Posts filtered by tags: Roger-Ebert[x]


 

This Anti-Minimalist Nail Trend Is Straight Out Of 1983

Everyone remembers the ‘80s differently. Some think Madonna, white-lace hair accessories, and perms, while others see Kangol and Jheri curls. But for designing duo Phillipe and David Blond of The Blonds, the indulgent decade is defined by one memory — specifically, one movie: Scarface. When the 1983 film starring Al Pacino as Cuban refugee-turned-drug kingpin Tony Montana premiered, it skyrocketed to the zeitgeist for its unprecedented levels of violence and drug use — and for the decadent live...
Tags: Fashion, Music, Instagram, Montana, Roger Ebert, Madonna, Grace Jones, Peta, Karrueche Tran, Al Pacino, Arnold, Gertrude, Huang, Debbie Harry, Hancock, Ebert


Visual Feasts: Merchant Ivory Do What They Do Best in 'Feast of July'

None Left in the lurch by the movie-going public in 1995, Feast of July was probably one of the more demure productions to come out of the Merchant Ivory workshop. Based on a minor work by H.E. Bates, who wrote mostly charming and very British novels about the English working life, the film was further sidelined by its rather unenthusiastic critical reception. Time, however, has been kind to the film and it isn't really the forgettable fluff that the likes of Roger Ebert claimed it to be. Lift...
Tags: Music, Crime, Review, Drama, America, Roger Ebert, Period Drama, Mystery, Spielberg, Hugh Grant, Film Review, Bella, Chaplin, Ben Chaplin, Ebert, Blu Ray


‘Blazing Saddles’ at 45: The Legendary Comedy is Both Hilarious and Troublesome in 2019

Depending on who you listen to, so-called “PC culture” is the scourge of modern comedy. Stand-up comedians (primarily those who are older and white, which is clearly a weird coincidence) often rail against the notion that younger, more diverse audiences aren’t too excited at the prospect of laughing at humor targeting wide cultures of people by utilizing hoary stereotypes. The world of film comedy has had many examples of massively successful films that are proudly offensive, from Animal...
Tags: Comedy, Hollywood, Movies, NFL, Features, Roger Ebert, Johnson, Kansas City, Mel-Brooks, Bart, Blazing Saddles, Brooks, Richard Pryor, Warner Bros Pictures, Frankenstein, Gene Wilder


The Sex Pistols’ Sid Vicious Sings Frank Sinatra’s “My Way”: Is Nothing Sacred?

In the great garden of forking paths and alternative timelines there are two other versions of The Great Rock n’ Roll Swindle that Julian Temple never directed. One would have been directed by Graham Chapman of Monty Python fame, but “he behaved gloriously badly to Malcolm (McLaren)” according to John Lydon many years later. The other was to be written by film critic Roger Ebert and directed by buxom beauty lover Russ Meyer (who Lydon called "shabby” and “a senile old git.”) But you do h...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, UK, College, West, Roger Ebert, Paris, Monty Python, Mclaren, Frank Sinatra, Nancy, Martin Scorsese, Julien Temple, Facebook Twitter, Rolling Stones


Writing about Gov. Northam this morning, I went looking for the old Ted Danson blackface routine (the one Whoopi Goldberg dared him to do)...

... and I found this parody by Howard Stern. How can Stern survive when that's on YouTube?Man, he commits to the mocking racism with over-the-top racism. Interesting to see Sherman Hemsley (AKA George Jefferson) in the role of Whoopi Goldberg.And what about Joni Mitchell? And Tom Hanks? And Sarah Silverman?I couldn't find video of the old Ted Danson effort, but here's an article with a still photo. ADDED: Further research suggests that there was never any videotape of Danson's performance — a Fr...
Tags: Comedy, New York, Law, Wikipedia, America, Tom Hanks, Roger Ebert, Howard Stern, Whoopi Goldberg, Joni Mitchell, Beverly Johnson, Sugar Ray Leonard, Blackface, Ted Danson, Jefferson Airplane, Stern


Disclosure, Dasein, and the Divine in Terrence Malick's 'The Tree of Life'

None The tree of life is a common metaphor for the interconnectedness of all beings. While this metaphor is a familiar framework for ecological thinking—all regions, systems, and species are interwoven and inseparable—the tree of life is also a provocative paradigm for thinking about creativity. The Tree of Life is also both the name of Terrence Malick's 2011 masterpiece and an apt descriptor for his creative process, as evident by The Criterion Collection's 2018 release. The Criterion's rel...
Tags: Feature, Music, Jessica Chastain, Hollywood, Texas, Drama, Germany, Fantasy, US, America, Earth, Mit, Harvard, Roger Ebert, Oxford, Brad Pitt


Two Artists With Wildly Different Styles Create Stunning Posters of Your Favorite Video Games

The late, great Roger Ebert once expressed the controversial opinion that video games can’t be art. And while he was certainly entitled to that point of view, there are cases where it’s factually false—like a new art exhibit that’s soon to open in Los Angeles.Read more...
Tags: Science, Video Games, Roger Ebert, Posters, This Is Awesome, Gallery 1988, Los Angeles Read, Alexander Wells, James Gilleard


Safety Last, the 1923 Movie Featuring the Most Iconic Scene from Silent Film Era, Just Went Into the Public Domain

Safety Last, the 1923 film starring Harold Lloyd, features one of the most iconic scenes from the silent film era. Writes Roger Ebert, the scene above is "by general agreement the most famous shot in silent comedy: a man in a straw hat and round horn-rim glasses, hanging from the minute hand of a clock 12 stories above the city street. Strange, that this shot occurs in a film few people have ever seen. Harold Lloyd's Safety Last (1923), like all of his films, was preserved by the comedia...
Tags: Google, Film, College, Roger Ebert, Michel Hazanavicius, Public Domain, Facebook Twitter, Harold Lloyd, Power of Silent Movies


Highlights for Dec. 31, 2018-Jan. 6, 2019

More haste, less speed Dates and times are given for U.S. Pacific Time zone. Click them to see the date and time where you are. Civilization M ost of us don’t consider ourselves particularly violent. But few have never squashed a bug, eaten meat, or delighted in the misfortune of a rival, and that’s the violence of Mars at work. If we are threatened, pestered, or prevented from getting something we want, Mars springs into action. Mars has been in Pisces since November 15, and its bloodl...
Tags: Roger Ebert, Sun, Catholic, Mars, Saturn, Jupiter, Pluto, Capricorn, Aries, Sagittarius, Astrology, Pisces, Shriners, Alan Watts, Weekly, Weekly highlights


Second Act — Movie Review

I’m no Roger Ebert, and it can therefore be somewhat difficult to articulate why a movie doesn’t quite land. In the case of Second Act, it’s pretty easy.  The movie is so on-the-nose predictable it feels as if the writer took its formula from a screenwriting book on Amazon and just plugged in new names. … Continue reading "Second Act — Movie Review" The post Second Act — Movie Review appeared first on The Dishmaster.
Tags: Amazon, General, Religion, Movie Reviews, Roger Ebert, Jennifer Lopez, Second Act


‘Schindler’s List’ and ‘Shoah’: How Two of the 20th Century’s Greatest Films Illuminate Each Other

Two of the 20th century’s greatest films are bound together by the same historical tragedy. When it arrived in theaters in mid-December 1993 — just six months after his summer blockbuster, Jurassic Park — critics and audiences alike embraced Steven Spielberg’s Schindler’s List as a masterpiece. More than just an awards season drama, the film provided what’s been called a “first foundational encounter with the Holocaust” for a whole generation of viewers. It soon emerged as the crowning achie...
Tags: Europe, Hollywood, Movies, Nazis, America, Bbc, Features, Netflix, Roger Ebert, New York Times, Oscar, Poland, Liam Neeson, Ken Burns, Ralph Fiennes, Spielberg


50 Under 50 - Part VI: Success!

I started my resolution to watch 50 movies made before 1950 in 2018 in March. While I'd already watched a couple of qualifying movies, I was still several movies behind for a good portion of the year. For progress so far: [Part I | Part II | Part III | Part IV | Part V] After a strong showing during the Six Weeks of Halloween horror movie marathon, I had made up that shortfall and then some. This past week, I officially hit 50 films made before 1950. I will definitely see a few more before year'...
Tags: Hollywood, Movies, Cary Grant, Wings, Roger Ebert, New Mexico, Grant, Rian Johnson, Lake, Veronica Lake, Sullivan, Bing Crosby, Fred Astaire, Hitchcock, Femme Fatale, Ernst Lubitsch


How ‘Star Wars’ Borrows From ‘Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid’

(Welcome to The Movies That Made Star Wars, a series where we explore the films and television properties that inspired (or in this case help us better understand) George Lucas’s iconic universe. In this edition: Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid .) Losing the screenwriter William Goldman was a blow to the world of cineastes last month. He was one of the sharpest writers ever to come to Hollywood and he had a distinct way of playing a tense scene for laughs and making giggle at how good i...
Tags: Hbo, Hollywood, Movies, Western, Sci-fi, Features, Roger Ebert, Lucasfilm, Goldman, George Lucas, Paul Bettany, Bolivia, Robert Redford, Naboo, Ebert, Paul Newman


The Evolution of Peter Jackson: From Cult Filmmaker to Industry-Shaking Oscar-Winner [Part 1]

Peter Jackson has two new movies out this December, and each represents a vastly different side of the New Zealand cinema titan. Mortal Engines, which Jackson produced and co-wrote, is the kind of giant fantasy blockbuster he has become known for, while They Shall Not Grow Old, his (non-faux) documentary debut, stems from an entirely different part of his sensibilities. Thus, it’s worth taking a look at how we got here – and how Jackson’s career has changed him as a filmmaker. The E...
Tags: Hollywood, Movies, South Park, Features, Roger Ebert, Andy Serkis, New Zealand, Kate Winslet, Jackson, Robert Zemeckis, Peter-Jackson, King, Cannes, Michael J Fox, Kiwi, Walsh


The Best of the Cinematic Slow Clap

The Best of the Cinematic Slow Clap The slow clap is one of the absolute strangest cinematic cliches out there.  Has there been any time, ever, in real life, that you witnessed a slow clap? Only in an ironic situation would that EVER happen.  However, time and time again, movies feel the need to start slowly and crescendo the applause. Maybe, the filmmakers feel a need to start low and end high?  The crazy thing is, it usually works. PB = PB || {}; gptAd...
Tags: Amazon, Feature, Movies, Ben Affleck, Disney, Roger Ebert, Rudy, Maggie, John Candy, Notre Dame, Lucas, Charlie Sheen, Kevin Smith, Sweeney Todd, J Lo, Ollie


All Of Amanda Bynes' Major Roles, Ranked

Photo: Jon Kopaloff/FilmMagic. After a revealing and honest interview with PAPER Magazine, announcing her return to acting, Amanda Bynes is back in the spotlight. Let's revisit her best roles.With the recent 10th anniversary of She's the Man, the announcement of an All That reunion special (which she unfortunately won't be joining), and her 30th birthday on April 3, we can't help but continue to be nostalgic for Amanda Bynes.Her wit, charm, and unique characters were all so quintessentially ...
Tags: Fashion, Music, England, Hollywood, Amanda Bynes, Roger Ebert, Paris, Sydney, Broadway, Paul Giamatti, Jason, Colin Firth, Nickelodeon, Penny, Harry Connick Jr, Amanda


Watch Jeff Beck Smash His Guitar While Jimmy Page & the Yardbirds Jam By His Side: A Classic Scene from Antonioni’s Blowup (1966)

Art film and rock and roll have, since the 60s, been soulmates of a kind, with many an acclaimed director turning to musicians as actors, commissioning rock stars as soundtrack artists, and filming scenes with bands. Before Nicolas Roeg, Jim Jarmusch, David Lynch, Martin Scorsese and other rock-loving auteurs did all of the above, there was Michelangelo Antonioni, who barreled into the English-language market, under contract with Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, with a trilogy of films steeped in th...
Tags: Google, Music, Film, College, Beck, Roger Ebert, Mtv, Graham, Herbie Hancock, Jim Jarmusch, Metro, Jimmy Page, Pete Townshend, Lasalle, Facebook Twitter, Townshend


The Original ‘Rocky III’ Idea Had the Italian Stallion Hanging Out with the Pope

Rocky III saw Sylvester Stallone‘s persistent pugilist stepping into the ring to battle Mr. T, but according to Stallone, there was an even crazier idea for the film at first. In an old interview, Stallone revealed his original Rocky III idea had a half-blind Rocky Balboa duking it out in Roman Coliseum, with the Pope himself in the audience. It’s hard to believe now, with Creed II about to punch its way into theaters, but at one point, Sylvester Stallone wanted Rocky III to be the final adv...
Tags: Movies, Sports, Roger Ebert, Sequels, Pope, Sylvester-Stallone, Creed, Michael B Jordan, Stallone, Rocky, St Peter, Rocky Balboa, Clubber Lang, Adonis Creed, Roman Coliseum, Mickey Burgess Meredith


Spielberg, Scorsese, Nolan and More Are Trying to Save FilmStruck

The saga to save FilmStruck has taken an interesting turn. In the wake of a popular petition hoping to save the soon-to-close streaming service, a huge list of big names in the movie biz have banded together to plead with Warner Media Group and change the minds of the powers that be. Steven Spielberg, Martin Scorsese, Paul Thomas Anderson, Christopher Nolan, Rian Johnson, Christopher McQuarrie, Karyn Kusama, and many, many more have thrown their considerable weight behind FilmStruck. Will this ...
Tags: Hollywood, Movies, Time, Roger Ebert, Steven-Spielberg, Rian Johnson, Turner, Edgar Wright, Martin-Scorsese, Steven, Marty, Emmerich, Karyn Kusama, Christopher McQuarrie, Warner Media, Toby Emmerich


The United States of Guns

Like many of you, I read the news of a single person killing at least 12 people in Thousand Oaks, California last night. While this is an outrageous and horrifying event, it isn’t surprising or shocking in any way in a country where more than 33,000 people die from gun violence each year. America is a stuck in a Groundhog Day loop of gun violence. We’ll keep waking up, stuck in the same reality of oppression, carnage, and ruined lives until we can figure out how to effect meaningful change. I’v...
Tags: Japan, Australia, US, America, Cnn, United States, Roger Ebert, University Of Chicago, Yemen, Adolf Hitler, Sandy Hook, Sandy Hook Elementary School, Jason Kottke, Nbc Nightly News, Dan Hodges, Columbine


A Non-Horror Fan Watches ‘Halloween’ and ‘Suspiria’ for the First Time in 2018

At some point in early October, I stopped by Facebook and the top post in my feed was from ScreenCrush’s Matt Singer, wherein he asked what the reader’s biggest cinematic blind spot was. My initial answer has been my go-to for a long time: Gone with the Wind. (I own a copy of the Blu-ray, and I still haven’t seen it. I have no excuses.) But as I thought more, remembering what time of year it was, I realized that I had two other answers: Halloween and Suspiria. A local colleague of mine had t...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Halloween, Movies, Horror, Features, Green, Roger Ebert, Smith, Alfred Hitchcock, Jamie Lee Curtis, Remakes, Michael, First Time, John Carpenter, Tom


5 Horror Movies Based On Books With Different Titles

5 Horror Movies Based On Books With Different Titles Movie titles matter. Just because a film is adapted from a work of literature doesn’t mean it gets to keep its title.  Nothing Lasts Forever just doesn’t pack the same action-blockbuster title punch as Die Hard, but b oth Roderick Thorp’s 1979 novel and its 1988 film adaptation tell the story of off-duty NYPD officer John McClane who thwarts the diabolical plans of German terrorist Hans Gruber in a Los Angeles skyscraper on Christmas Eve...
Tags: Hollywood, Movies, Stephen King, Los Angeles, Roger Ebert, King, Henry James, Clive Barker, Bruce Willis, John Carpenter, Frank, Carpenter, John McClane, Hans Gruber, Gerald, Sabrina


The Best Coming-Of-Age Movies

Growing up is hard to do. Before "adulting" — that is, clumsily impersonating our role models and pretending we have our lives together — became a buzzword, we "came of age." The action is still the same: staying out too late and trying to "find ourselves," or building a new life in a strange city.The best thing about coming-of-age movies is that you can watch them and get a better understanding of yourself today. The awkwardness of getting older is more than acne and puberty, and more than the...
Tags: Fashion, Music, Florida, Julianne Moore, California, Sacramento, America, Los Angeles, Turkey, David, Brooklyn, Ireland, Roger Ebert, Bud, New York Times, Paris


Revisiting ‘What Lies Beneath’, Robert Zemeckis’ Forgotten Alfred Hitchock Riff

What Lies Beneath is a film I really didn’t like when I saw it upon its release in 2000. As a fan of Robert Zemeckis, I was looking forward to him taking on a Hitchcockian thriller with a cast top-lined by Harrison Ford and Michelle Pfeiffer. And when I left the theatre that first time, I wholly rejected it. The supernatural elements of the film turned me off, feeling like a complete betrayal of the human monsters of Alfred Hitchcock’s oeuvre. I went in expecting one thing, got another, and l...
Tags: Movies, Horror, Cary Grant, Features, Roger Ebert, Thriller, Guillermo Del Toro, Harrison Ford, Robert-Zemeckis, Norman, Alfred Hitchcock, Janet Leigh, Claire, Jimmy Stewart, Zemeckis, Hitchcock


7 most important horror movies: Double-feature edition

This scareful season, make sure to check these seven important horror movies off your to-do list.Already an aficionado of fear? The list offers a double-feature option to pair with each classic horror flick.With apologies to Hereditary, but I haven't seen it yet.It's October! That time of year when we are duty bound to indulge in horror movies till we can't sleep with the closet door ajar. If you're looking to indulge your horror habit, we've collected seven of the most important horror movies t...
Tags: Art, Halloween, Science Fiction, Death, Movies, Jack Nicholson, Entertainment, Film, Evil, Roger Ebert, Innovation, Storytelling, Antarctica, Fear, Stanley Kubrick, Catholic


The Meaning Behind Bradley Cooper & Lady Gaga's Hair In A Star Is Born

In a 1976 review of the second remake of A Star Is Born, starring Kris Kristofferson and Barbra Streisand, film critic Roger Ebert wrote, "There's just no way, after all the times we've seen Streisand... for us to accept her as a kid on the way up." Ebert goes on, detailing exactly how despite the plot, movie makeup, and a lineage of two other eponymous films that came before it, the audience just couldn't possibly buy Streisand — an Academy Award winner — as a struggling singer. While some may...
Tags: Fashion, Music, Roger Ebert, Maine, Bradley Cooper, Lady Gaga, Paul Mitchell, Jackson, Gaga, Cooper, Kris Kristofferson, Ebert, Warner Bros Pictures, Kiehl, Marula Oil, Jackson Maine


‘Roma’ Review: Alfonso Cuarón Has Made a Masterpiece of Humanity and Empathy [TIFF]

Alfonso Cuarón‘s Roma is a singular achievement – a visually resplendent tale of empathy, focusing on a housekeeper in 1970s Mexico, and the family she works and lives with. “The movies are like a machine that generates empathy,” wrote Roger Ebert, and that description is more than apt for Roma, Alfonso Cuarón’s new masterpiece. The most personal film yet from the director of Gravity and Children of Men, Roma has Cuarón drawing on his own childhood to tell the tale of a family in 1970s Mexic...
Tags: Movies, Mexico, Toronto, Netflix, Canada, Roger Ebert, Alfonso Cuarón, Roma, Sofia, Cleo, Antonio, Cuaron, Fermin, Aparicio, Cleo Yalitza Aparicio, Sofia Marina de Tavira


CS Interview: Michael Gingold on 80’s Horror Book Ad Nauseam

CS Interview: Michael Gingold on His Horror Movie Book Ad Nauseam You may know Michael Gingold as the former Editor-in-Chief of Fangoria, as well as his current status as east coast editor for Rue Morgue, and contributor to many fine books on the genre. Before he was one of the foremost horror aficionados of our time, Gingold wrote and self-published the horror review fanzine Scareaphanalia, and throughout the 1980’s kept a shockingly thorough collection of newspaper clippings of horror ads. ...
Tags: New York, Movies, Australia, Horror, Brooklyn, Roger Ebert, Xerox, Warner Bros, Upper West Side, Colony, John Carpenter, Times Square, Blu, Rose, Kim Jong, Ebert


New Blu-ray Releases: ‘Deadpool 2’, ‘Hereditary’, ‘The Tree of Life’, ‘Upgrade’, ‘The Terror’

(Welcome to Not Dead Yet, a feature dedicated to new Blu-ray releases and what special features you should be excited about. Because yes, some of us still like to own physical copies of our movies.) Greeting, physical media phiends. This week’s Blu-ray column rounds up some of the must-have titles available to buy right now (or very soon). There’s the surprisingly funny Deadpool 2, Criterion’s fantastic The Tree of Life Blu-ray, A24’s terrifying Hereditary, Leigh Whannell‘s awesome sci-fi horro...
Tags: Christopher Nolan, Jessica Chastain, Television, Movies, Drama, Horror, Amc, Sci-fi, Upgrade, Features, Roger Ebert, Sequels, Ethan Hawke, Josh Brolin, Brad Pitt, Annie


Sunday Support Group: When to Not Persist?

- We'd sell out, if only we knew how. —Jerry Garcia As you may know, I've been trying to write a thriller, which is specific kind of genre novel with its own forms and rules. Thrillers are much more popular, and sell better, than so-called "literary" novels (or, as they used to be called back when they were novel, "novels"). I've got to be honest: things aren't going well. I heard a story about Michael Crichton, the late book author who wrote a string of bestsellers including The Andromeda...
Tags: Photography, Roger Ebert, Michael Crichton, Michael Johnston, Michael C Johnston, Irving Penn, Amazon US, Jerry Garcia, James Herriot, Arthur Penn, Amazon Canada, Herriot, Amazon UKAmazon Germany, Sunday Support Group, Thomas Berger, Mike Cf Jack London