Posts filtered by tags: Social Sciences[x]


 

Why college reform will promote racial equality

I was very active politically in the 1960s, 70s, and the early 80s. Life became more difficult in the late 1980s with the arrival of a third child, and as I focused to publish enough to get tenure in a large Midwestern university. Today, as I look back on that time, I struggle with two perspectives about current anti-racist activism and about a continued anti-racist struggle in the academy. One of them is to believe that the current political reckoning over racism in the United States is differe...
Tags: Books, Featured, California, College, US, Blog, Atlanta, History, United States, Ferguson, Black, Social Sciences, Board of Education, Shaw, Cheyney, Wisconsin Minnesota


Art and theater after Stonewall [podcast]

As we’ve seen over recent weeks, direct action is sometimes necessary in order to exact social change. On June 28, 1969 in Greenwich Village, a bastion for New York City’s gay community, a riot broke out after police raided the popular Stonewall Inn. The demonstration became the catalyst for the modern LGBTQ movement in the United States; it immediately led to organizing and the formation of gay rights groups in New York City, and the first New York Pride march occurred on the anniversary of the...
Tags: Books, New York, Featured, Obama, New York City, America, Chicago, United States, Gay Rights, Lgbtq, Pride, Broadway Theater, Multimedia, Gay Pride, Stonewall, Social Sciences


Black studies for everyone

It is a sad commentary on the state of education in this society that educators hesitate to include a subject in the curriculum because students want to learn about it.—Armstead RobinsonIn 1968, Yale University hosted the Black Studies in the University symposium. A product of the student activism of Yale’s Black Student Alliance, the symposium would be important for the foundation of what is now Yale’s Department of African American Studies. One of the symposium’s 16 participants was Armstead R...
Tags: Books, Featured, Education, Blog, Diversity, University, United States, Yale, University Of Virginia, Richmond, Social Sciences, Angela Davis, Inclusion, Robinson, Richmond Virginia, Confederate States of America


How paternity leave can help couples stay together

The birth of a child is accompanied by many changes in a couple’s life. The first few weeks and months are a time of acquiring new skills and creating new habits which allow parents to carry on with their other responsibilities while also caring for the new family member. Many decisions need to be made: Who does the cleaning? Who does the grocery shopping? Who cooks? Who feeds and changes the baby?In recent years many countries have acknowledged the importance of fathers taking parental leave on...
Tags: Books, Featured, Marriage, Economics, Spain, Sociology, Journals, Iceland, Maternity Leave, Social Sciences, Paternity Leave, Business & Economics, Pixabay, Subtopics, Iceland Norway Sweden, Mabel Amber Public Domain


Eight books that make you think about how you treat the earth

The foods we eat, the air we breathe, the water we drink, and the climate that makes our planet livable all comes from nature. Yet, most that live here treat our planet superfluously, rather than something to be admired. During this COVID-19 pandemic, nature seems to be sending us a message: To care for ourselves we must care for nature. It’s time to take notice. This week we celebrate World Environment Day. We have compiled a list of important books that explore political issues related to the ...
Tags: Amazon, Books, Politics, Featured, Climate Change, Earth, Reading List, Social Sciences, Fitzgerald, Anatol Lieven, Lieven, Oso, Sebastian Unrau, John S Dryzek, Jonathan Pickering, Envionrment


Why recognizing different ethnic groups is good for peace

In a time of global crisis that has reproduced many inequalities and reinforced mistrust across lines of identity in diverse societies, one may easily succumb to a sense that meaningful redress and social cohesion are impossible. But, learning from contexts of large scale violence and civil war, there’s reason to believe that “recognition” based strategies can help diverse societies overcome the legacies of their painful histories.By recognition, we mean explicit reference to ethnic identities i...
Tags: Books, Politics, Featured, Iraq, Diversity, Turkey, Ethiopia, Violence, International Relations, Burundi, Rwanda, Bosnia, Social Sciences, Tigray, Burundi Rwanda, African Politics


Moving beyond toxic masculinity: a Q&A with Ronald Levant

In 2018, the American Psychological Association released its first ever Guidelines for Psychological Practice with Boys and Men. At the time of the release, these guidelines were met with criticism by some who viewed them as pathologizing masculinity, but since the guidelines were released the discussion of “toxic masculinity” has spread to all areas of our society and culture. Ronald F. Levant has served as president of American Psychological Association as well as president of the association’...
Tags: Books, Gender, Politics, Featured, Sociology, Anthropology, Social work, Social Sciences, American Psychological Association, Masculinity, Science & Medicine, Psychology & Neuroscience, Robert Bly, Toxic Masculinity, Aarón Blanco Tejedor, Ronald Levant


Envisioning a post-crisis world

Early in World War II, in August 1941, before the United States had entered the war and Britain stood alone against Adolph Hitler, President Franklin Roosevelt and Prime Minister Winston Churchill steamed in secret aboard their respective battleships and met off the coast of Newfoundland on HMS Prince of Wales. Their aim: Shape the Post War World. They drafted eight points that became the Atlantic Charter, shaping the United Nations and other lasting relationships of the post-war years.Humanity,...
Tags: Books, New York, Featured, US, Spain, Physics, Britain, United States, Global Economy, Winston Churchill, United Nations, Newfoundland, Global Economics, Churchill, Social Sciences, Zika


Understanding guilt in mother-child relationships

“You never write…you never call….” The guilt-tripping mother is common stereotype in movies and TV. But how many adult children harbor feelings of guilt toward their aging parents? Who experiences this guilt, and why?About one in five adult children experience feelings of guilt toward their ageing mothers, based on data from a nationally representative survey of 2,450 Dutch adults in 2015 who have a mother aged 55 or older. Feelings of guilt in the family have rarely been measured in a systemati...
Tags: Books, Featured, Aging, Sociology, Loneliness, Social work, Health & Medicine, Social Sciences, Social Science Research, Gerontological Society of America, Science & Medicine, Psychology & Neuroscience, Gerontology, Psychology Research, Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences, Parent Relationships


Five books to help us understand global health problems [reading list]

Health economics combines economic concepts with medical evidence to show how health care institutions function and how globalization affects global health problems. To raise awareness of the importance of the study of health economics, we have created a list of books along with free chapters that explore the policy concerns relevant to health systems in both developed and developing countries and how technology can help.Global Health Justice and Governance by Jennifer Prah RugerThe book discuss...
Tags: Books, Featured, Society, Reading List, United States, Trade, Richard Smith, Social Sciences, Oxford Economics, Mark Graham, Business & Economics, Health Economics, Global Health Justice, Ronald Labonte, William H DuttonHow, Global Health Problems


How childhood trauma resurfaces during COVID-19

Children who are victims of bullying often suffer a sense of helplessness. They don’t know what to do during bullying episodes and they don’t really believe anything will change or anyone can intervene effectively. Children subjected to bullying say it makes them feel sick, afraid, and helpless. It can also lead to feelings of anxiety, anger and depression. We know that as adults former victims can undergo similar feelings in the right circumstances.Due to my research in the area of childhood bu...
Tags: Books, Featured, Bullying, Trauma, Childhood Trauma, Helplessness, Social work, Social Sciences, Science & Medicine, Psychology & Neuroscience, Bullying Scars, Coronavirus, COVID-19, Natalia Y


How austerity measures hurt the COVID-19 response

The 2008 global financial crash brought with it a series of aftereffects that are shaping how different nations face the current pandemic. Austerity politics took a firm hold across Europe and other countries whose economies were hard hit, with governments and financial institutions arguing that they were an unavoidable consequence of the crash. While many corporations bailed out with public money recovered   rapidly , public spending continued to be curtailed under the weight of public debt...
Tags: Europe, Books, Politics, Featured, Congress, Elizabeth Warren, US, Spain, United States, Sociology, Credit Suisse, Warren, OECD, Donald Trump, Black Lives Matter, Podemos


Six tips for teachers who see emotional abuse

The scars of emotional abuse are invisible, deep, and diverse; and unfortunately, emotional abuse likely impacts more students than we think.Emotionally abusive behavior broadly consists of criticism, degradation, rejection, or threat. Emotional abuse (also known as psychological maltreatment or verbal assault) can happen anywhere, both within and outside of families, and can refer to a single severe incident or a chronic, ongoing pattern. Educators, caregivers, coaches, school mental health pro...
Tags: Books, Featured, Education, Emotional Abuse, Social work, Social Sciences, Science & Medicine, Psychology & Neuroscience, School Psychology, Okan AKGÜL


Earth Day at 50: conservation, spirituality, and climate change [podcast]

This week, the world celebrates the 50th anniversary of Earth Day. At the behest of Wisconsin Senator Gaylord Nelson, an estimated 20 million people across the United States gathered to raise awareness for environmental protection and preservation on 22 April 1970. This first Earth Day was a catalyst for the modern environmental movement; by the end of the year, the Environmental Protection Agency had been created, and the Clean Air, Clean Water, and Endangered Species Acts were all passed in Co...
Tags: Books, Podcast, Politics, Featured, Congress, Climate Change, US, United States, Conservation, Pope Francis, Wisconsin, Environmentalism, John Muir, Environmental Protection Agency, Multimedia, Sierra Club


How we can equip ourselves against climate change

Earth Day highlights the need for climate action, but what role does human-caused climate change play in creating disasters? Science paints a nuanced picture, instructing us to focus on reducing vulnerabilities to weather and climate, irrespective of how the environment is changing.Starting with the basics, a disaster is a situation requiring outside help for coping, so it is only a disaster if it involves people. Climate means weather statistics over decades. Climate change refers to changes to...
Tags: Books, Featured, Climate Change, New York City, Climate, Mexico City, Antarctica, New Orleans, Greenland, Natural Disasters, La Paz, Earth Day, Manila, Social Sciences, FREETOWN, Ilan Kelman


It’s time for the government to introduce food rationing

The current COVID-19 emergency has much to interest students of politics. Does it demonstrate that authoritarian regimes are able to tackle a pandemic rather more easily and efficiently than liberal democracies? Given the origin of the virus, what does it tell us about our relationship with non-human nature? Is the pandemic a product of globalization? What does it tell us about population size and density? What does it tell us about the nature of politics itself?Perhaps the most significant fact...
Tags: Books, Politics, Featured, Cdc, United Kingdom, Anthropology, Health & Medicine, Social Sciences, Science & Medicine, COVID-19


How downward social mobility happens

The common story about downward mobility is one of bad luck: recent generations have the misfortune of coming of age during an economic downturn, a student debt crisis, declining job security, and, now, a pandemic. Of course, these factors relate to downward mobility, but they are not all that matters. The truth is that many youth step onto mobility trajectories long before they enter the labor market. This truth is important as it can help us explain how some youth born into the same class at t...
Tags: Books, Economics, Sociology, Social Mobility, Inequality, Social Sciences, Business & Economics, Jessi Streib, Aleksandar Pasaric, Privilege Lost


How to be an ally for transgender rights

The last day of March is the International Transgender Day of Visibility, celebrated each year to honor transgender people around the world and the courage it takes to live authentically and openly. It is also an opportunity to raise awareness about the severe, ongoing discrimination and violence that transgender people often face every day. Estimates suggest that 331 transgender and gender diverse people were killed worldwide in 2019. In the United States, at least 26 transgender or gender non-...
Tags: Books, Politics, Featured, US, United States, Social Sciences, Joint Chiefs of Staff, Mike Mullen, Logan Ireland, Kimberley Shappley, Sara Rampazzo


How to rate and rank potential doctoral students

Graduate education, particularly the training of doctoral students, plays crucial role in the progress of society. Around 1,500 of the country’s 4,500 or so universities award doctoral degrees. In 2018 according to the Survey of Earned Doctorates 55,185 students were doctorate recipients in the United States.To match potential graduate students and graduate programs needs the interplay among students, college professors as evaluators, and admission committees.  Many academics are involved in the...
Tags: Books, Education, University, United States, Ranking, Student, Social Sciences, Science & Medicine, Psychology & Neuroscience, Peter Erdi, Joshua Golde


How we can equip ourselves against climate change

Earth Day highlights the need for climate action, but what role does human-caused climate change play in creating disasters? Science paints a nuanced picture, instructing us to focus on reducing vulnerabilities to weather and climate, irrespective of how the environment is changing.Starting with the basics, a disaster is a situation requiring outside help for coping, so it is only a disaster if it involves people. Climate means weather statistics over decades. Climate change refers to changes to...
Tags: Books, Featured, Climate Change, New York City, Climate, Mexico City, Antarctica, New Orleans, Greenland, Natural Disasters, La Paz, Earth Day, Manila, Social Sciences, FREETOWN, Ilan Kelman


How African presidents rig elections to stay in office

There are at least 19 African countries where the heads-of-state have overstayed beyond their term limits via (un)constitutional revisions: Algeria, Angola, Burkina Faso, Burundi, Cameroon, Chad, Congo-Brazzaville, Cote d’Ivoire, the Democratic Republic of the Congo , Egypt, Equatorial Guinea, Gabon, Guinea (which is trying once more in 2020), Rwanda, Senegal, Togo, Tunisia, Uganda, and Zimbabwe. But there are also 11 notable European countries that have no term limits at all on how long the Pri...
Tags: Books, Politics, Elections, Featured, United Kingdom, Angola, Zimbabwe, Kenya, Journals, Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Malawi, Social Sciences, Constitutional Court, Great Lakes Region, African Affairs


How New York City became a technology hub

Recently in New York, as in other cities, the coronavirus pandemic has spurred an urgent shift from working in offices to working at home and given a massive boost to digital platforms for telecommuting, teleconferencing, and online teaching. Yet the tech industry has also generated some of the most significant spaces for face-to-face interaction of recent years. These are the hackathons, meetups, startup accelerators, and innovation districts that make up a globally hegemonic innovation complex...
Tags: Facebook, Books, New York, Featured, New York City, San Francisco, Brooklyn, United States, Chelsea, Sociology, Manhattan, Conde Nast, World Trade Center, Seattle, Hudson, Log


How religion affects global pandemics

People sometimes see religion as an unwelcome infection affecting the secular politics of international relations. Such attitudes easily present themselves in consideration of terrorism and violence. Religion is seen to distort and hamper the healthy peaceful progress of secular politics, operating as an outside pathogen that inflames tensions and challenges already present in global affairs.Religion is also said to play a role in the spread of novel coronavirus (COVID-19). Authorities are linki...
Tags: Europe, Books, Featured, Osama Bin Laden, Saudi Arabia, China, Religion, US, Jerusalem, America, Iran, Taliban, Pakistan, Korea, Who, Bill De Blasio


Governments should tackle air pollution by banning old cars

Air pollution continues to be a serious problem in many cities around the world in part because of a steady increase in car use. In an effort to contain such a trend and persuade drivers to give up their cars in favor of public transport, authorities increasingly rely on limits to car use. Some places have banned drivers from using their vehicles on certain days of the week. Good examples of these driving restrictions include Athens (where restrictions were introduced in 1982), Santiago (1986), ...
Tags: Books, Featured, Climate Change, Mexico, Germany, Economics, Rome, Beijing, Air Pollution, Pollution, Santiago, Paris, Mexico City, Athens, Journals, Manila


Why cost-benefit analysis is flawed and how to improve it

Cost-benefit analysis is a key component of the US regulatory state. How it works and the function it plays in policymaking is not widely understood, however. Even the most substantive media outlets rarely discuss it. But cost-benefit analysis is a linchpin of the regulatory process. Its structure and role—and its flaws—should therefore be grist for an informed public conversation.Any given proposed regulation would have various impacts on people’s  well-being. Consider, for example, a proposed ...
Tags: Books, Featured, US, Bob, Environmental Protection Agency, Executive Branch, Alice, Social Sciences, Xavier, Casey, Jeremy Bentham, Business & Economics, Dalia, Office of Management and Budget Cost, Dalia Casey, Bob Increasing Alice


Why Iran’s dependence on China puts it at risk

The depth of ties between China and Iran was revealed dramatically in late February 2020, when news broke that some of Tehran’s most senior officials had contracted the coronavirus. By early March, one of Iran’s vice presidents, the deputy health minister, and 23 members of parliament were reported ill. A member of the 45-person Expediency Council charged with advising Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei died, and even the head of Iran’s coronavirus task force is sick. After China and Italy, Iran has mo...
Tags: Silk Road, Asia, Books, Politics, Featured, Obama, Washington, Saudi Arabia, China, Russia, India, US, Iran, History, Beijing, United States


Why Iran’s dependence on China puts it risk

The depth of ties between China and Iran was revealed dramatically in late February 2020, when news broke that some of Tehran’s most senior officials had contracted the coronavirus. By early March, one of Iran’s vice presidents, the deputy health minister, and 23 members of parliament were reported ill. A member of the 45-person Expediency Council charged with advising Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei died, and even the head of Iran’s coronavirus task force is sick. After China, Iran has more confirm...
Tags: Silk Road, Asia, Books, Politics, Featured, Obama, Washington, Saudi Arabia, China, Russia, India, US, Iran, History, Beijing, United States


Four women’s quest to end global poverty

Gender matters for policymaking: there is no better evidence than the experience of four women who, twenty years ago, became ministers in charge of international development in their governments and collaborated to develop new approaches to end global poverty. Eveline Herfkens from the Netherlands, Hilde F. Johnson from Norway, Clare Short from the United Kingdom, and Heidemarie Wieczorek-Zeul from Germany became known as the Utstein Four (from the Norwegian Utstein Abbey where they launched the...
Tags: Books, Featured, Germany, Africa, Research, United Kingdom, United Nations, Un, Norway, Johnson, Clare Short, Millennium development goals, Gender Issues, Social Sciences, Richard Jolly, Global Poverty


100 years of the Nineteenth Amendment and women’s political action

On 28 August 2020 we celebrate the 100th anniversary of the day the Nineteenth Amendment to the US Constitution was ratified. Although the Amendment did not enfranchise all women –African American, Native American, and Latina women would wait decades before they could vote on equal terms– the event is an important milestone in women’s political history.Suffrage activists on the eve of the Amendment disagreed heartily over how the struggle for women’s equality should continue, and the recent rise...
Tags: Books, Politics, Elections, Featured, Voting, Congress, US, Sociology, Oxford University, Women in politics, Social Sciences, Emily, Latina, Jeanette Rankin, Women's History Month, Social Movements


Seven psychology books that explore why we are who we are [reading list]

Social Psychology looks at the nature and causes of individual behavior in social situations. It asks how others’ actions and behaviors shape our actions and behaviors, how our identities are shaped by the beliefs and assumptions of our communities. Fundamentally it looks for scientific answers to the most philosophical questions of self. These seven books about a range of issues within social psychology—identity, gender and sexuality, radicalism, social assumptions and biases—address just a few...
Tags: Books, Politics, Isis, Featured, Islamic State, Aging, America, Reading List, Atlantic, Sociology, Nazi, Stonewall, Social Psychology, Social Sciences, Trump, McAdams