humor, signs of tiredness, or maybe that they don't like something or someone. But outside of assessing an emotional state, a person's eyes may also provide clues about their intelligence, suggests new...
Tags: Psychology, Atlanta, Intelligence, Brain, Innovation, Mind, Iq, Emotional Intelligence, Georgia Institute of Technology, Tsukahara, Jason Tsukahara


The Rashomon Effect: The Phenomenon, Named After Akira Kurosawa’s Classic Film, Where Each of Us Remembers the Same Event Differently

Toward the end of The Simpsons’ golden age, one episode sent the titular family off to Japan, not without resistance from its famously lazy patriarch. “Come on, Homer,” Marge insists, “Japan will be fun! You liked Rashomon.” To which Homer naturally replies, “That’s not how I remember it!” This joke must have written itself, not as a high-middlebrow cultural reference (as, say, Frasier would later name-check Tampopo) but as a play on a universally understood byword for the nature of huma...
Tags: Psychology, Facebook, Japan, Film, College, West, Literature, Akira Kurosawa, Seoul, David Eagleman, Kurosawa, Homer, Michio Kaku, Marge, Rashomon, Colin Marshall


Why does life flash before your eyes in a life-threatening scenario?

At the age of 16, when Tony Kofi was an apprentice builder living in Nottingham, he fell from the third story of a building. Time seemed to slow down massively, and he saw a complex series of images flash before his eyes. As he described it, “In my mind's eye I saw many, many things: children that I hadn't even had yet, friends that I had never seen but are now my friends. The thing that really stuck in my mind was playing an instrument". Then Tony landed on his head and lost consciousness. When...
Tags: Psychology, Death, UK, London, Time, Memory, Brain, Innovation, Nottingham, Mind, Einstein, Steve Taylor, Tony, Immanuel Kant, Gill Hicks, Carlo Rovelli


The power of authority: how easily we do what we’re told

In the 1960s, Stanley Milgram was sure that good, law-abiding Americans would never be able to follow orders like the Germans in the Holocaust.His experiments proved him spectacularly wrong. They showed just how many of us are willing to do evil if only we're told to by an authority figure.Yet, parts of the experiment were set up in such a way that we should perhaps conclude something a bit more nuanced. Holding a clipboard and wearing a lab coat makes you a very powerful person. Add in a lany...
Tags: Psychology, Evil, Ocean, Innovation, Oxford, Phillip Zimbardo, Adolf Eichmann, Stanley Milgram, Milgram, Asch, Stockphotos, Jonny Thomson