Posts filtered by tags: Stefan Kac[x]


 

Lasch—Self-Help

Christopher Lasch The Revolt of the Elites (1995) Psychoanalysis and religion were even more deeply at odds than Freud's explicit rejection of religion would imply. ... Sickness and health replaced guilt, sin, and atonement as the dominant concerns guiding those who struggled to make sense of the buried life of the mind. Psychiatrists found that their practice required a suspension of moral judgment. At the very least they found it necessary to establish a permissive atmosphere in which patie...
Tags: Politics, Self-help, Sociology, Welfare, Jazz, Freud, Frank, Don, Lawrence, Stefan Kac, Lasch, Christopher Lasch, Lasch (christopher, Bootstrapping And Bootstrappers


Lasch—Shame

Christopher Lasch The Revolt of the Elites (1995) The therapeutic discovery of shame finds its political expression in remedial programs administered by caretakers professing to speak on behalf of the downtrodden but concerned, above all, to expand their professional jurisdiction. Steinem's "revolution from within" does not signal a flight from politics, only a continuation of politics by other means. Her therapeutic assault on shame requires political action for its completion. As a salut...
Tags: Politics, California, Self-esteem, Jazz, Shame, Steinem, Stefan Kac, Epistemology, Lasch, The 1980s, Christopher Lasch, Lasch (christopher, Steinem (gloria


Lasch—Education and Politics

Christopher Lasch The Revolt of the Elites (1995) The great weakness in [Horace] Mann's educational philosophy was the assumption that education takes place only in schools. Perhaps it is unfair to say that Mann bequeathed this fatal assumption to subsequent generations of educators... An inability to see beyond the school after all—a tendency to speak as if schooling and education were synonymous terms—should probably be regarded as an occupational hazard of professional educators, a form of...
Tags: Politics, Education, Jazz, Human Development, Mann, Horace, Stefan Kac, Epistemology, Lasch, Christopher Lasch, Lasch (christopher, Mann (horace


Lasch—Of Valor, Chivalry, and Brains

Christopher Lasch The Revolt of the Elites (1995) The upper middle class, the heart of the new professional and managerial elites, is defined, apart from its rapidly rising income, not so much by its ideology as by a way of life that distinguishes it, more and more unmistakably, from the rest of the population. Even its feminism—that is, its commitment to the two-career family—is a matter more of practical necessity than of political conviction. Efforts to define a "new class" composed of pub...
Tags: Art, Hong Kong, Hollywood, Southeast Asia, Jazz, Brussels, Reich, Robert Reich, Madison Avenue, Sontag, Minimalism, Stefan Kac, Interpretation, Lasch, Postmodernism And Postmodernists, Christopher Lasch


Lasch—Crises of Competence

Christopher Lasch The Revolt of the Elites (1995) Dewey's exchange with Lippman raises the disturbing question of whether democracy implies high standards of personal conduct. Unlike many contemporary liberals, Dewey clearly thought it did. ... Like other progressive thinkers...Dewey was bent on refuting critics of democracy who claimed that it fostered mediocrity, self-indulgence, an excess love of comfort, sloppy workmanship, and a timid conformity to prevailing opinion. The idea that ...
Tags: Democracy, Apathy, Current Events, Jazz, Third World, Dewey, Lippman, Societies, Pluralism, Tolerance, Stefan Kac, Lasch, Christopher Lasch, Lasch (christopher, Lippman (walter, Competence And Competents


Lasch—Meritocracy

Christopher Lasch The Revolt of the Elites (1995) Meritocracy is a parody of democracy. It offers opportunities for advancement, in theory at least, to anyone with the talent to seize them, but "opportunities to rise," as R.H. Tawney points out in Equality, "are no substitute for a general diffusion of the means of civilization," of the "dignity and culture" that are needed by all "whether they rise or not." Social mobility does not undermine the influence of elites; if anything, it help...
Tags: Politics, Democracy, Economics, Earth, Self-esteem, Sociology, Jazz, Social Mobility, Justin Smith, Young, Morrill, Michael Young, Hanna Rosin, Conant, Stefan Kac, Meritocracy


Lasch—Omnicompetence

Christopher Lasch The Revolt of the Elites (1995) According to Walter Lippman...the "omnicompetent citizen" was an anachronism in the age of specialization. In any case, most citizens, he thought, cared very little about the substance of public policy. The purpose of journalism was not to encourage public debate but to provide experts with the information on which to base intelligent decisions.(p. 10) (This "in opposition to John Dewey and other veterans of the progressive movement.") ...
Tags: Media, Education, Democracy, Religion, Information, Judaism, Jazz, Debate, Academia, John Dewey, Dewey, Lippman, Stefan Kac, Objectivity, Lasch, Descaling


Representationalism as Certainty

Evidently this has been making the rounds: Rittenhouse When I look at this image, I see a concept made perfectly transparent and rendered powerfully with a high degree of technical and aesthetic skill alike. I see a devastating and pessimistic statement made pleasing to look at. Like a "beautiful" but "sad" piece of music, this makes for a particulary powerful combination. All of this is familiar, though it is not to be taken for granted. It is unusual to find the technical skill and the powe...
Tags: Politics, Current Events, Jazz, Abstraction, McLuhan, Political Art, Stefan Kac, Maturity, Representation, Aesthetics


Bodies and Artifacts (iv-b)—Jean and LeRoi together again

(previously) Whereas Jean makes much of the elements of craft, technique, proven methods which make the artist a worker in a working world,(p. 406) LeRoi bends over backward to downplay this part. as I have said before, Negro music is the result of certain more or less specific ways of thinking about the world. Given this consideration, all talk of technical application is certainly after the fact.(p. 211) And earlier, The trumpets, trombones, and tubas of the brass bands were played with ...
Tags: Race, America, Jazz, Technique, Black, Jean, Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie, Stefan Kac, Gershwins, Leroi, Functionalism And Functionalists, Sociology And Sociologists, Jones (leroi, Cassou (jean, Charleston Cotton Club


Bodies and Artifacts (second interlude)—Arendt's Things

Christopher Lasch The Minimal Self (1984) Commodities are produced for immediate consumption. ... They wear out even if they are not used, since they are designed to be superseded by "new and improved" products, changing fashions, and technological innovations. ... Articles produced for use, on the other hand, without regard to their marketability, wear out only when they are literally used up. "It is this durability", Hannah Arendt once observed, "that gives the things of the world their relat...
Tags: Jazz, Philosophy, Hannah Arendt, Stefan Kac, Arendt, Christopher Lasch, Functionalism And Functionalists, Bodies And Artifacts (series, Arendt (hannah, Lasch (christopher


Bodies and Artifacts (iv-a)—A Story of Jean and LeRoi

Jean Cassou "The Nostalgia for a Métier" in Art History: An Anthology of Modern Criticism (1963) ed. Wylie Sypher pp. 399-409 Think of the tragedy of modern artistic consciousness. Try to discern first of all what it really is. We are led back to the inception of the creative act, where the artist can do only what springs from himself alone; and without knowing what his work will be or how it will be received (save that he is utterly sure it will be refused) he appears as a nearly unknown, usel...
Tags: Church, West, Blues, Jazz, Auschwitz, Expression, Parker, Haydn, Cezanne, Jean, White America, Stefan Kac, The Audience, Reception, Leroi, Bodies And Artifacts (series


Bodies and Artifacts (interlude)—Freud's Body-Ego

Freud The Ego and the Id (orig. 1923) trans. Joan Riviere, ed. James Strachey I think we shall gain a great deal by following the suggestion of a writer who, from personal motives, vainly asserts that he has nothing to do with the rigours of pure science. I am speaking of Georg Groddeck, who is never tired of insisting that what we call our ego behaves essentially passively in life, and that, as he expresses it, we are 'lived' by unknown and uncontrollable forces. We have all had impressions of...
Tags: Jazz, Freud, Psychoanalysis, Stefan Kac, Interludes, James Strachey, Freud (sigmund, Bodies And Artifacts (series, The Body-ego, Joan Riviere, Georg Groddeck, Groddeck


Bodies and Artifacts (iii)—Jones' Voice

LeRoi Jones Blues People (1963) For a Westerner to say that the Wagnerian tenor's voice is "better" than the African singer's or the blues singer's is analogous to a non-Westerner disparaging Beethoven's Ninth Symphony because it wasn't improvised. (p. 30) So what if a Westerner says this about Beethoven? What if a small but vocal subculture emerges within the Western world itself where this disparagement of Beethoven is nothing less than the storefront signage, the secret handshake, and the...
Tags: Ethics, Beethoven, Jazz, Technique, Bodies, Mccarthy, Jones, Abstraction, Abstract Art, Desmond, Parker, Charlie Parker, Paul Desmond, Ravel, Stefan Kac, Aesthetics


Bodies and Artifacts (ii)—Partch's Corporeality

Harry Partch Genesis of a Music (1974, orig. 1949) For the essentially vocal and verbal music of the individual—a Monophonic concept—the word Corporeal may be used, since it is a music that is vital to a time and place, a here and now.(p. 8) Hmm. I thought corporeal meant something like "relating to a person's body, especially as opposed to their spirit." (-Google) The epic chant is an example, but the term could be applied with equal propriety to almost any other important ancient and near...
Tags: Google, Production, Current Events, Jazz, Philosophy, Un, Harry, Bodies, Abstraction, Abstract Art, Wolf, Don, Lawrence, Bach, Stefan Kac, Partch


Bodies and Artifacts (i)—Sennett's Graffiti

Richard Sennett The Conscience of the Eye (1990) I often saw this graffiti [of the New York subways] in my mind's eye when I listened to my son play the violin. The Suzuki violin method teaches a child to play music before he or she knows the names of the notes; the method stresses beauty of tone and expression from the first lesson. When a pupil first begins the violin in the Suzuki method, the teacher therefore performs a generous act. On the neck of the violin the teacher tapes down two litt...
Tags: New York, Education, Jazz, Philosophy, Public Art, Technique, Graffiti, Suzuki, Stefan Kac, Violin, Egotism, Sennett, Richard Sennett, Suzuki Method, Bodies And Artifacts (series, Sennett (richard


When More Is Less

E.O. Wilson Consilience (1998) The explanation for the rarity of great beauty may be (and I continue to speculate) the behavioral phenomenon known as the supernormal stimulus . Widespread among animal species, it is the preference during communication for signals that exaggerate the norms even if they rarely if ever occur in nature. e.g. Male butterflies who can be more attracted to mechanical replicas that have the biggest, brightest, and most rapidly moving wings than to actual females. ...
Tags: Jazz, Evolution, Wilson, Stefan Kac, Aesthetics, Mechanisms Of Devolution, Fakes And Fakery, Asceticism And Ascetics, Wilson (eo


Stephenson, PTMC—Postulates

William Stephenson The Play Theory of Mass Communication (1987 edition) (orig. 1967) 1. Play is distinguishable from work. Play is disinterested, self-sufficient, an interlude from work. It brings no material gain. (Prizes are for show; amateurs play for fun, professionals for money.) Work is not disinterested, is not an interlude in the day for most people. It produces goods, services or ideas, etc., by application of effort for a purpose. 2. Much work and play is subject to social control, an...
Tags: Media, Education, Jazz, Matt Taibbi, Stephenson, William Stephenson, Stefan Kac, Riesman, Descaling, Play Theory Of Mass Communication, Stephenson (william, Talebian


Stephenson, PTMC—Work and Play and Work

William Stephenson The Play Theory of Mass Communication (1987 edition) (orig. 1967) The child at play, Freud writes, is like a poet; both "rearrange things" in their worlds "to suit them better." Both child and poet distinguish between the real world of painful emotions, frustrations, hurts, and obduracies, and the play world, where these real-world fears and hurts are transmuted into humor, pleasure, and delightful wish-fulfillment. Play is escape from what goes on painfully in the real world...
Tags: Work, Media, Play, Culture, Jazz, Pope, Tsa, Freud, Marx, Stephenson, Debussy, William Stephenson, Stefan Kac, Alexander Pope, Interpretation, Huizenga


Stephenson, PTMC—Building a Culture

William Stephenson The Play Theory of Mass Communication (1987 edition) (orig. 1967) Parts of this book are veritably littered with sigmas and derivatives, reflecting an avowed "preoccupation" with methodology. The layperson nonetheless can find their way into Stephenson's basic thesis rather easily by way of some of his own public opinion research, which he shares. e.g. Senator McCarthy's approval rating was virtually unaffected by his censure. e.g. In the U.S. Stephenson finds there are two...
Tags: Politics, Texas, Media, Education, California, Teaching, Creativity, Culture, Jazz, Mccarthy, Mozart, Mankind, Stephenson, William Stephenson, Stefan Kac, Jorn


Sutton-Smith—Intro to Stephenson, PTMC

William Stephenson The Play Theory of Mass Communication (1987 edition) (orig. 1967) from the introduction by Brian Sutton-Smith (1987): The difficulty with the notion of subjective play is that there is very little systematic scholarship on how to think about it. Most modern play theory is about observable behavior, and even that which deals with subjective play...is largely about the way in which the possession of these competencies is of functional value in school or real life adaptation. I...
Tags: Media, Education, Play, Jazz, Stephenson, William Stephenson, Stefan Kac, Huizenga, Play Theory Of Mass Communication, Stephenson (william, Sutton-smith (brian, Sutton Smith, Brian Sutton Smith, Helen -RSB- Schwartzman, Practice Led Research


kacvlog001–this is your (my) brain on mcluhan

[Author: Stefan Kac]
Tags: Jazz, Stefan Kac, Hipsterism, McLuhan (Marshall, Kacvlog, Overthinking And Overthinkers


Two On-the-Spectrum Vignettes

Ericsson and Pool Peak (2016) Francesca Happé and Pedro Vital, two researchers at King's College London, compared autistic children who develop savantlike abilities with autistic children who did not develop such abilities. They found that the autistic savants are much more likely than the nonsavants to be very detail-oriented and prone to repetitive behaviors. When something captures their attention, they will focus on it to the exclusion of everything else around them, retreating into their o...
Tags: Psychology, London, Autism, Jazz, Practice, Connor, Peak, Ericsson, Donny, Noël, King s College, Bartok, Greig, Francesca Happé, Stefan Kac, Savants


So-Called Patterns in So-Called Jazz

Steven Mithen The Singing Neanderthals (2006) The most significant survival of 'Hmmmmm' [Neanderthal communication that was "holistic, manipulative, multi-modal, musical, and mimetic"] is within language itself. One aspect of this is the presence of onomatopoeia, vocal imitation and sound synaesthesia, which are probably most readily apparent in the languages of present-day people who still live traditional lifestyles and are 'close to nature'. Another is the use of rhythm, which enables fluent...
Tags: Jazz, Patterns, Wray, Stefan Kac, Alison Wray, Formulaic Language, Linguistics And Linguists, Mithen (steven, The Singing Neanderthals, Wray (alison, Steven Mithen


Heigh Ho, Pomo

Gerald Graff "The Myth of Postmodern Breakthrough" (orig. 1979) in Critical Essays on American Postmodernism (1994) ed. Stanley Trachtenberg pp. 69-80 In an essay that asks the question, "What Was Modernism?" Harry Levin identifies the "ultimate quality" pervading the work of the moderns as "its uncompromising intellectuality." The conventions of postmodern art systematically invert this modernist intellectuality by parodying its respect for truth and significance. ... It appears that the term ...
Tags: Jazz, Meaning, Authority, CalArts, Graff, Stefan Kac, Art School, Harry Levin, Postmodernism And Postmodernists, Leslie Fiedler, Gerald Graff, Casual Conversation, Graff (gerald, Heigh Ho Pomo, Stanley Trachtenberg


signals have meanings but stimuli need not

fromA PSYCHOLOGICAL INVESTIGATIONOF THE CONTENT OF MUSIC Roger J. Watt and Roisin L. Ash 4th European Conference on Philosophy and Psychology, 1996 Meaning The meaning of a signal is the intended and agreed mental actionof that signal. Meaning is bound up with communication , so that signals have meanings , but stimuli need not . The meaning of a signal is not just the action of that signal : meaning is reserved for cases where...
Tags: Psychology, Communication, Jazz, Philosophy, Meaning, Stefan Kac, Ash (Roisin L, Musicology And Musicologists, Signals And Symbols, Watt (Roger J, Roger J Watt, Roisin L Ash


Repurposing New York's Aphorist Laureate for Very New York Purposes

When Yogi Berra plugged disability insurance, he could just as well have been talking about art: When you don't have it, that's when you need it. [Author: Stefan Kac]
Tags: Art, New York, Advertising, Current Events, Jazz, Yogi Berra, Stefan Kac, Aphorisms And Aphorists, Berra (yogi


B.W'd.Y.G addendum

A quick and bloggy addendum on looking for edification in all the wrong online places: As I continue to trawl/troll Blogspot for distant voices of reason, I am frequently reminded, for one, that this is asking a lot no matter the medium, but also that the analytic/speculative/critical orientation remains very much a preoccupation of a tiny woolly-headed minority of thinkers, even (or is it especially?) now that it has been institutionalized and co-opted. In plain English now, I am rather taken...
Tags: Books, Current Events, Originality, Jazz, Technics, Wright, Erich Fromm, Wayne Shorter, Ligeti, CalArts, Stefan Kac, Blogs Blogging And Bloggers, Metablogging, Lontano, The Book Report, PHHS


McLuhan—Mass as Simultaneity, Simultaneity as Fragility

Marshall McLuhan Understanding Media (1964) MIT Press edition (1994) In terms of the industrial age, it can be pointed out that the difference between the previous mechanical age and the new electric age appears in the different kinds of inventories. Since electricity, inventories are made up not so much of goods in storage as of materials in continuous process of transformation at spatially removed sites. For electricity not only gives primacy to process, whether in making or in learning, but ...
Tags: Media, Minneapolis, Los Angeles, Jazz, Vikings, Jane Jacobs, Tim Wu, Taleb, McLuhan, Stefan Kac, Music Scenes, Fragility And Fragilistas, Taleb (Nassim Nicholas, McLuhan (Marshall, Jacobs (jane


McLuhan—The Great Withholding

Marshall McLuhan "Woman in a Mirror" pp. 80-81 in The Mechanical Bride (2002 Gingko Press edition) [orig. 1951] This ad employs the same technique as Picasso in The Mirror. The differences, of course, are obvious enough. By setting a conventional day-self over against a tragic night-self, Picasso is able to provide a time capsule of an entire life. He reduces a full-length novel (or movie) like Madame Bovary to a single image of great intensity. By juxtaposition and contrast he is able to "say" ...
Tags: Art, New York, Advertising, Communication, Jazz, Picasso, Lambert, Debussy, McLuhan, Adorno, Stefan Kac, McLuhan (Marshall, Lambert (constant, Picasso (pablo, Syncopation And Syncopators, Whitehead (alfred North


McLuhan—Kicking the Cigarette Machine

Marshall McLuhan "The Corpse as Still Life" pp. 104-106 in The Mechanical Bride (2002 Gingko Press edition) [orig. 1951] A generation later Edgar Allan Poe hit upon this principle of "reconstruction," or reasoning backwards, and made of it the basic technique of crime fiction and symbolist poetry alike. Instead of developing a narrative straight forward, inventing scenes, characters, and description as he proceeded, in the Sir Walter Scott manner, Poe said: "I prefer commencing with the consider...
Tags: Art, Edgar Allan Poe, Communication, David, Jazz, Bob, Poe, Bfa, Walter Scott, Julia, State University, Marshall McLuhan, Eliot, Taleb, McLuhan, Stefan Kac