Posts filtered by tags: Siphiwe Sibeko[x]


 

Interpol warns that organized crime groups will likely try to steal 'liquid gold' COVID vaccines as well as peddle fake doses

Interpol warned agencies to be on high alert for fraudulent vaccines and cyber threats. Siphiwe Sibeko/Pool via AP Law enforcement agencies should be prepared for organized crime networks to try to steal COVID-19 vaccines, Interpol said in a statement Wednesday.  The organization warned that criminal groups will likely attempt to infiltrate supply chains and sell fraudulent vaccines.  The pandemic has "already triggered unprecedented opportunistic and predatory criminal behaviour," accordi...
Tags: Transportation, UK, Crime, News, Trends, Healthcare, Pfizer, Vaccines, Interpol, Jurgen, Moderna, Siphiwe Sibeko, International Criminal Police Organization, COVID-19, COVID, Paycheck Protection Program


AstraZeneca will likely retest its COVID-19 vaccine, CEO says after admitting an error in the first trial that may have skewed results

A man walking past an AstraZeneca sign in Macclesfield, England. Phil Noble/Reuters The UK pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca is likely to run a second global trial to assess its COVID-19 vaccine's efficacy, its CEO told Bloomberg News on Thursday. AstraZeneca and the University of Oxford announced Monday that preliminary results indicated their two-dose vaccine could be up to 90% effective at preventing COVID-19. But the team later said an error in the trial left some participants with...
Tags: Health, UK, Science, News, Politico, US, Trends, South Africa, Brazil, Astrazeneca, Pfizer, University of Oxford, Pascal Soriot, Bloomberg News, Moderna, Siphiwe Sibeko


AstraZeneca will likely re-test its COVID-19 vaccine, CEO says after admitting an error in the first trial that may have skewed results

A man walks past a sign at an AstraZeneca site in Macclesfield, UK. Phil Noble/Reuters UK pharmaceutical company AstraZeneca will likely run a second global trial to assess its COVID-19 vaccine's efficacy, the CEO told Bloomberg News on Thursday. AstraZeneca and the University of Oxford announced Monday that preliminary results showed their two-dose vaccine could be up to 90% effective at preventing COVID-19. But the team later admitted that there was an error in the trial, leaving some...
Tags: Health, UK, Science, News, US, Trends, Brazil, Astrazeneca, Pfizer, University of Oxford, Pascal Soriot, Bloomberg News, Soweto South Africa, Moderna, Siphiwe Sibeko, Sheila Bird


Oxford and AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine is considerably cheaper and easier to distribute than either Pfizer's or Moderna's. Here's why.

A half-dose of Oxford-AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine initially could mean we have double the number doses available when it's approved by regulators. Siphiwe Sibeko/Pool via AP The University of Oxford and AstraZeneca's COVID-19 vaccine can be stored at normal fridge temperatures for at least six months. Unlike Pfizer and BioNTech's vaccine, it therefore doesn't require an ultra-cold storage and transport system, making it cheaper to distribute globally. The price per dose is also ...
Tags: Minnesota, US, Trends, Eu, Healthcare, Oxford, Astrazeneca, Pfizer, Vaccine, University of Oxford, Oxford University, Welt am Sonntag, Andrew Pollard, Moderna, Siphiwe Sibeko, Stéphane Bancel


We're likely to need coronavirus booster shots after the initial vaccine

A volunteer receives an experimental coronavirus shot from a medical worker at Baragwanath Hospital in Soweto, South Africa, June 24, 2020. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko People may need to get booster shots after the initial coronavirus vaccine doses in order to stay protected, experts say. Other vaccines, like the tetanus shot, also require periodic boosters.  That adds further complication to the impending challenge of distributing coronavirus vaccines, which are likely to require two doses. Vi...
Tags: Health, Science, News, New York City, Trends, Pfizer, University of Oxford, Vaccines, Mount Sinai, Chicago Illinois, Soweto South Africa, Icahn School of Medicine, ORENSTEIN, Moderna, Siphiwe Sibeko, Aylin Woodward


When can I get a coronavirus vaccine?

Jakub Porzycki/NurPhoto via Getty Images Both Moderna and Pfizer have recently delivered promising news that their coronavirus vaccines are highly effective, in large, diverse human trials. But that doesn't mean you're going to be able to get a shot before the end of 2020.  In all likelihood, the first coronavirus vaccines will begin rolling out to frontline workers and vulnerable populations in the last days of 2020, or possibly early 2021. By Memorial Day in late May, it's possible that...
Tags: Science, News, Cdc, White House, US, Trends, Public Health, South Africa, New York Times, Vaccination, Fda, Pfizer, Anthony Fauci, Istanbul, Soweto, Ankara Turkey


The FDA's panel of experts said its COVID-19 vaccine approval rules aren't strict enough, and could lead to vaccines being rushed out

A volunteer receives an injection from a medical worker. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko The Food and Drug Administration's (FDA) panel of experts questioned the safety standards of the agency's COVID-19 vaccine approval at an advisory meeting Thursday. Independent experts in the FDA's vaccine advisory board said they were concerned about a vaccine being rushed out, and later proving unsafe or ineffective, per Bloomberg. The FDA requires a two-month follow-up after a final vaccine dose before emerg...
Tags: Trends, Bloomberg, Food And Drug Administration, Fda, Pfizer, Donald Trump, Gilead Sciences, Stanford University Medical Center, Siphiwe Sibeko, Diana Zuckerman, National Center for Health Research, COVID, Kate Duffy, Archana Chatterjee, Chicago Medical School, Amanda Cohn


Moderna just finished recruiting 30,000 people for its coronavirus vaccine trial. One graph reveals how the biotech slowed down its research to recruit more minorities.

A volunteer receives an injection from a medical worker during the country's first human clinical trial for a potential vaccine against the novel coronavirus, at Baragwanath Hospital in Soweto, South Africa, June 24, 2020. REUTERS/Siphiwe Sibeko The coronavirus vaccine frontrunner Moderna has finished enrolling volunteers for its final clinical trial, the biotech said Thursday.  The 30,000-person study is expected to produce data showing whether or not the vaccine prevents symptomatic ...
Tags: Health, Science, Massachusetts, US, Trends, Healthcare, Pfizer, Business Insider, Soweto South Africa, Moderna, Siphiwe Sibeko, Andrew Dunn, Stéphane Bancel, Coronavirus, Bancel, Coronavirus Vaccine


3 billion people could struggle to get a COVID-19 vaccine because the world doesn't have enough fridges to store it

A refrigerator containing vaccines seen at the Kraft Center for Community Health in Boston on January 2, 2019. Suzanne Kreiter/The Boston Globe via Getty Images Three billion people may be denied a COVID-19 vaccine when it's here because a number of countries don't have sufficient cold storage facilities, the Associated Press reported. Most vaccines need to kept at between 2 and 8 degrees Celsius, but the vaccine candidates from Moderna and Pfizer need temperatures of minus 15 and minus 70...
Tags: Science, Boston, India, Africa, Trends, Ap, News UK, Venezuela, Associated Press, Pfizer, Vaccine, University of Oxford, DHL, Usaid, Boston Globe, University of Sussex


Trump's coronavirus vaccine czar envisions '3 waves' of coronavirus vaccine data and approvals. Here's how he sees the next 6 months playing out.

Moncef Slaoui, chief advisor of Operation Warp Speed Reuters Moncef Slaoui, the chief scientist for the US government's coronavirus vaccine initiative, anticipates three waves of vaccine data and approvals coming over the next six months.  "We'll have three waves of efficacy readouts and potentially three waves of emergency use authorizations or approvals," Moncef Slaoui, the policy advisor of Operation Warp Speed, said in a phone interview with Business Insider on Tuesday. Slaoui predicte...
Tags: Health, Science, US, Trends, Healthcare, Astrazeneca, Fda, GlaxoSmithKline, Pfizer, Biotech, Business Insider, Trump, Johnson Johnson, Sanofi, Soweto South Africa, Pharmaceutical


Drug companies are recruiting Black Americans to participate in COVID-19 vaccine trials, trying to break down decades of mistrust

A volunteer receives an injection from a medical worker. Siphiwe Sibeko/Pool via AP Black Americans have been affected by the coronavirus at a disproportionate rate, but many have been wary to participate in vaccine trials. The mistrust, experts told Insider, stems from decades of medical experimentation on Black Americans. At least two pharmaceutical companies developing vaccines — Moderna and Pfizer — have been trying to recruit more Black participants in their trials. Some HBCUs, includ...
Tags: Science, News, Cdc, Stanford, US, Trends, Georgia, Cnn, Racism, Trials, Pfizer, Donald Trump, Anthony Fauci, Business Insider, Trump, University of Wisconsin Madison


Push to bring coronavirus vaccines to the poor faces trouble

By MARIA CHENG and LORI HINNANT | Associated Press LONDON — An ambitious humanitarian project to deliver coronavirus vaccines to the world’s poorest people is facing potential shortages of money, cargo planes, refrigeration and vaccines themselves — and is running into skepticism even from some of those it’s intended to help most. In one of the biggest obstacles, rich countries have locked up most of the world’s potential vaccine supply through 2021, and the U.S. and others have refused to join ...
Tags: London, News, California, India, Eu, Sport, European Union, World news, Ap, Thailand, Soccer, Harvard University, Paris, Who, Associated Press, Johannesburg


Locals volunteer to be infected with coronavirus to hasten vaccine development

In 1796, English physician Edward Jenner noted that milkmaids who caught cowpox from their cattle seemed to escape a much deadlier scourge: smallpox. So the doctor collected pus from a cowpox blister on one of those milkmaids, rounded up his gardener’s 8-year-old son and rubbed the gunk into a fresh cut on the boy’s skin. The lad developed a trying but not lethal cowpox infection, and once he recovered, the doctor repeated the exercise — but this time, with the real thing. Smallpox. The boy did ...
Tags: Health, New York, News, Los Angeles, Merck, Sport, Public Health, Soccer, Healthcare, World Health Organization, Pasadena, Brad Sherman, Ucla, San Pedro, Nyu, Yang


Britain urges Zimbabwe to remove troops from the street ahead of election results

Britain has urged the Zimbabwean government to remove its troops from the streets of Harare after at least six people were killed in post-election violence between security forces and opposition supporters.  The intervention came as opposition leader Nelson Chamisa again claimed that he had won the Zimbabwe’s presidential election despite the electoral officials saying they had not completed the process of approval and collation necessary to announce them. “Announcing it is just a formality,” Mr...
Tags: News, Eu, Britain, Zimbabwe, Robert Mugabe, The Telegraph, Harare, Tendai Biti, Mugabe, Emmerson Mnangagwa, MDC, Mnangagwa, Movement for Democratic Change, MARCO LONGARI, Chamisa, Nelson Chamisa


There should be no monkeying about with hate speech

Heidi Matisonn, University of KwaZulu-Natal In February 2016, the conservative American magazine the Weekly Standard had as its cover an image of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump perched on the top of Trump Tower with a crushed plane in one hand and Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton in the other. The caption read, "King Trump". In May 2016, South African cartoonist Jonathan Shapiro, better known as Zapiro, published a cartoon depicting National Prosecuting Author...
Tags: New York, News, Africa, US, High Court, Hillary Clinton, South Africa, Jacob Zuma, Washington Dc, Johannesburg, Donald Trump, Huffington Post, Trump, Julius Malema, The Conversation Africa, Pretoria


How liberators turn into oppressors. A study of southern African states

Henning Melber, University of Pretoria This article is a foundation essay. These are longer than usual and take a wider look at a key issue affecting society. Since coming to political power, the anticolonial movements of Angola, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Namibia and South Africa have remained in control of the former settler colonies' societies. At best their track record of running the countries they helped liberate is mixed. From the "oiligarchy" in Angola under José Eduardo dos Santos and his...
Tags: Africa, South Africa, Nelson Mandela, Angola, Robert Mugabe, Huffington Post, Namibia, Jose Eduardo Dos Santos, The Conversation Africa, ANC, Mugabe, Marikana, Movement for Democratic Change, Truth and Reconciliation Commission, SWAPO, ZAPU