Posts filtered by tags: Rimbaud[x]


 

Celine Launches Rimbaud

When in 2019, Hedi Slimane took over as creative director of CÉLINE, he gave new life to the brand. The same year, he also introduced the Celine Haute Parfumerie Collection, featuring nine high-end fragrances. In 2022, the collection is joined by the tenth: Rimbaud, a fragrance named after the French poet Arthur Rimbaud. Recently, Blackpink's Lisa was chosen as the face of the first adverti... Read full article: Celine Launches Rimbaud from Fragrantica Perfumes and Colognes Magazine.
Tags: Fashion, Celine, Hedi Slimane, Lisa, Rimbaud, Arthur Rimbaud, Fragrantica Perfumes, Blackpink, Celine Launches Rimbaud


Pantruche.

Another passage from Luc Sante’s The Other Paris (see this post): It was Lutèce, or Lutetia, under the Romans, and became Paris around 300 C.E. François Villon called it Parouart in his fifteenth-century thieves’ cant; Rimbaud called it Parmerde in a letter written in 1872. Sometime in the early nineteenth century, people started referring to it as Pantin — ironically, since Pantin was then a rustic village on the plain northeast of the city (the word also means “puppet,” which may have had some...
Tags: Uncategorized, Paris, Linguistics, Panama Canal, Panama, Parisien, Rimbaud, Luc Sante, Pantin, Liebling, Jean Gabin, Francois Villon, Albert Simonin Auguste, Breton San Antonio, Lino Ventura Today


Rimbaud's remains will not be moved to Panthéon, rules Macron

President decides against relocating remains of French poet to Parisian memorialThe remains of the famed French poet Arthur Rimbaud will not be moved to the Panthéon mausoleum despite a campaign to honour him as an artist and symbol of gay rights, the French president, Emmanuel Macron, has decided.A petition last year backed by a number of celebrities as well as the culture minister, Roselyne Bachelot, called for Rimbaud to be reinterred alongside his lover and fellow poet Paul Verlaine at the m...
Tags: Europe, Books, France, Poetry, World news, Culture, Paris, Pantheon, Emmanuel Macron, Rimbaud, Macron, Arthur Rimbaud, Paul Verlaine, Roselyne Bachelot


Patti Smith & Fred “Sonic” Smith Perform a Stripped-Down, Beautiful Version of “People Have the Power”

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yEX_f4_5Yio It’s fitting for the day, even though it was recorded long ago (1990). The footage above features Patti Smith and her departed husband Fred “Sonic” Smith performing a stripped-down, acoustic version of her classic “People Have the Power.” A rare recording of Smith and Sonic performing together, this is a little treasure. Savor the moment. People have the power The power to dream, to rule To wrestle the world from fools It’s decreed: the people ...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, College, Patti Smith, Smith, Facebook Twitter, Fred, Rimbaud, Susan Sontag Patti Smith, Lenny Kaye St Mark, Patti Smith Fred


"And just so you know, because all Biden does is talks about COVID. Right? He doesn’t call it the China virus. You know why?"

"Because China has him paid off. He can’t use that term. They gave his son one and a half billion to manage. He makes millions of dollars a year, I assume. Right?... He walked in, he walked out with one and a half billion. Hey, maybe he’s not so stupid after all. Right? That’s the only thing. I thought he was so dumb. Maybe he’s not as dumb as we think.... The biggest story, no, the second biggest story, the worst was when they spied on my campaign and they got caught. That’s the biggest politic...
Tags: Law, China, Russia, Poetry, Biden, Tampa, Trump, Adam Schiff, Rimbaud, Tampa Florida, Adam Gopnik, Arthur Rimbaud, Ann Althouse, Insults, Trump rhetoric, Russia Russia Russia


"Incoherent stories of extreme experience."

It's a podcast.... Topics: "Woke movies, the dreary 33.1% GDP spurt, Kanye’s way, kind of like Verlaine and Rimbaud, enough is enough in France, Democrats and Republicans sleeping together, Trump’s womanliness." And if you listen to podcasts on iTunes, please subscribe to The Althouse Podcast here. [Author: [email protected] (Ann Althouse)]
Tags: Podcast, Law, France, Kanye, Trump, Rimbaud, Verlaine, Ann Althouse


"By the testimony of Dylan’s mentor Dave Van Ronk, it was a paperback copy of modern French verse, heavy with underlining..."

"... which a fresh-from-Minnesota Dylan took down from Van Ronk’s bookshelf, on Macdougal Street, in 1960—that provided the impetus for that poet’s own stream of imagery. Rimbaud’s 'A Season In Hell' gave the idea that poetry should be, first of all, a journey into extreme experience, evidenced not by a coherent evocation of a story but by subversive images and sensual evocations that subvert logic and language itself. (Dylan’s great songs from 'Blonde on Blonde'—'Sad-Eyed Lady of the Lowlands' ...
Tags: New York, Crime, Minnesota, Law, California, France, Poetry, Bob Dylan, Jack Black, Kurt Cobain, Dylan, Johanna, Rimbaud, Verlaine, Adam Gopnik, Dave Van Ronk


France divided over calls for Arthur Rimbaud and Paul Verlaine to be reburied in Panthéon

Petition says the poets, who were lovers as young men, were ‘the French Oscar Wildes’ and deserve to rest in the mausoleumFrance’s cultural elite are split over whether the remains of two of the country’s greatest poets, Arthur Rimbaud and his lover Paul Verlaine, should be dug up and re-interred in the Panthéon in Paris.The secular mausoleum is home to French greats including Voltaire, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Émile Zola, Alexandre Dumas and Marie Curie. Now a petition signed by more than 5,000 p...
Tags: Europe, Books, France, Poetry, World news, Culture, Paris, Marie Curie, Pantheon, Emmanuel Macron, Rimbaud, Verlaine, Arthur Rimbaud, Paul Verlaine, Roselyne Bachelot, Oscar Wildes


Rimbaud and Verlaine: France agonises over digging up gay poets

There is mounting pressure to have two of France's best-loved poets reinterred in the Paris Pantheon.
Tags: News, France, Rimbaud, Verlaine


Hear Patti Smith’s First Poetry Reading, Accompanied by Her Longtime Guitarist Lenny Kaye (St. Mark’s Church, 1971)

There are so many origin stories of punk that no single history can count as definitive. But there’s also no disputing its roots in the New York poetry scene from which Patti Smith emerged in the 1960s and 70s. She learned from Allen Ginsberg and William S. Burroughs, and Gregory Corso and Sam Shepherd inspired the poetry/rock hybrid that would become the music of Horses. Corso, who called himself a “punk debauche” in his 1960 poem “1959,” lived up to the label. He would heckle poets...
Tags: Google, Music, New York, College, New York City, Poetry, Patti Smith, Smith, St Marks, Facebook Twitter, Bertolt Brecht, McLeod, Rimbaud, Josh Jones, Jim Morrison, William S Burroughs


Hear Patti Smith’s New Work With The Soundwalk Collective, a Tribute to the Avant-Garde Poet Antonin Artaud

The Soundwalk Collective has made music art out of found sounds since 2004. They recorded 2012’s Medea while traversing the Black Sea and fishing for sounds using a scanner and high powered aerial antennas; 2014’s Last Beat used contact microphones on the architecture of a music club to collect vibrations instead of music; 2017’s Before Music There Is Blood collaged deep echoing recordings of classical music played in various halls. This time, in their upcoming The Peyote Dance, they hav...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Mexico, France, Russia, India, Paris, Ethiopia, Patti Smith, Smith, Black Sea, Ibiza, Eastern Europe, French Guiana, Nico


My Search for Ben Weber

Ben Weber was an enigma. He was a twelve tone composer whose lushly harmonic music is often described as tonal. He was a deeply serious, intellectual artist in the metaphysical mold of Schoenberg and Busoni. At the same time, he was famous in artistic circles for his impromptu, hilarious yet oddly poignant drag performances of opera performed for close friends at his West Village apartment. Weber’s music was performed and recorded by the most distinguished conductors and performers of his day—Le...
Tags: New York, Berlin, New York City, Religion, Jerusalem, Diamond, Analysis, Chicago, David, New York Times, Marilyn Monroe, David Hockney, Times, Upper West Side, Pacific Ocean, The New Yorker


“The Deuce” Stinks. A Rant.

I’m a hair’s-breadth away from declaring that “The Deuce,” HBO’s Sunday night “prestige drama” about flesh-peddling and pornos in Times Square and 42nd Street in the mid-70s, is an exercise in trolling, some kind of meta-level commentary on the lack of drama, characterization, or stakes in, y’know, pornos. It’s almost easier to believe that David Simon — the creator of “The Wire” FFS! — is engaged in some kind of multimillion-dollar performance art than that he’s presiding over a writing room as...
Tags: Hbo, Lawrence Gilliard, California, La, Offtopic, Seo, James Franco, Elvis Costello, Patti Smith, Jfk, Maggie Gyllenhaal, Keith Richards, D'angelo, Carroll, Times Square, Simon


Patti Smith Reads Oscar Wilde’s 1897 Love Letter De Profundis: See the Full Three-Hour Performance

In her landmark study The Body in Pain, Elaine Scarry describes “the annihilating power of pain,” which is “visible in the simple fact of experience observed by Karl Marx, ‘There is only one antidote to mental suffering, and that is physical pain.’” Marx’s comment defines a class distinction between types of pain: that of the overtaxed body of the worker and the mind of the bourgeois subject with the liberty for morbid self-reflection. His pronouncement, Scarry writes, is “only slightly ...
Tags: Google, College, Ireland, Literature, Karl Marx, Patti Smith, Smith, British Library, Oscar Wilde, Virginia Woolf, Marx, Facebook Twitter, Rimbaud, Wilde, Josh Jones, Susan Sontag


Peter Mishler's Playlist for His Poetry Collection "Fludde"

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book. Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Lauren Groff, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others. Awarded the 2016 Kathryn A. Morton Prize in Poetry, Peter Mishler's collection Fludde is inventive and expansive, an impressive debut. The Rumpus wrote of the book: "Mishler’s def...
Tags: Music, Noah, Chicago, Courtney Love, David, Arkansas, New Jersey, Brian Wilson, John, Benjamin Britten, Christ, Mel, Rogers, Noye, Britten, Atomic Books Comics Preview


Richard Hell and the Voidoids: Blank Generation: 40th Anniversary Deluxe Edition

If you ever want to start a fistfight in a group of rock history know-it-alls, just pop this little question: "Was it the US or the UK who created punk rock?" Within five minutes, I guarantee there'll be chairs flying and dozens of bloodstained Guided By Voices T-shirts. One thing they'll all agree on is who gave punk rock its look. That person, ladies, and gentlemen is Richard Hell. Whilst trying to manage the New York Dolls, Malcolm McLaren spotted Hell in his customized, thrift...
Tags: Music, UK, New York, London, US, Hell, Bob Dylan, Punk, Grateful Dead, Hotel California, Rimbaud, Charlie Parker, Julian, Robert Quine, Johnny Rotten, Malcolm McLaren


Book Notes - Richard F. Thomas "Why Bob Dylan Matters"

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book. Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others. Richard F. Thomas's Why Bob Dylan Matters is a must-read book for fans of the recent Nobel Laureate, one that examines the legitimacy of Dylan's lyrics as poetry through the e...
Tags: Music, New York, London, Minnesota, Mississippi, California, Wikipedia, Boston, New York City, John Lennon, US, Woody Guthrie, Barcelona, Bbc, Rome, Gotham


Bronwyn Reviews: Eve Out of Her Ruins

Eve Out of Her Ruins by Ananda Devi Translated from the French by Jeffrey Zuckerman Pages: 160 Publisher: Deep Vellum Released: 2016   Reviewed by Bronwyn Mauldin  Saadiq is still hanging on in school, finding kinship in the poetry of Rimbaud and trying to write his own story on his bedroom wall with a marker. Clélio is a thug who’s been in and out of jail all through his youth. Savita is the good girl trying hard to set an example for her younger sister. Eve is the beautiful, bon...
Tags: Books, UK, US, International court of justice, Rhode Island, Chagos Islands, Mauritius, Indian Ocean, Great Britain, United Nations General Assembly, Rimbaud, Devi, Eve, PORT LOUIS, Mesa Verde National Park, Bronwyn


Hear Patti Smith Read the Poetry that Would Become Horses: A Reading of 14 Poems at Columbia University, 1975

Note: The first poem and others contain some offensive language. In the context of the radical socio-political change of 1975, Patti Smith announced herself to the world with Horses, “the first real full-length hint of the artistic ferment taking place in the mid-‘70s at the juncture of Bowery and Bleecker,” writes Mac Randall. Though born in an insular downtown milieu, Smith’s view was vast, conducting the poetry of the past—of Rimbaud, the Beats, and rock and roll—into an uncertain fut...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Poetry, Jimi Hendrix, The Guardian, Columbia University, Patti Smith, Smith, Christ, Virginia Woolf, Facebook Twitter, Robert Mapplethorpe, Brian Jones, Rimbaud, Josh Jones


Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week - July 6, 2017

In the weekly Librairie Drawn & Quarterly Books of the Week, the Montreal bookstore recommends several new works of fiction, art books, periodicals, and comics. Librairie Drawn & Quarterly is one of Montreal's premiere independent bookstores. The Art of Death: Writing the Final Story by Edwidge Danticat The newest notch in Graywolf Press’ wonderful The Art of Series—edited by Charles Baxter—is The Art of Death by Edwidge Danticat, a simultaneously deeply personal account of her mother’s de...
Tags: Music, America, David, Montreal, Atomic Books Comics Preview, Librairie Drawn Quarterly Books of the Week, Rimbaud, Charles Baxter, Atwood, Librairie Drawn Quarterly, Edwidge Danticat, Margaret Atwood Johnnie Christmas Tamra Bonvillain, Graywolf Press, Erika L Sánchez Erika L Sánchez, Angela J Davis, Angel Catbird Vol


Patti Smith Buys Arthur Rimbaud's House

The dwelling, which is located near the French border with Belgium in a small town called Roche, is a reassembled version of Rimbaud's childhood home. It was here that the late 19th-century French poet wrote his most famous piece, A Season in Hell, when he was merely 19 years old.
Tags: Art, People, House, Belgium, Patti Smith, Roche, Rimbaud, Arthur Rimbaud, 03.23.17


Discover the 1126 Books in John Cage’s Personal Library: Foucault, Joyce, Wittgenstein, Virginia Woolf, Buckminster Fuller & More

Image by or Rob Bogaerts/Fotocollectie Anefo To properly honor your cultural role models, don’t try to do what they did, or even to think what they thought, but to think how they thought. This goes at least double for John Cage, the experimental composer whose innovative works can be, and often are, re-staged (go on, have four minutes and 33 seconds of silence to yourself), but it takes a different kind of effort altogether to cultivate the kind of mind that would come up with them in the firs...
Tags: Google, Books, Music, Japan, College, Los Angeles, Marilyn Monroe, Literature, Philosophy, New York Public Library, Seoul, James Joyce, Cage, David Foster Wallace, Darwin, Ludwig Wittgenstein


The Velvet Underground & Andy Warhol Stage Proto-Punk Performance Art: Discover the Exploding Plastic Inevitable (1966)

Punk rock, an artless proletarian sneer, a working-class revolt against bourgeois tastes, good manners, and corrupt systems of consumption. Right? Sure… and also pure performance art. Or do we forget that its forebears were avant-garde fringe artists: whether Iggy Pop onstage fighting a vacuum cleaner and blender and smearing peanut butter on himself, or Patti Smith reading her Rimbaud-inspired poetry at CBGB’s. And before rock critic Dave Marsh first used the word “Punk” (to describe Quest...
Tags: Google, Art, Music, New York, London, College, Chicago, Jimi Hendrix, Paris, Andy Warhol, Warhol, Patti Smith, Shakespeare, Lou Reed, Velvet Underground, Andy


Gun that nearly killed poet Rimbaud fetches 435,000 euros

The most famous gun in French literary history, the revolver with which Paul Verlaine tried to kill his lover and fellow poet Arthur Rimbaud, sold for 434,500 euros ($460,000) at auction in Paris on Wednesday. Verlaine bought the weapon in Brussels on the morning of July 10, 1873, determined to put an end to his torrid two-year affair with his teenage lover. The 29-year-old poet had abandoned his young wife and child to be with Rimbaud, who would later become the symbol of rebellious youth, idol...
Tags: News, Paris, Brussels, Rimbaud, Verlaine, Arthur Rimbaud, Paul Verlaine


Gun that wounded French poet Rimbaud sold at auction

The revolver used to wound French poet Arthur Rimbaud fetches over €430,000 at auction.
Tags: News, Rimbaud, Arthur Rimbaud


Gun that nearly killed poet Rimbaud sells for almost half million euros

The most famous gun in French literary history, the revolver with which Paul Verlaine tried to kill his lover and fellow poet Arthur Rimbaud, sold for 434,500 euros ($460,000) at an auction in Paris on Wednesday. Verlaine bought the weapon in Brussels on the morning of July 10, 1873, determined to put an end to his torrid two-year affair with his teenage lover. The 29-year-old poet had abandoned his young wife and child to be with Rimbaud, who would later become the symbol of rebellious youth, i...
Tags: News, Paris, Brussels, Rimbaud, Verlaine, Arthur Rimbaud, Paul Verlaine


The Photography of Poet Arthur Rimbaud (1883)

Arthur Rimbaud, far-seeing prodigy, “has been memorialized in song and story as few in history,” writes Wyatt Mason in an introduction to the poet’s complete works; “the thumbnail of his legend has proved irresistible.” The poet, we often hear, ended his brief but brilliant literary career when he ran off to the Horn of Africa and became a gunrunner… or some other sort of adventurous outlaw character many miles removed, it seems, from the intense symbolist hero of Illuminations and A Season in...
Tags: Google, Europe, Photography, College, Poetry, Ethiopia, Patti Smith, Lyon, Facebook Twitter, Horn of Africa, Rimbaud, Josh Jones, Harar, Arthur Rimbaud, Durham NC Follow, Haile Selassie


Thoughts on Dylan’s Nobel

Of all the responses to Bob Dylan’s Nobel, my favorite comes from Leonard Cohen, who likened it to “pinning a medal on Mount Everest.” It’s a brilliant line, pure Cohen—all dignity and poise, yet with an acid barb. Not only is Everest in no need of a medal, the attempt to fix one to its impassive torso (imagine the puny pin bending back on first contact) is metaphorically all too apt for the Nobel committee’s current quandary. To the surprise of exactly no one, Dylan took his time responding to ...
Tags: Books, Music, Featured, Washington, Poetry, Bob Dylan, Everest, Johnson, Shakespeare, Kerouac, Lyrics, AAA, Mount Everest, Mccartney, Leonard Cohen, Songs


Gun that nearly did for poet Rimbaud up for sale

The most famous gun in French literature, the revolver with which the poet Paul Verlaine tried to kill his lover Arthur Rimbaud, is going under the hammer, Christie's said Wednesday. Verlaine bought the 7mm six-shooter in Brussels on the morning of July 10, 1873, determined to put an end to his torrid two-year affair with his teenage lover. The 29-year-old poet had abandoned his young wife and child to be with Rimbaud, who would later become the symbol of rebellious youth.
Tags: News, Brussels, Christie, Rimbaud, Verlaine, Arthur Rimbaud, Paul Verlaine


Book Notes - Affinity Konar "Mischling"

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book. Previous contributors include Bret Easton Ellis, Kate Christensen, Lauren Groff, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Jesmyn Ward, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others. Affinity Konar's masterfully told and lyrical novel Mischling may be the year's most poignant book. The Dallas Morning News wrote of the book: "Drawn from the abundant docum...
Tags: Music, Washington Post, Los Angeles, David, Bob Dylan, Bernadette Peters, Steve Martin, Grimes, Dallas Morning News, Judy, Auschwitz, Alan Vega, Kirkus, Martin, Publishers Weekly, Atomic Books Comics Preview