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Southern California leaders mourn Ruth Bader Ginsburg

Tributes poured in late Friday, Sept. 18, upon word that U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg lost her battle with cancer, with Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti and county Supervisor Janice Hahn among those hailing her as a legal pioneer who fought for women’s rights and gender equality for decades. “This is a tragedy for all those who believe in our Constitution, who believe in equality and who believe our daughters can grow up to whatever they want to be,” Garcetti said on Twitter. “T...
Tags: News, Supreme Court, California, Washington, Government, Senate, America, Los Angeles, Sport, Soccer, Brooklyn, United States, Obituaries, Bill Clinton, Courts, Obituary


Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, feminist pioneer and progressive icon, dies at 87

Ruth Bader Ginsburg, a trailblazer who fought for gender equality as a lawyer and became a beloved hero of the progressive movement as a justice, died on Friday of complications from pancreatic cancer. When she was confirmed to the Supreme Court in 1993, Ginsburg was a reserved and relatively unknown court of appeals judge, but during the course of her 27 years on the court she became an improbable pop-culture icon, inspiring everything from an Oscar-nominated documentary film to her own action ...
Tags: New York, Texas, Featured, Sweden, Supreme Court, Law, Obama, Congress, Washington, Senate, White House, Virginia, Russia, Court, Alabama, America


Smart drug delivery system may help treat spinal cord injuries, neurological disorders

A Rutgers-led team has created a smart drug delivery system that reduces inflammation in damaged nervous tissues and may help treat spinal cord injuries and other neurological disorders.
Tags: Health, Rutgers


Study finds increased risk of serious complications in children taking oral steroids

Children who take oral steroids to treat asthma or autoimmune diseases have an increased risk of diabetes, high blood pressure, and blood clots, according to Rutgers researchers.
Tags: Health, Rutgers


Children who take steroids at increased risk for diabetes, high blood pressure, blood clots

Children who take oral steroids to treat asthma or autoimmune diseases have an increased risk of diabetes, high blood pressure, and blood clots, according to Rutgers researchers. The Rutgers study is the first to quantify these complications of oral steroids in a nationwide population of children.
Tags: Science, Rutgers


New smart drug delivery system may help treatment for neurological disorders

A Rutgers-led team has created a smart drug delivery system that reduces inflammation in damaged nervous tissues and may help treat spinal cord injuries and other neurological disorders. The system, which uses extremely thin biomaterials implanted in the body, also protects nerve fibers (axons) that connect nerve cells in injured neural tissues, according to a study in the journal Advanced Materials.
Tags: Science, Rutgers


Apple's pushing deeper into healthcare

Welcome to Business Insider's daily healthcare newsletter, your daily dose of pharma, biotech, and healthcare news. Subscribe here to get this newsletter in your inbox every weekday. Hollis Johnson/Business Insider Hello,Today in healthcare news: What Apple's new products tell us about its healthcare ambitions, Pfizer's execs are feeling confident on vaccine data by the end of October, and an inside look at a men's health startup that's become a key testing player. Plus: We just got some...
Tags: Apple, Spacex, US, Trends, Bill Gates, Tim Cook, Nba, Fda, Apple Watch, Pfizer, Apple Inc, Trump, Vault, Rutgers, Rutgers University, HHS


Ocean algae get 'coup de grace' from viruses

Scientists have long believed that ocean viruses always quickly kill algae, but Rutgers-led research shows they live in harmony with algae and viruses provide a 'coup de grace' only when blooms of algae are already stressed and dying. The study will likely change how scientists view viral infections of algae, also known as phytoplankton - especially the impact of viruses on ecosystem processes like algal bloom formation (and decline) and the cycling of carbon and other chemicals on Earth.
Tags: Science, Rutgers


Glass tables can cause life-threatening injuries

Faulty glass in tables can cause life-threatening injuries, according to a Rutgers study, which provides evidence that stricter federal regulations are needed to protect consumers.
Tags: Science, Rutgers


As domestic violence spikes, many victims and their children have nowhere to live

COVID-19 has left many victims of domestic violence facing difficulties feeding their children and accessing services for safe housing, transportation and childcare once they leave shelters, according to a Rutgers study published in the journal Violence Against Women.
Tags: Science, Rutgers


Gestational diabetes may have long-term effects on epigenetic aging in offspring

Children born to mothers who had diabetes during pregnancy may age faster biologically and be at an increased risk for obesity and high blood pressure, according to Rutgers researchers.
Tags: Health, Rutgers


Gestational diabetes may accelerate child's biological age

Children born to mothers who had diabetes during pregnancy may age faster biologically and be at an increased risk for obesity and high blood pressure, according to Rutgers researchers.
Tags: Science, Rutgers


Ticks associated with bats reported for the first time in New Jersey

A tick species associated with bats has been reported for the first time in New Jersey and could pose health risks to people, pets and livestock, according to a Rutgers-led study in the Journal of Medical Entomology.
Tags: Health, New Jersey, Rutgers


Smoking linked to frequent substance use and poor mental health in sexual minority population

Cigarette smoking is associated with frequent substance use and poor behavioral and physical health in sexual and gender minority populations, according to Rutgers researchers.
Tags: Health, Rutgers


Sexual minority men who smoke report worse mental health and more frequent substance use

Cigarette smoking is associated with frequent substance use and poor behavioral and physical health in sexual and gender minority populations, according to Rutgers researchers. The study, published in the journal Annals of Behavioral Medicine, examined tobacco use by sexual minority men and transgender women to better understand the relationships between smoking, substance use and mental, psychosocial and general health.
Tags: Science, Rutgers, Annals of Behavioral Medicine


Rutgers-led national survey uncovers doctors' misconceptions about nicotine risks

Most doctors misperceive the risks of nicotine, the addictive chemical in tobacco products, according to a Rutgers-led national survey.
Tags: Science, Rutgers


Bat tick found for the first time in New Jersey

A tick species associated with bats has been reported for the first time in New Jersey and could pose health risks to people, pets and livestock, according to a Rutgers-led study in the Journal of Medical Entomology. This species (Carios kelleyi) is a "soft" tick. Deer ticks, which carry Lyme disease, are an example of "hard" ticks.
Tags: Science, New Jersey, Rutgers


Land development in New Jersey continues to slow

Land development in New Jersey has slowed dramatically since the 2008 Great Recession, but it's unclear how the COVID-19 pandemic and efforts to fight societal and housing inequality will affect future trends, according to a Rutgers co-authored report.
Tags: Science, New Jersey, Rutgers


Jacques Cousteau's grandson wants to build the world's largest underwater research station in the Caribbean — take a look

Fabien Cousteau's PROTEUS. Concept designs by Yves Béhar and fuseproject. The Fabian Cousteau Ocean Learning Center is creating an advanced underwater research station. Proteus will have freezers, microscopes, and a video studio for research and education.  It will be located off the coast of Curacao, an island in the Caribbean.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Fabian Cousteau, grandson of famed oceanographer and documentary maker Jacques Cousteau, has an ambitious ...
Tags: Florida, Science, Climate Change, Trends, Tech, Research, Features, Yves Behar, Ocean, Stephen, Caribbean, Curacao, Rising Sea Levels, Rutgers, Caribbean Sea, Jacques Cousteau


'Wrong-way' migrations stop shellfish from escaping ocean warming

Ocean warming is paradoxically driving bottom-dwelling invertebrates -- including sea scallops, blue mussels, surfclams and quahogs that are valuable to the shellfish industry -- into warmer waters and threatening their survival, a Rutgers-led study shows.
Tags: Science, Rutgers


Flower delivery companies have emerged as unlikely winners of the pandemic as Americans send blooms to ease stress and connect over canceled celebrations

Americans are sending each other flowers because they can't get together. AP Photo/Seth Wenig Flower delivery companies are booming during the coronavirus pandemic. On Thursday, 1-800-Flowers reported record revenues and profit growth in its most recent quarter.Sending flowers gives consumers a chance to connect with family and loved ones as they miss out on their usual gatherings because of social distancing, experts say.Research has also pointed to flowers' ability to reduce stress. V...
Tags: US, Trends, Harvard, Rutgers, Butler, Society of American Florists, Katie Butler, BloomNation, Weisstein, Madeline Stone, Christopher McCann, AP Photo Seth Wenig Flower, Gregg Weisstein


Why your rapport with coworkers is about much more than small talk

A recent Rutgers study has found that although small talk in the office can be distracting, employees and employers alike gain far more from these seemingly trivial interactions than we lose.Non-work banter can lead to more cohesive culture and higher-quality output.To deliver output with a higher value, you need to view productivity through a different lens, one that has leeway for freeform discourse.As remote working has become an integral part of the "new normal," there has been plenty of spe...
Tags: Work, Productivity, Japan, Communication, Mit, Culture, Innovation, Collaboration, Ibm, Johnson, Rutgers, Ryan Holmes, Steven Johnson, William Hogarth, Matthew Guay, Department of Human Resource Management


Novel device rapidly measures trace levels of toxic lead in sediments

Rutgers researchers have created a miniature device for measuring trace levels of toxic lead in sediments at the bottom of harbors, rivers and other waterways within minutes - far faster than currently available laboratory-based tests, which take days.
Tags: Health, Rutgers


Link found between frequent seizures during menstrual cycle and drug-resistant epilepsy

More frequent seizures during the menstrual cycle in women with genetic generalized epilepsy have been linked for the first time to drug-resistant epilepsy, when anti-seizure medications don't work, according to a Rutgers coauthored study that may help lead to tailored treatments.
Tags: Health, Rutgers


Seizures during menstrual cycle linked to drug-resistant epilepsy

More frequent seizures during the menstrual cycle in women with genetic generalized epilepsy have been linked for the first time to drug-resistant epilepsy, when anti-seizure medications don't work, according to a Rutgers coauthored study that may help lead to tailored treatments.
Tags: Science, Rutgers


New device can measure toxic lead within minutes

Rutgers researchers have created a miniature device for measuring trace levels of toxic lead in sediments at the bottom of harbors, rivers and other waterways within minutes -- far faster than currently available laboratory-based tests, which take days. The affordable lab-on-a-chip device could also allow municipalities, water companies, universities, K-12 schools, daycares and homeowners to easily and swiftly test their water supplies. The research is published in the IEEE Sensors Journal.
Tags: Science, Rutgers


Studies identify a more rapid method to decontaminate N95 masks

Two Rutgers-led studies have identified a more rapid method to decontaminate N95 masks using vaporized hydrogen peroxide – making reuse of masks more economically feasible and practical for health care workers on the frontlines against COVID-19.
Tags: Health, Rutgers


Study shows possibility to predict who would benefit from exercise and behavioral therapy

Aerobic exercise clearly benefits young adults with major depression, and a Rutgers-led study suggests it may be possible to predict those who would benefit from behavioral therapy with exercise.
Tags: Health, Rutgers


Who Could Benefit From Exercise and Behavioral Treatment?

Aerobic exercise clearly benefits young adults with major depression, and a Rutgers-led study suggests it may be possible to predict those who would benefit from behavioral therapy with exercise. Unique to this precision medicine study, published in the journal Psychological Medicine, is an assessment of cognitive control and reward-related brain activity, two facets of brain function that are impaired in people with depression.
Tags: Science, Rutgers


Young gay men's health care needs not being met

Young gay men who are uncomfortable discussing sexual issues with their primary care providers and experience health care discrimination are less likely to seek coordinated care, leading to missed opportunities for early diagnosis of chronic and mental health issues, according to Rutgers researchers.
Tags: Science, Rutgers