Posts filtered by tags: Psychology[x]


 

'There's a gaping hole in our knowledge': the scientists studying why gamers invert their controls

Our article asking why so many players invert their controls provoked a fierce debate that has now caught the attention of researchers into visual perceptionIt is one of the most contentious aspects of video game playing – a debate where opposing sides literally cannot see each other’s perspective. When the Guardian ran an article asking why a large minority of game players invert the Y axis on their controls – meaning that they push their joypad’s thumb stick down to move upwards on the screen ...
Tags: Psychology, Games, Science, Technology, Culture, Guardian


Is the new New Yorker cover shockingly depressing?

Is this cover intentionally dark? Christ pic.twitter.com/2CryDhwTAd— Joe Gabriel Simonson (@SaysSimonson) December 1, 2020 Simonson also tweets: "This woman is alone, living in squalor and drinking." Prescription drugs too. (Click on the image to see the full cover. There's lots of stuff on the floor.) Simonson adds: "People say it’s meant to be dark but this interview with the artist doesn’t make that clear." And he links to this piece in The New Yorker, an interview with the artist Adrian ...
Tags: Psychology, Amazon, Law, Drawing, Cartoons, Emotions, Christ, The New Yorker, Edward Hopper, Adrian Tomine, Simonson, Ann Althouse, Tomine, Coronavirus, Joe Gabriel Simonson


The magic of mushrooms: A mycological trip

The unmatched biologist-reporter Tomasz Sitarz interviews his fungal namesake, maślak sitarz – known in English as the Jersey cow mushroom. The humble fungus turned out to be quite a sage and agreed to share a few pieces of invaluable advice with the Homo sapiens species. In the summer, I went camping with my friends. On the first day after our arrival, I woke up early to take a walk and pick some chanterelles for breakfast. As bad luck would have it, however, I left my glasses in the tent, and...
Tags: Psychology, Food, Science, Biology, Drugs, Earth, Nature, West, Innovation, Jersey, Cap, Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, Aspergillus, Aga ZanoReprinted, Tomasz Sitarz


Creative therapy and shared support can help with grief after losing a child

A retreat for grieving parents provides therapeutic benefits, writes a mother whose daughter was stillborn 22 years agoAfter my daughter Grace died when I was eight months pregnant, my first impulse was to write it all down: the birth, surrounded by candles; the coffin and funeral where there should have been a christening; how her death had been accompanied by snowdrops fighting their way through the frozen ground in the first stirring of spring. I felt I was the only one really to have known h...
Tags: Psychology, Family, Science, Life and style, Health & wellbeing, Death and dying, Parents and parenting, Grace


Legendary Harvard psychologist Dan Gilbert outlines 8 money principles will bring you the most happiness for your dollar

Shopping: It'll bring you happiness. Getty Images Money buys happiness, says Harvard psychologist Dan Gilbert, if you spend it right. As in: Avoid big purchases that you'll just get used to and fail to appreciate. And imagine what it will be like to live with a purchase after you but it. Spend well, and you'll quite likely make yourself happier. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Money can't buy happiness."This sentiment is lovely, popular, and almost certainly wron...
Tags: Psychology, Personal Finance, Science, Money, Happiness, Success, Trends, Research, Earth, Harvard, Spending, George Clooney, University Of Virginia, Tesla Roadster, Dan Gilbert, University of British Columbia


3 reasons for information exhaustion – and what to do about it

An endless flow of information is coming at us constantly: It might be an article a friend shared on Facebook with a sensational headline or wrong information about the spread of the coronavirus. It could even be a call from a relative wanting to talk about a political issue. All this information may leave many of us feeling as though we have no energy to engage. As a philosopher who studies knowledge-sharing practices, I call this experience “epistemic exhaustion." The term “epistemic" comes fr...
Tags: Psychology, Facebook, News, Learning, Knowledge, Social Media, Mental Health, United States, Innovation, American Psychological Association, Garry Kasparov, Lilliana Mason, James Owen Weatherall, Kevin Vallier, Cailin O Connor, Michael Hannon


"Spring will come. There will be teachers again with eyes on kids and in-person social workers and doctors and librarians."

"They will help do the job of paying attention, of answering questions. There will be a vaccine. This period, like a war, will end. And like a war, its effects will linger, too. Children will tell their children about what it was like to grow up now, in the year of no school, no parties, no playdates, no kissing. Kids are resilient. It is possible to reverse the destructive effects of toxic stress on the developing brain. Astonishing research on child soldiers in Sierra Leone has shown that even...
Tags: Psychology, New York, Children, Law, Sierra Leone, Ann Althouse, Child Mind Institute, Harold Koplewicz, Coronavirus


I'm a survivor! How resilience became the quality we all crave

During the pandemic it has become a buzzword for successfully steering through adversity. But what exactly is resilience - and can you cultivate more of it? It was after her block of flats burned down that Sadi Khan thought, finally, things could not get worse. She had married at 19, and for four years her husband had subjected her to horrific violence on an almost daily basis. She had been punched and kicked, financially controlled and constantly told she was stupid; once, a friend arrived at h...
Tags: Psychology, Health, Life and style, Society, Mental Health, Health & wellbeing, Khan, Sadi Khan


How psychedelics help you "die before you die"

The concept of "dying before you die" lies at the heart of religious tradition, argues Brian Muraresku.This secret ritual connects the Eleusinian Mysteries with the origins of Christianity. In "The Immortality Key," Muraresku speculates that psychedelic wine could have been the original Christian Eucharist. After a 20-year ban on clinical psychedelics research, the U.S. government approved trials on DMT in 1990. At first, Rick Strassman, a clinical associate professor of psychiatry at the Univ...
Tags: Psychology, Facebook, Death, Drugs, Religion, David, Christianity, Innovation, Storytelling, Catholic, Damascus, Johns Hopkins, Hopkins, Derek, Peter, Mdma


"Consider what happens when you’re thirsty and drink a glass of water. The water takes about 20 minutes to reach your bloodstream, but you feel less thirsty within mere seconds."

"What relieves your thirst so quickly? Your brain does. It has learned from past experience that water is a deposit to your body budget that will hydrate you, so your brain quenches your thirst long before the water has any direct effect on your blood. This budgetary account of how the brain works may seem plausible when it comes to your bodily functions. It may seem less natural to view your mental life as a series of deposits and withdrawals.... Every thought you have, every feeling of happin...
Tags: Psychology, Law, Brain, Emotion, Lisa Feldman Barrett, Ann Althouse


Does One-upmanship Have A Place In Soccer?

Your players are constantly trying to better each other with harder shots, tricks and flicks, and by staying behind longer after training. Should you encourage this kind of one-upmanship and competitiveness? MORE
Tags: Psychology, Blog, Sport, Soccer


Why Did Scorpio Cut You Off?

There is a good discussion going here – Scorpio Dead Zone, which I really should have called the Scorpio Kill Zone. I’ve written about Scorpio amputating people over the years (search). Typically the person who is cut off is left … Read More...
Tags: Psychology, Scorpio, Astrology, Relating, 8th-house, Scorpio Dead Zone


The Loveless, Causing Confusion And Torment

I read a poem from the 1800’s that challenged me to think. The poem was about a man who loves a woman who does not love him because she can’t love him. She can’t love because it’s herself whom she … Read More...
Tags: Psychology, Art, Love, Astrology, Relating, Venus-Pluto


Are humans cruel by nature?

How have humans managed to accomplish significantly more than any other species on the planet? Historian Rutger Bregman believes the quality that makes us special is that we "evolved to work together and to cooperate on a scale that no other species in the whole animal kingdom has been able to do."Pushing back against the millennia-old idea that humans are inherently evil beneath their civilized surface, which is known as 'veneer theory', Bregman says that it's humanity's cooperative spirit and ...
Tags: Psychology, Animals, Friendship, Society, War, Sociology, Innovation, Collaboration, Philosophy, Evolution, Morality, Humanity, Bregman, Rutger Bregman


A game designer explains the success of QAnon, in terms of game design

Reed Berkowitz is the director of the Curioser Institute, which explores the structure and psychology of storytelling through interactive experiences — largely using games, particularly with augmented reality. As a professional game designer, he's been fascinated by QAnon, and the ways it seems to have exploited and subverted the tools of interactive gaming with almost frightening efficiency and deliberate intention. — Read the rest
Tags: Psychology, Post, News, Augmented Reality, Conspiracy Theories, Gamification, Game Design, Game Development, Interactive Art, ARG, Interactive Fiction, QAnon, Psychological Experiments, Reed Berkowitz, Curioser Institute


New bed, no sleep? First night blues

Have you ever woken up in a new place and noted with disappointment that you are still tired? I am thinking, for example, of the first night in a hotel at the start of your holidays, a night staying with friends, or the first night of a business trip. We aren't talking here about the first night with a new lover, because then there are other variables at play that might give false results in the study we want to conduct.The phenomenon of FNE, or 'first night effect', has been known of for a long...
Tags: Psychology, Health, Sleep, Brain, Innovation, Consciousness, Human body, Masako Tamaki, Yuki Sasaki, Annie JaroszewiczReprinted


'Muscular bonding': The strange psychological effects of moving together

Muscular bonding, a term coined by the veteran and historian William McNeill, describes how individuals engaged in synchronous movement often experience feelings of euphoria and connection to the group.Psychologists have proposed that muscular bonding, or interpersonal entrainment, is a group-level adaptation that helped early human groups outcompete other groups.Muscular bonding can help people form cohesive groups, but it could come at cost. Humans have a penchant for moving together in uniso...
Tags: Psychology, Sociology, Innovation, Evolution, Morality, Humanity, McNeill, Jonathan Haidt, Haidt, IPE, William McNeill


'I'll never be the same again': facing family trauma in a Nazi concentration camp

Filmmaker Anthony Giacchino and producer Alice Doyard explain how a young history student persuaded Colette, 90, to visit the German concentration camp where her brother diedThe new Guardian documentary, Colette, follows the remarkable story of a former member of the French resistance, as she travels to Germany for the first time to the Mittelbau-Dora concentration camp where her brother died 75 years ago. Persuaded to go on the journey by history student Lucie, 17, the pair support one another ...
Tags: Psychology, Europe, Family, France, Germany, History, Holocaust, Second world war, Weapons technology, Nazism, Colette, Lucie, Anthony Giacchino, Forced Labour, Alice Doyard, Mittelbau Dora


Psychological Programming Designed To Destroy You

I continue to be sick of the boring bickering back and forth that has consumed our culture. I have written about gaslighting for nearly two decades. I’ve also written about how important it is to control your own mind. That … Read More...
Tags: Psychology, Astrology, Real Life, Shadow, Discuss, Psychopaths, 8th-house


Why schools should not teach general critical-thinking skills

Being an air-traffic controller is not easy. At the heart of the job is a cognitive ability called 'situational awareness' that involves 'the continuous extraction of environmental information [and the] integration of this information with prior knowledge to form a coherent mental picture'. Vast amounts of fluid information must be held in the mind and, under extreme pressure, life-or-death decisions are made across rotating 24-hour work schedules. So stressful and mentally demanding is the job ...
Tags: Psychology, Productivity, Learning, Memory, Neuroscience, Brain, United States, Innovation, Mary, SHELLEY, Willingham, Victor Frankenstein, Mary Shelley, Daniel Willingham, Carl HendrickThis


When rearranging a drawer is restful: the magic of ‘pottering’

How small tasks can benefit our state of mindFor Anna McGovern there is a satisfying, sensory pleasure to be had in rinsing milk bottles: “The very best thing about getting your milk delivered is ‘rinsing and returning’. Don’t cheat by putting your bottles in the dishwasher. Wash them, by hand. Put a small amount of water in the bottle, slosh the water around, put your hand over the top, shake it up and down, upturn the bottle, glugging the water out, then head for your doorstep and put out the ...
Tags: Psychology, Science, Life and style, Health & wellbeing, McGovern, Anna McGovern


Brains have different beauty centers for art and faces – study

A new study shows that different parts of the brain are engaged when we look at beautiful faces or beautiful art.Reward pathways are triggered by looking at beauty in faces.Another part of the brain is involved in judging beauty in art, indicating existence of two "beauty centers". What makes something or someone beautiful to our minds? Is there an innate perception of beauty that's maintained throughout all scenarios? Interestingly, a new study concludes that our brains have not one but two se...
Tags: Psychology, Art, Biology, Neuroscience, Brain, Innovation, Research Digest, Tsinghua University China, Richard Prum, Human body, Hu Chuan Peng


Our brains have different 'beauty centers' for art and faces

A new study shows that different parts of the brain are engaged when we look at beautiful faces or beautiful art.Reward pathways are triggered by looking at beauty in faces.Another part of the brain is involved in judging beauty in art, indicating existence of two "beauty centers." What makes something or someone beautiful to our minds? Is there an innate perception of beauty that's maintained throughout all scenarios? Interestingly, a new study concludes that our brains have not one but two se...
Tags: Psychology, Art, Biology, Neuroscience, Brain, Innovation, Research Digest, Tsinghua University China, Richard Prum, Human body, Hu Chuan Peng


"And their eyes — wow, it was like someone turned the lights on."

The image is from Earl Shaffer's Appalachian Hike Diary (1948), every page of which you can see at that link, at the Smithsonian website. I'm reading about Shaffer this morning in "Walking off the War on the Appalachian Trail," a new article at Gaia GPS. The author is Abby Levene.Shaffer was the first person to through-hike the Appalachian Trail: He travelled alone, walking around 17 miles a day. Shaffer packed light. He nixed a tent when he realized his poncho could double as a shelter. He men...
Tags: Psychology, Health, Eyes, Law, Shoes, Sports, Georgia, Marine, Military, Maine, Smithsonian, Bill Bryson, Henry David Thoreau, Walden, Shaffer, Appalachian Trail


Are brain teasers and apps a waste of time?

There is little research to prove that brain games improve general cognition or slow cognitive decline. Rather they simply make you better at playing that specific brain game.Brain teasers are a useless tool during job interviews as they can't predict how an interviewee will perform in real world tasks relevant to the job role. Exercise, nutrition, socialization, and meditation are probably better brain boosters. ​Brain training apps and programs have sky-rocketed into a billion-dollar market ...
Tags: Psychology, Health, Google, Memory, Intelligence, Brain, Puzzles, New York Times, Innovation, Florida State University, Western University, Ontario Canada, FSU, Laszlo Bock, Wally Boot


'Mindful' people are better goal-setters according to new research

Self-concordant individuals set goals in alignment with their beliefs and values, according to new research. Internal motivations score higher than external influences, such as money or fear of shame. Mindful individuals achieve more satisfaction, as their goals align with their authentic selves. The practice of mindfulness involves the development of nonjudgmental awareness of the present moment. While derived from Buddhist meditation practices, it became an important tool for clinical psychi...
Tags: Psychology, Motivation, Facebook, Happiness, Mindfulness, Mental Health, Innovation, Mcgill, Derek, Goal-setting, Don, Buddhist, Journal of Research, Carleton University of Toronto


The Matrix is already here: Social media promised to connect us, but left us isolated, scared and tribal

About a year ago I began to follow my interest in health and fitness on Instagram. Soon I began to see more and more fitness-related accounts, groups, posts and ads. I kept clicking and following, and eventually my Instagram became all about fit people, fitness and motivational material, and advertisements. Does this sound familiar?While the algorithms and my brain kept me scrolling on the endless feeds, I was reminded of what digital marketers like to say: “Money is in the list." That is, the m...
Tags: Psychology, Facebook, Instagram, Internet, Social Media, Society, Web, Innovation, Algorithm, Pew Research Center, Twitter Instagram, Frankenstein, Matrix, NPR BBC, Maryna Arakcheieva, Arash Javanbakht


What’s Your Opinion Of Psychic Vampires Or Energy Thieves?

This is an old post but I’m thinking energy thieves today and I knew I’d written about this before. I’m pulling up the old post up because the comments are great.  Here it is: s said on Using Other People’s … Read More...
Tags: Psychology, Energy, Currency, Astrology, Real Life, Discuss, 8th-house


Covid-19: what can we learn from the London blitz? – podcast

Ian Sample speaks to Prof Edgar Jones about the comparative psychological impacts of the blitz bombings of London and the Covid-19 pandemic. Including the role trust in government plays and what we might expect during the second wave of infections Continue reading...
Tags: Psychology, Health, Science, London, Society, Ian Sample, Edgar Jones


How to Be a Gracious Winner

There are few things more personally gratifying than winning. This is true for pickup basketball games and presidential elections alike. Read more...
Tags: Psychology, Etiquette, Behavior, Lifehacks, Adulthood