Posts filtered by tags: Scholarship[x]


 

Believing in "meritocracy" makes you act like a dick

The term "meritocracy" was popularized in the UK sociologist Michael Young's 1958 novel, "The Rise of the Meritocracy," in which aristocrats insist that they are the natural rulers of their society based on "objective" measures of worth ("merit" + "aristocracy" = "meritocracy") that are obviously tilted to favor them, a fact that they are conveniently blind to. But satire has a way of being overtaken by doctrine, and today, a majority of Americans believe that they live in a meritocracy wh...
Tags: Post, Business, UK, News, Scholarship, Indiana University, Oligarchs, Massachusetts Institute Of Technology, Michael Young, Meritocracy, Benard, Meritocratic Delusion, Emilio Castilla, Stephen Benard, Yet Castilla, Delusions With Business Models


First Apex Legends esports scholarship takes you from filthy casual to pro

Massachusetts-based Becker College is the first college in the nation to offer a scholarship for Apex Legends. The path-to-pro program gives players $5,000 upon admittance to the school. The post First Apex Legends esports scholarship takes you from filthy casual to pro appeared first on Digital Trends.
Tags: Gaming, News, College, Massachusetts, Trends, Scholarship, Esports, Becker, Becker College, Apex Legends


Acoustic meta-material: a shape that reflects sound but passes light and air

A Boston University team have developed an acoustic, 3D-printed metamaterial whose topology is such that it reflects 94% of human-audible sound; the researchers' demonstration involves inserting a ring of this stuff in a PVC pipe and blasting a speaker down one end: light and air emerges from the other end, but sound does not. The metamaterial is in contrast to traditional acoustic insulation materials, which absorb sound and convert it to heat energy; this material actualy reflects the sou...
Tags: Post, Happy Mutants, Science, News, 3d Printing, Scholarship, Mark Wilson, Fast Company, Material Science, Topology, Boston University, Zhang, Fano, Ghaffarivardavagh, Xin Zhang Phys Rev, Boston University Eurekalert


A critical flaw in Switzerland's e-voting system is a microcosm of everything wrong with e-voting, security practice, and auditing firms

Switzerland is about to have a national election with electronic voting, overseen by Swiss Post; e-voting is a terrible idea and the general consensus among security experts who don't work for e-voting vendors is that it shouldn't be attempted, but if you put out an RFP for magic beans, someone will always show up to sell you magic beans, whether or not magic beans exist. Swiss Post contracted with Barcelona firm Scytl to build the system, then consulted with outside security experts and KP...
Tags: Post, Usa, Elections, UK, News, W3c, Censorship, Barcelona, Green, Scholarship, Switzerland, Crypto, Dmca, Kpmg, Carillion, Apollo


A machine-learning system that guesses whether text was produced by machine-learning systems

Gltr is an MIT-IBM Watson Lab/Harvard NLP joint project that analyzes texts and predicts whether that text was generated by a machine-learning model. Automatically produced texts use language models derived from statistical analysis of vast corpuses of human-generated text to produce machine-generated texts that can be very hard for a human to distinguish from text produced by another human. These models could help malicious actors in many ways, including generating convincing spam, reviews...
Tags: Post, News, Mit, Scholarship, Machine Learning, Watson, Ai, Computer Science, GPT, ML, Tooltips, Centaurs, Anonymouth 2.0, Set A Thief To Catch A Thief, MIT IBM Watson Lab Harvard NLP, Gltr


Towards a general theory of "adversarial examples," the bizarre, hallucinatory motes in machine learning's all-seeing eye

For several years, I've been covering the bizarre phenomenon of "adversarial examples (AKA "adversarial preturbations"), these being often tiny changes to data than can cause machine-learning classifiers to totally misfire: imperceptible squeaks that make speech-to-text systems hallucinate phantom voices; or tiny shifts to a 3D image of a helicopter that makes image-classifiers hallucinate a rifle A friend of mine who is a very senior cryptographer of longstanding esteem in the field rece...
Tags: Google, Security, Post, News, Harvard, Infosec, Scholarship, Ai, Computer Science, Princeton, MIT Media Lab, Jonathan Zittrain, Joi Ito, ML, Labsix, Adversarial Examples


Massive study finds strong correlation between "early affluence" and "faster cognitive drop" in old age

A paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science reports on new analysis of the Survey of Health, Aging, and Retirement in Europe (SHARE), which tracks outcomes for 24,066 people aged 50-96 with a good balance of genders (56% female), and reports a strong correlation between "early affluence" and "faster cognitive drop" in "verbal fluency" (measured with an animal naming challenge). SHARE is the largest study of its kind, with more than double the subjects of similar proj...
Tags: Europe, Post, Science, News, Aging, Eu, Scholarship, Share, Class War, Inequality, National Academy of Science, Verbal Fluency, Stéphane Cullati PNAS, Judy George Medpagetoday


German neofascists used Qanon to expand their reach

Germany's Alternative For Germany (AfD) party (previously) are an insurgent neofascist movement with ties to senior mainstream politicians and the country's super-wealthy would-be oligarchs; the party put on a hard push in the the 2018 Bavarian elections and their meme warfare was full of familiar voter-suppression tactics, from garden-variety disinformation to exhortations to stay home on election day. Also prominent in the group's messaging: hashtags and tropes from the US far-right consp...
Tags: Europe, Post, UK, News, Germany, US, America, Canada, Scholarship, Trump, AFD, Gallagher, Erin Gallagher, Chemnitz, Precarity, QAnon


Scientists finally explain why microwaved grapes emit glorious bursts of plasma

The mystery of the glorious fireball emitted by microwaved grapes (featured in my novel Little Brother) has been resolved, thanks to a paper in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in which Trent University researchers Hamza Khattak and Aaron Slepkov explain how they destroyed a dozen microwaves before figuring out that the grapes were just the right size and had enough humidity to set up standing waves that amplify the microwaves -- and anything roughly grape-sized will do the s...
Tags: Food, Post, Science, News, Not Food, Scholarship, Montreal, PNAS, National Academy of Sciences, Ars, Concordia University, Sci Hub, Trent University, Standing Waves, Hamza Khattak, Aaron Slepkov


Study suggests that Flat Eartherism spread via Youtube

The rise in a belief that the Earth is flat is bizarre and somewhat frightening, a repudiation of one of the most basic elements of scientific consensus. Texas Tech University psych researcher Asheley R. Landrum attended a 2017 flat earth convention and interviewed 30 attendees to trace the origins of their belief in a flat earth, finding that Youtube videos were key to their journey into conspiracy theories; her findings were bolstered by a survey of more than 500 participants. Landrum pre...
Tags: Post, Science, News, US, Earth, Scholarship, Neil Degrasse Tyson, Conspiracy Theories, Ross, Sargent, Texas Tech University, Denialism, Carrie, AAAS, Landrum, Mark Sargent


Despite public pledges, leading scientific journals still allow statistical misconduct and refuse to correct it

A leading form of statistical malpractice in scientific studies is to retroactively comb through the data for "interesting" patterns; while such patterns may provide useful leads for future investigations, simply cherry-picking data that looks significant out of a study that has otherwise failed to prove out the researcher's initial hypothesis can generate false -- but plausible-seeming -- conclusions. To combat this practice, many journals have signed up to the Consolidated Standards of ...
Tags: Post, News, Stats, Scholarship, Ben Goldacre, Lancet, JAMA, Goldacre, P-hacking, Quis custodiet ipsos custodes, Compare Trials, Consort, Fishing Expeditions, Juking The Stats, NEMJ, Kamal R Mahtani Biomedcentral


Even without explicit collusion, pricing algorithms converge on price-fixing strategies

Literally the only kind of monopolistic behavior that the US government is willing to prosecute is price fixing, and that's why it's so important to read Artificial intelligence, algorithmic pricing, and collusion, a paper by four Italian economists from the University of Bologna who document how price-fixing is an emergent property of pricing algorithms -- the systems online merchants use to price-match with their competitors. The researchers find that "even relatively simple pricing algo...
Tags: Post, News, US, Scholarship, Antitrust, Machine Learning, Ai, Computer Science, Botwars, University of Bologna, David Grossman, Monopolism, Algorithmic Pricing, Consumer Harm


Most adults are incapable of understanding most online terms of service

A new paper by a business professor and a contract law professor evaluated the terms and conditions of 500 leading websites and found that the 99% of them required at least 14 years of education to truly comprehend, far more than the majority of US adults have attained. US courts have held that clickthrough contracts are enforceable whether or not they have been read before clicking "I Agree," but the authors propose that courts should consider whether these contracts could be read and unde...
Tags: Post, News, US, Scholarship, Flesch Kincaid, Fine Print, Eulas, Grifters, Reasonable Agreements, Flesch Reading Ease, Grifter Capitalism, Click Here To Agree, Facebook Amazon Uber, Uri Benoliel, Shmuel I Becher, Dustin Patar Motherboard


Study shows that countries that permit Facebook's beloved "zero rating" programs end up with more expensive wireless data

Facebook loves "zero rating," when an internet provider takes bribes from online services to exempt them from data charges on their networks: Facebook says that having a roster of (Facebook-approved) services that are free-to-use benefits the poorest people in a country (and the fact that this also makes "Facebook" synonymous with "internet" for whole nations is merely incidental). But reality has a well-known anti-Facebook bias, which is why all the studies done on the supposed benefits o...
Tags: Mobile, Facebook, Post, News, Cable Company Fuckery, Fcc, Net Neutrality, Congress, California, India, US, Eu, Competition, Scholarship, Eff, Poor Internet For Poor People


USCCA Announces Linda Harris Memorial Scholarship

In a touching act of remembrance, US Concealed Carry announced late this January that they were establishing the Linda Harris Memorial Scholarship. Linda passed away at age 68 on September 1st of last year. Linda Harris The wife of George Harris, co-founder of the SIG Academy, Linda was a lifelong shooter. She was the first […] Read More … The post USCCA Announces Linda Harris Memorial Scholarship appeared first on The Firearm Blog.
Tags: News, Guns, US, Training, Scholarship, Memorial, Daily News, Linda, USCCA, George Harris, Concealed Carry, Linda Harris


Juul's strategy for success: target children, steadily ramp up nicotine levels

Juul -- now a subsidiary of the company that owns Marlboro -- attained its $12.8B valuation by growing faster than any other vaping company, thanks in large part to the children who bought its products, reversing decades of progress in getting teens off nicotine products while simultaneously monopolizing the market for vaping products Juul's other secret to success was to steadily ramp up the levels of deadly, highly addictive nicotine in its products, being the first to leap from 1-2% nico...
Tags: Post, Business, UK, News, Smoking, Stanford, Israel, United States, Scholarship, Vaping, Marlboro, Juul, BMJ Tobacco Control, Late Stage Capitalism, Stanford Research, Michael Nedelman


Archaeological evidence for the Iron Age practice of embalming your enemies' severed heads with resin and displaying them

Ancient Roman texts and sculptures describe a Celtic practice of severing your defeated enemies' heads, embalming them with resin and plant oils, and displaying them as war trophies: now, archaeologists have unearthed evidence of the practice at Le Cailar, the 2,500 year old walled city near the Rhone. The archaeologists have identified fragments of 100 or more skulls dating from 300 to 320BCE, bearing markings indicative of decapitation and embalming. The bones were found alongside coins, ...
Tags: Post, News, France, Scholarship, Archaeology, University Of Chicago, Rhone, Strabo, Skulls, Diodorus, Le Cailar, Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia, Réjane Roure, University Paul Valéry Montpellier, Martin Doppelt, Réjane Roureb Journal of Archaeological Science


Conducting "evil" computer research, in the name of good

The next CHI (computer-human interaction) conference is being held on May 5 in Glasgow, and will include a workshop called CHI4Evil, "Creative Speculation on the Negative Effects of HCI Research," in which scholars, researchers and practitioners are invited to "anticipate and reflect on the potential downsides of our technology design, research, and implementation" through design fiction, speculative design, and other tools. The call for papers asks submitters to "articulate a negative use ...
Tags: Post, News, Scotland, Ui, Scholarship, Glasgow, Ux, Design Fiction, Hci, Chi, Giuseppe Milo, Chi4evil, Inoculation Via Dystopia, HCI Research


The Silent Key Scholarship Fund

Roger, W8ZRF, SK Over the span of less than a year, ARROW, our amateur radio club, has lost two of its long-time members: Clay, W8JNZ, and Roger, W8ZRF. Clay passed in December 2017, Roger in October 2018. These guys headed up our first VE team, were great hams, and great human beings. When Clay died, I got it into my head that I wanted to start a scholarship in his name. He was always ready to help young people get started in the hobby. I contacted the local community college and got in touch ...
Tags: Radio, Scholarship, Clay, Roger, Public Service, DTE, Everything Else, W8jnz, W8ZRF, Roger W8ZRF Clay


Rethinking Capitalism: like the Feynman lectures but for economics

From 1961-1963 Richard Feynman -- one of the preeminent physicsts of his day -- taught an undergraduate class in physics at Cal Tech, a gig that was nominally well below his paygrade, and gave such a virtuoso performance that "They Feynman Lectures" have gone down in the annals of physics history as some of the best introductory material on physics in existence. Mariana Mazzucato is one of the leading market-sceptic economists of our age, whose instant-classic 2013 book The Entrepreneurial ...
Tags: Video, News, Economics, Scholarship, Feynman, Richard Feynman, University College London, Cal Tech, Mariana Mazzucato, Mazzucato, Rethinking Capitalism, The Entrepreneurial State, Institute for Innovation and Public Purpose IIPP, IIPP


Embodied logic: Using stimuli-responsive materials and geometric principles to create smart objects

A new paper in Nature describes the US-Army-funded research of U Penn materials scientists to create a new generation of 3D printed "smart objects" whose geometry and materials enable them to interact with their environments without having to use embedded computers, sensors or actuators. The researchers are combining two techniques here: the first is the geometric technique of creating bistable structures that can hold either of two configurations indefinitely and can freely shift from one ...
Tags: Post, Science, News, Engineering, 3d Printing, Scholarship, US Army, Geometry, Penn, Materials Science, Jiang, New Materials, Smart Objects, Embodied Logic, Yijie Jiang Lucia, Korpas Jordan R Raney Nature


Visual Disturbances: what eye-tracking and 187 unlicensed clips reveal about change blindness and our perception of films

My most recent essay film, Visual Disturbances, premiered in the open access journal [in]Transition yesterday. This open access journal features peer reviewed academic video essays and showcases a wide variety of film and media analysis. Visual Disturbances uses some cutting-edge eye tracking visualizations to explore how film audiences both perceive and mis-perceive movies. A few readers may remember my 2007 Disney mashup, A Fair(y) Use Tale. That film, in its own small way, helped op...
Tags: Psychology, Videos, Happy Mutants, Video, Hollywood, News, Scholarship, UC Irvine, Dan Simons, Bucknell, Tati, Jacques Tati, Nathan Ryan, Film Studies, Taylor Myers, Jack Lerner


Regardless of political affiliation, over-65s are most likely to share "fake news" (and there's not much fake news, and it's largely right-wing)

A peer-reviewed study conducted by a trio of Princeton and NYU political scientists and published in Science Advances systematically examined the proliferation of fake news in the 2016 election cycle and found that, contrary to earlier reports, disinformation did not get shared very widely, and that most of it was right-wing, and that the people who shared disinformation of all political orientation were over 65. Users over 65 were seven times more likely to share hoaxes than users aged 18-...
Tags: Facebook, Post, News, Scholarship, Princeton, Nyu, Casey Newton, Demographics Are Destiny, Political Science, Fake News, Disinformation, Reality Has A Well-known Left-wing Bias, DeleteFacebook, Jonathan Nagler, Joshua Tucker, Incompetent Russian Bots


Ten years after Juneau ditched water fluoridation, kids racked up an average of $300/each in extra dental bills

It's been ten years since the people of Juneau, Alaska succumbed to conspiracy theories and voted to ruin their kids' teeth by removing fluoride from the drinking water, and it shows. A BMC Oral Health study by Jennifer Meyer (U Alaska), Vasileios Margaritis (Walden U) and Aaron Mendelsohn (Walden U) found that, on average, the families of unfluoridated kids of Juneau paid an extra $300 to have preventable cavities drilled and filled. Fluoride costs pennies. Those figures are based on ...
Tags: Post, Kids, News, Parenting, Public Health, Alaska, Scholarship, Conspiracy Theories, Dentistry, Juneau, Juneau Alaska, Jennifer Meyer, Visit The Sins Of The Fathers, Alaska Vasileios Margaritis Walden U, Aaron Mendelsohn Walden


More videos from our University of Chicago interdisciplinary seminar series: "Censorship and Information Control"

Between September and December, I collaborated with science fiction writer and Renaissance historian Ada Palmer and science historian Adrian Johns on a series of interdisciplinary seminars on "Censorship and Information Control" with a rotating crew of academics and practitioners from several fields. Thanks to generous Kickstarter backers, we were able to pay for professional videography and ADA-compliant subtitling for the whole series, and there are now five of the seminars online for you...
Tags: Videos, Happy Mutants, Science Fiction, Video, UK, News, Youtube, History, Kickstarter, Scholarship, University Of Chicago, Ada, Ada Palmer, Adrian Johns, Censorship and Information Control, Information Control


Regulating Airbnb drives down local rents (as well as house prices)

Airbnb has led to much of the rental housing stock in some of the world's most expensive cities being turned into unlicensed hotel rooms, driving up both rents and house prices even further. Opponents of regulatory approaches to fix this often say that Airbnb's contribution to inflation in housing costs and values is negligible, and/or that any benefits from curbs on Airbnb would be canceled by other forces that are driving up housing costs. But LA County provides a natural lab for evaluat...
Tags: Post, Business, News, Los Angeles, Economics, Scholarship, Airbnb, Urban Theory, LA County, Weaponized Shelter, The Rent's Too Damned High, HSO, Hans Koster Jos van Ommeren, Nicolas Volhausen Vox EU


Not all "screen time" is created equal

The debates about screen time and kids are really confused: the studies have contradictory findings, and the ones that find negative outcomes in kids who spend a lot of time on their screens struggle to figure out the cause-and-effect relationship (are depressed kids using screens more because that's how they get help, or do kids become depressed if they use their screen a lot?). It's obvious that not all screen time is created equal: games aren't social media, social media isn't Youtube. W...
Tags: Post, Kids, News, Parenting, Scholarship, Screen Time, Mimi, UC Irvine, Oxford Internet Institute, ABCD, Dowling, Robbie Gonzalez, Odgers, Przybylski, Causality Is Hard, Mimi Ito


Calculating Facebook's value by figuring out how much you'd have to pay users to quit

A group of academics from economics, business, and policy schools at Kenyon, MSU, Susquehanna and Tufts performed a series of ingenious experiments to determine how much typical Facebook users value the service, by getting experimental subjects to participate in sealed-bid auctions for payments in exchange for quitting the service. They found that "the average Facebook user would require more than $1000 to deactivate their account for one year." Multiply this by Facebook's user-base, and yo...
Tags: Facebook, Post, News, Economics, United States, Scholarship, Tufts, Solow, Cambridge Analytica, DeleteFacebook, Live By Metcalfe's Law Die By Metcalfe's Law, Kenyon MSU Susquehanna, Jay R Corrigan Saleem Alhabash Matthew Rousu, Sean B Cash


Costa Rica abolished its army in 1949 and thereafter enjoyed the best per-capita GDP growth in the region

In 1948, Costa Rica weathered a civil war, and in 1949, they abolished their military. Since then, Costa Rica has emerged as the Central American success story, more politically stable and richer than its neighbors. In a research paper, researchers from the Universidad de Costa Rica Observatorio de Desarrollo deploy "synthetic control estimates" to try to see how much of Costa Rica's growth can be attributed to eliminating military spending: they find that between 1950-2010, annual growth i...
Tags: Post, News, US, Economics, Scholarship, Kansas, Cia, Costa Rica, Central America, Latin America, Pura Vida, National Guard, Militarism, Dirty Wars, Dinedeco, Funde Norte


Mice given an experimental gene therapy don't get fat, regardless of caloric intake

Researchers at Flinders University knocked out a gene known as RCAN1 in mice, hypothesizing that this would increase "non-shivering thermogenesis," which "expends calories as heat rather than storing them as fat" -- the mice were fed a high-calorie diet and did not gain weight. In particular, the modified mice did not store fat around their middles -- a phenomenon associated with many health risks, including cardiac problems -- and their resting muscles burned more calories. I wrote this i...
Tags: Post, Science, News, Biology, Diet, Obesity, Scholarship, Genomics, Damien, Beverly, Flinders University, Calcineurin, Fatkins, Rcan1, Gavin Butler, Flinders University Science Daily