Posts filtered by tags: Sorbonne[x]


 

Two Unknown Artemisia Gentileschi Paintings Have Turned Up In The Wreckage Of A Beirut Museum

Art historian Gregory Buchakjian did his Master’s thesis at the Sorbonne on the art collection of the Sursock Palace, where he identified two unattributed canvases as the work of the 17th-century Italian painter. With the decades-long turmoil in the Lebanese capital, Buchakjian and the rest of the world forgot about those two paintings — until the catastrophic explosion in Beirut on August 4, 2020. In that disaster’s aftermath, the paintings were found in the ruined palace, damaged but intact. ...
Tags: Art, Beirut, Visual, Sorbonne, Sursock Palace, 06.09.21, Beirut Museum, Gregory Buchakjian, Buchakjian


Elon Musk said the Biden administration rejected his idea of a carbon tax as 'too politically difficult'

Tesla CEO Elon Musk. Yasin Ozturk/Anadolu Agency via Getty Images Tesla CEO Elon Musk said he suggested a carbon tax to the Biden administration. The idea was rejected as being "too politically difficult," he said on the Joe Rogan Experience podcast. Musk has advocated a carbon tax since 2015. Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories. Elon Musk says he suggested a carbon tax to the Biden administration, but the idea was dismissed as too divisive.Appearing on the Joe Rogan Exp...
Tags: Spacex, Elon Musk, Texas, Climate Change, Trends, Tesla, Bloomberg, Joe Biden, Paris, Argentina, SEC, Biden, Carbon Tax, Musk, Trump, Trump White House


Hear a Prehistoric Conch Shell Musical Instrument Played for the First Time in 18,000 Years

Photo by C. Fritz, Muséum d’Histoire naturelle de Toulouse Brian Eno once defined art as “everything you don’t have to do.” But just because humans can live without art doesn’t mean we should—or that we ever have—unless forced by exigent circumstance. Even when we spent most of our time in the business of survival, we still found time for art and music. Marsoulas Cave, for example, “in the foothills of the French Pyrenees, has long fascinated researchers with its colorful paintings depicting bi...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Life, Spain, History, New Zealand, Smithsonian, Peru, The New York Times, University Of California, Toulouse, Walter, Atlantic Ocean, First Time, Facebook Twitter


The Capital Note: China Bulls Shop, Europe’s Sour Grapes

Welcome to the Capital Note, a newsletter about business, finance and economics. On the menu today: China’s successful bond issue, America’s high tech (and the resentment it generates in the EU), China’s Covid exports (no, not that one) and the end of risk-free assets.China Bulls Shop U.S. investors facing meager returns on developed-market bonds bought up record amounts of Chinese sovereign debt in a bond offering today. According to the Wall Street Journal, U.S. investors bought at least $250...
Tags: Apple, Google, Amazon, Europe, News, Yahoo, Washington, France, China, Germany, US, America, Eu, European Union, Beijing, Atlantic


Christiane Eda-Pierre, France’s First Black Opera Star, Dead At 88

Born in Martinique to an accomplished family (an aunt was the first black female student at the Sorbonne), she first made her mark in coloratura roles such as Leïla in The Pearl Fishers and the title role in Lakmé. She went on to have a stellar career in Paris and abroad, noted especially for Mozart, Rameau (she sang in the first modern revivals of several of his operas), and contemporary works (she created the role of the Angel in Messiaen’s Saint François d’Assise). – Barron’s (AFP)
Tags: Art, People, Paris, Martinique, Messiaen, Leila, Sorbonne, Francois, Mozart Rameau, 09.07.20, Christiane Eda Pierre France, First Black Opera Star Dead, Assise Barron


Sylvia Beach Tells the Story of Founding Shakespeare and Company, Publishing Joyce’s Ulysses, Selling Copies of Hemingway’s First Book & More (1962)

Revisiting Ernest Hemingway’s A Moveable Feast a couple of decades after I read it last, I notice a few things right away: I am still moved by the prose and think it’s as impressive as ever; I am less moved by the machismo and alcoholism and more interested in characters like Sylvia Beach, founder of Shakespeare and Company, the bookstore that served as a base of operations for the famed Lost Generation of writers in Paris. “Sylvia had a lively, sharply sculptured face, brown eyes that w...
Tags: Google, Books, England, College, France, Nazis, America, Harvard, Ireland, Paris, Literature, Shakespeare, Random House, James Joyce, Hemingway, Ernest Hemingway


Tesla has a huge lead over other automakers. See how the electric-car company's brand became so mighty. (TSLA)

For years, potential competitors kept an eye on Tesla as it absorbed all the risk of creating a viable market for electric vehicles. While the electric-vehicle market hovers in the single digits, the conventional wisdom was that Tesla would exhaust itself proving that consumers actually wanted to go electric. But with the EV market now poised to rapidly grow, Tesla finds itself with the most powerful brand, nurtured for more than a decade by charismatic, controversial CEO Elon Musk. Visit Busi...
Tags: Facebook, Spacex, Robert Downey Jr, California, La, Berlin, US, Trends, General Motors, Tesla, Paypal, Vw, Ford, Mary Barra, Shanghai, TSLA


Tesla's history can be traced through numerous milestones. Here are the top 25 moments that shaped the electric carmaker over 16 years. (TSLA)

Tesla has been around for 16 years, and in that time period, CEO Elon Musk's all-electric carmaker has established an astonishing number of milestones. I rounded up the most significant 25. They range from the original Roadster, which made electric cars cool, to the insane Cybertruck, plus quite a few other adventures along the way. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Tesla is 16 years old. It turns 17 in July. In the nearly two decades it's been around, the Silicon Valley ele...
Tags: Facebook, Spacex, Elon Musk, China, Berlin, US, Los Angeles, Trends, Tesla, Paypal, Ford, Paris, Gm, Peter Thiel, Silicon Valley, Toyota


Last Five Minutes of Fame

Last Five Minutes of Fame LAST FIVE MINUTES OF FAME Abe Gurko It was 1973; I was short, fat, and four-eyed with no immediate hopes of having a life worth living. By this point in my teens—-bittersweet sixteen to be exact—-the only thing I aspired to be was someone else. Preferably someone famous. By no means was I a candidate for becoming a jet setter, and no foreseeable signs of hobnobbing with the lanky Mick Jagger, the groovy Penelope Tree or the beautiful, haunted Marianne Faithfull. Nope...
Tags: Hollywood, Kim Kardashian, Montana, France, New York City, Breaking Newzzz, Last Five Minutes of Fame, Brooklyn, New Jersey, Clint Eastwood, Mick Jagger, Manhattan, Andy Warhol, Newark, Missy Elliot, Dustin Hoffman


A 19th-Century Opera That Flipped The Script On The Passive-Princess-Versus-Wicked-Queen Narrative

And that opera, Le Dernier Sorcier (The Last Sorcerer), was composed by a woman — Pauline Viardot, remembered mostly for being one of the century’s great mezzos. Amy Lorette Damron Kyle, a musicologist at the Sorbonne and a singer herself, compares Viardot’s Sorcier to one of opera’s classic passive princess/wicked queen stories, Mozart’s The Magic Flute. – The Conversation
Tags: Art, Music, Mozart, Sorbonne, Pauline Viardot, Viardot, 12.05.19, Amy Lorette Damron Kyle


How did an accused torturer end up teaching at the Sorbonne?

Mario Sandoval charged with dictatorship-era crimes in Argentina – so how could he have worked undetected at a top French university?Mario Sandoval had been living in France for 14 years when he became a lecturer at the Institute of Latin American Studies (IHEAL) at the Sorbonne in Paris.The Argentinian security specialist was in his mid-40s, spoke good French and had recently obtained French citizenship. His credentials were impeccable – he’d spent the previous five years teaching international...
Tags: Europe, Education, France, Americas, World news, Higher Education, Paris, Argentina, Sandoval, Sorbonne, Mario Sandoval, Institute of Latin American Studies IHEAL, Université Marne la Vallée


Genius Series: The defiant life of Marie Curie

Big Think has just launched its Genius Series of tees, sweatshirts, posters and more!We're paying tribute to the first female Nobel Prize winner, Marie Curie.Select Rush or Super Rush Delivery to get your order before Christmas Day! None Life is not easy for any of us. But what of that? We must have perseverance and above all confidence in ourselves. We must believe that we are gifted for something, and that this thing, at whatever cost, must be attained. – Marie Curie None Marie Curie was a tra...
Tags: Science, Design, Women, History, Chemistry, Physics, Paris, Innovation, Poland, Marie Curie, Curie, Sorbonne, Pierre Curie, Marie Curie None Marie Curie, Nikola Tesla Isaac Newton


Suspected Argentinian torturer who taught at Sorbonne extradited by France

Ex-police officer Mario Sandoval alleged to be ‘butcher’ of dictatorship, held over student’s disappearanceA former Argentinian police officer who spent years working as an academic at the Sorbonne has been extradited by France to face trial over the disappearance of a student who went missing during the “dirty war” in the late 1970s.Mario Sandoval, 66, is accused of being one of the most notorious torturers of the Argentinian dictatorship era – a man nicknamed Churrasco (Barbecue) for his habit...
Tags: Europe, France, Americas, World news, Argentina, Sorbonne, Mario Sandoval


Paris Sees Blackface Controversy As Students Protest Aeschylus Staging At Sorbonne

Denouncing the staging (which no one had yet seen) as “Afrophobic, colonialist and racist,” protesters forced the Sorbonne to cancel a performance of The Suppliants at the university’s annual festival of ancient Greek theatre. Top Sorbonne officials and government officials called the protests “absurd,” while the director insisted that the production used no blackface at all. – The Guardian
Tags: Art, Theatre, Paris, SJ, Sorbonne, 03.28.19


Greek tragedy prompts 'blackface' racism row at Sorbonne

Demonstrators picket French university, which says actors were wearing masks according to ancient theatre practicesA row over alleged racism and attacks on freedom of expression has erupted in France after students prevented a Greek tragedy featuring actors using black masks from being performed at the Sorbonne, claiming it was “Afrophobic, colonialist and racist”.Demonstrators who picketed the prestigious Paris university to stop actors entering the theatre said the play, The Suppliants by Aesc...
Tags: Europe, Education, France, Race, Theatre, World news, Higher Education, Paris, Universities, Aeschylus, Sorbonne


France faces blackface debate after Greek play blockaded

PARIS (AP) — France is grappling with its own version of a blackface scandal, after activists blocked a theater performance at the Sorbonne university in Paris involving actors with black masks. Four black rights groups staged the protest Monday against a performance of “The Suppliants” by ancient Greek playwright Aeschylus, arguing the masks promote racist […]
Tags: News, Entertainment, France, Ap, Nation, Paris, Aeschylus, Sorbonne


The Feast Day of Anna Julia Cooper

If you have a moment today, read about Anna Julia Cooper , the Holy Woman whose feast day we celebrate.  The mother of Black Feminism, she was an educator through and through.  She was born in 1858 in North Carolina, daughter of a slave and her white slaveholder.  Among her achievements was a PhD from the Sorbonne which she earned at age 65. And she lived to be 105 years old.   Many of the saints we recognize in the Episcopal Church, especially the women, are such high achievers that when ...
Tags: Religion, North Carolina, Cooper, Episcopal Church, Sorbonne, Speaking to the Soul, Anna Julia Cooper, Sophia Holy Wisdom, Anna Julia Cooper May


7 women inspiring Twitter on the International Day of Women and Girls in Science

Scroll through Twitter, and you'll see the trending hashtag WomenInScience. February 11 is International Day of Women and Girls in Science: a time to recognize the ladies making the world a better place through science and technology. Their success stories should really be celebrated every day, especially because science remains a male-dominated field. Less than 30 percent of the world's researchers are women, according to the UNESCO Institute for Statistics. SEE ALSO: 8 ways you can emp...
Tags: Science, Obama, Nasa, Hawaii, Un, Tanzania, Burkina Faso, Cambridge University, Marie Curie, FAO, Nat Geo, Alan Shepard, Sahel, Hansen, International Atomic Energy Agency, Katherine Johnson


How the internet is celebrating International Day of Women and Girls in Science

Scroll through Twitter, and you'll see the trending hashtag WomenInScience. February 11 is International Day of Women and Girls in Science: a time to recognize the ladies making the world a better place through science and technology. Their success stories should really be celebrated every day, especially because science remains a male-dominated field. Less than 30 percent of the world's researchers are women, according to the UNESCO Institute for Statistics. SEE ALSO: 8 ways you can emp...
Tags: Science, Obama, Nasa, Hawaii, Un, Tanzania, Burkina Faso, Cambridge University, Marie Curie, FAO, Nat Geo, Alan Shepard, Sahel, Hansen, International Atomic Energy Agency, Katherine Johnson


Gloria and Emilio Estefan to receive Gershwin song prize

PASADENA, Calif. (AP) — Gloria Estefan didn’t think she’d get married. Her focus was on attending the Sorbonne in Paris. But Emilio Estefan “landed in her lap” and music became her career. The native Cubans will receive the Library of Congress Gershwin Prize for Popular Song in May. They are the first married couple (together […]
Tags: News, Entertainment, Ap, Nation, Paris, Gloria, Pasadena Calif, Gershwin, Congress Gershwin Prize for Popular Song, Gloria Estefan, Emilio Estefan, Sorbonne


Facing inflation alone: Juan de Mariana and his struggle against monetary chaos

Facing inflation alone: Juan de Mariana and his struggle against monetary chaos Until September 8, 1609, Juan de Mariana did not appear to have been fully aware of just how risky it can be to participate publicly in an ideological debate, especially when one places the pillar of private property at the center of one’s political and economic theory. On that day a group of armed men headed by one Miguel de Múgica broke into the Jesuit monastery at Toledo and ...
Tags: Europe, France, Religion, America, Spain, Rome, Cologne, Paris, Italy, Amsterdam, Flanders, Treasury, Vatican, Catholic Church, Jesus, Prince


Meet the Team – Nikki Hill

Hi everyone, My name is Nikki and I have just begun working at Web-Translations as a Project Manager. I’ve joined the company with a few years of project management experience under my belt in both the translation and localisation industry and also, funnily enough, the orthodontics industry; learning languages definitely takes you down avenues that you wouldn’t have ever expected to see when starting your career! This particular role offered an interesting mix of customer service, sales, credit...
Tags: Europe, London, Paris, Linguistics, Yorkshire, European Commission, Brussels, University of Warwick, Newcastle University, Nikki Hill, Nikki, Sorbonne


When you’ve got to figure out how to live loved

Teaching children about God’s never stopping, never giving up, unbreaking, always and Forever Love is something that my dear friend Sally Lloyd-Jones has done well. You can’t help but fall in love with this woman of deep theological truths and endearing warmth.  She has a way of preaching the gospel to children (and adults too) that I’ve never experienced before. And our kids have literally been raised up on The Jesus Storybook Bible  (over a million  copies  sold!)  and now Sally is givin...
Tags: Books, England, Children, Religion, Guest Posts, Corrie Ten Boom, New York Times, Cornwall, Matthew, East Africa, Sally, Tim Keller, Zondervan, Sally Lloyd Jones, Cornwall Cornwall, Sorbonne


Equilibrio: LINDA KARSHAN - "Art, Architecture and Sacred Geometry in Conversation" at the Abbey of San Giorgio Maggiore in Venice

From Equilibrio by Linda Karshan - Choir of San Giorgio Maggiore - Photo Cat Bauer (Venice, Italy) If you title an exhibition, Equilibrio, with a subtitle of Art, Architecture and Sacred Geometry in Conversation, and the venue is the Benedictine Church of San Giorgio Maggiore, designed by Palladio, you will be sure to catch my attention. It was not what I expected. American artist Linda Karshan says that she is "after the most perfect line," and that she feels like the Vitruvian Man. T...
Tags: Travel, London, Minnesota, Connecticut, Italy, Venice, Peter, Basilica, Abbey, Linda, Giotto, Davey, Brescia, San Giorgio Maggiore, Equilibrio, Sorbonne


Equilibrio: LINDA KARSHAN - Art, Architecture and Sacred Geometry in Conversation at the Abbey of San Giorgio Maggiore in Venice

From Equilibrio by Linda Karshan - Choir of San Giorgio Maggiore - Photo Cat Bauer (Venice, Italy) If you title an exhibition, Equilibrio, with a subtitle of Art, Architecture and Sacred Geometry in Conversation, and the venue is the Benedictine Church of San Giorgio Maggiore, designed by Palladio, you will be sure to catch my attention. It was not what I expected. American artist Linda Karshan says that she is "after the most perfect line," and that she feels like the Vitruvian Man. T...
Tags: Travel, London, Minnesota, Connecticut, Italy, Venice, Peter, Basilica, Abbey, Linda, Giotto, Davey, Brescia, San Giorgio Maggiore, Equilibrio, Sorbonne


New Book Alert: Travel Journalism!

Travel journalism. It’s a glamorous profession, you probably think. Expense accounts to eat in fancy restaurants, free stays in luxury hotels, endless offers to trek the globe — sounds good, right? Well, travel journalists don’t actually do those things as much as you think. Not real ones, at least. And now that anyone can publish online, from blogs to Instagram, it’s all become a bit more complicated. Being a travel journalist is actually much more complex and nuanced than writing abo...
Tags: Travel, Amazon, Book, Journalism, Research, Tourism, Paris, Travel Writing, Heather, Sorbonne, Routledge


The influential Polish woman who changed history!

As a woman and a mother of two very strong willed daughters, I care about women and the role they play in today’s world a lot, as you can just imagine! Some made music, some climbed mountains, some loved science. Women who overcame hardship, broke records and blazed trails – shattering glass ceilings and even tougher things! Powerful woman! Image courtesy pixabay.com After reading quotes of these legendary women, you’ll know you can contribute towards the society no matter what – you don’t nee...
Tags: Wales, History, Culture, Margaret Thatcher, Amelia Earhart, Paris, Linguistics, Poland, Michelle Obama, Madonna, Jane Austen, Diana, Red Cross, Oprah Winfrey, Marie Curie, Famous People


Part of the Sorbonne...

Unless you are a teacher or a student, normally you will not be allowed to enter this building  except when there is an art exhibition – and...  there is now one ongoing. This building houses the Faculty of Law of the Sorbonne University and you find it on Place de Panthéon. It seems that what you can see from the Place was part of an end-of-the-18thcentury project which also included what was supposed to become the Sainte-Géneviève church, but which finally became the Panthéon, with J-...
Tags: Travel, Sorbonne University, Sorbonne, Peter Olson, Paris 5, J G Soufflot, Sophie Verger, Rue Saint Jacques, Jacques Cujas, Rue Cujas


Paris: How to experience the French Open on a budget

The French Open takes place every spring, from late May to early June, at the Roland Garros tennis venue in Paris. The best players in the world set foot on the famous red clay courts as stylish Parisians and tennis fans cheer them on. It’s a dramatic two-week tournament that features sensational tennis and a fun atmosphere for spectators. You might think that this world-class sporting event would be out of the reach of a budget traveler — but it’s not! With tickets starting at only €15 and the ...
Tags: Travel, Sports, Tennis, Paris, Luxembourg, French Open, Ticketmaster, Dailycheapo, Metro, Don, Cheapos, Roland Garros, Craig Nelson, Jardin, Sorbonne, Philippe Chatrier


A student leader is the latest victim of France’s obsession with the hijab | Rokhaya Diallo

Media attacks on Maryam Pougetoux show how Muslim women are prevented from engaging in French public life“She wears a particular veil that covers all her hair, the neck: a hijab”. Last Tuesday on French TV two men – a pundit, Thomas Legrand, and celebrity host, Yann Barthès – described in detail a woman’s outfit before labelling it “the opposite of feminism”. Few people in France appeared surprised. For the past two weeks the hijab has once more been at the centre of a national debate that has v...
Tags: Europe, Gender, Politics, Media, France, Religion, Women, World news, Race issues, Islam, Women in politics, Inequality, Sorbonne, Thomas Legrand, Yann Barthés, Rokhaya Diallo