Posts filtered by tags: Substantive Law: Foreign Law[x]


 

Refugee Law & Climate Change

Kiribati is a small island nation that may soon be gone. It is forecasted to be the first nation to become a victim of climate change and all of its citizens will be forced, involuntarily, to find another home. In an unprecedented decision, the UN Human Rights Commission ruled that a citizen of Kiribati, Mr. Ioane Teitioto, shall not be deported by New Zealand due to threats related to climate change. This decision is the first in a sea of change, I believe, that will lead to a significant expan...
Tags: Asia, Usa, Law, Canada, United Nations, New Zealand, Parliament, UNHCR, Human Rights Watch, Haiti, Kiribati, Peter, Immigration and Refugee Board, UN Human Rights Committee, Ontario Bar Association, Justice Issues


Unexpected Events, International Trade, and Contractual Obligations

In a globalized economy, unexpected events on the other side of the world can easily have direct economic impacts on the Canadian economy. Complex supply chains and strategic imports can be quickly disrupted by political, social, or medical issues. One contemporary example would be with the coronavirus emerging in China. The China Council for The Promotion of International Trade (CCPIT), which was founded in 1952, and is responsible for developing business cooperation and exchange with other cou...
Tags: Apple, Law, China, Court, Canada, Huawei, Alberta, Ontario, Supreme Court of Canada, Theroux, China Council, Substantive Law: Judicial Decisions, Grosse, Alberta Court of Appeal, Substantive Law: Foreign Law, English High Court of Justice


GDPR Guidelines for Canadian Business

The new EU GDPR privacy rules can apply to businesses outside of the EU that provide goods and services to EU data subjects. It is important for businesses outside of the EU to know when they are subject to the GDPR, as penalties for non-compliance are significant. An occasional sale to someone in the EU probably won’t be an issue – but what will?   The European Data Protection Board just released for public consultation draft guidelines on when the GDPR applies to those without a presence in t...
Tags: Law, Eu, Gdpr, Substantive Law: Foreign Law, European Data Protection Board


Empirical Analysis of What to Expect From Kavanaugh’s First Term on U.S. Supreme Court

Now that the very messy and nasty nomination process for US Supreme Court Justice for Brett Kavanaugh has ended, many observers are wondering what kind of judge he will be. SCOTUSblog, the American blog devoted to all things relating to the United States Supreme Court, has published a statistics-based article on What to expect from Kavanaugh’s first term: The tense waiting is now over as Justice Brett Kavanaugh was confirmed to the Supreme Court on October 6, 2018. One of the big stories about K...
Tags: Supreme Court, Law, Senate, U S Supreme Court, United States Supreme Court, Clarence Thomas, Kavanaugh, US Supreme Court Justice, Justice Issues, Brett Kavanaugh, Substantive Law: Foreign Law


Resources on US Supreme Court Nominee Brett M. Kavanaugh

Earlier this week, American President Trump nominated Brett M. Kavanaugh from the Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia to take the place of Justice Anthony Kennedy who will be retiring as of the end of this month. Who is Kavanaugh? There are plenty of resources to figure that out. The Library of Congress in Washington has published a page with resources about the nominee. The page includes links to articles and books by and about the nominee, to cases decided by him, to Congressional ma...
Tags: Supreme Court, Law, Washington, United States, Library Of Congress, US supreme court, Congressional, Anthony Kennedy, Kavanaugh, Justice Issues, Brett Kavanaugh, Brett M Kavanaugh, Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia, Legal Information: Libraries & Research, Substantive Law: Foreign Law, American President Trump


Draft OPC Position on Online Reputation and Public Consultation

On Friday, January 26, 2018, the Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada (OPC) released a draft of their position regarding online reputation and on how Canadians can better protect their online privacy and rights. The draft report is the result of a 2016 consultation on online reputations. Through this consultation, the OPC was soliciting input from interested stakeholders about new and innovative ways to protect reputational privacy. Reputation and Privacy is one of the OPC’s four strateg...
Tags: Technology, Law, Miscellaneous, Eu, European Union, Search Engines, Canada, Right To Be Forgotten, Parliament, Search Results, Federal Court, Public Interest, Google Microsoft, OPC, PIPEDA, Office of the Privacy Commissioner of Canada


Minorities Given Preferential Access to Cannabis Business Licenses Under D.C. Law

The Council of the District of Columbia has passed a law which gives minority-owned companies preferential access to cannabis business licenses. The emergency  modifies a section of the Legalization of Marijuana for Medical Treatment Initiative of 1999 to provide that that “a certified business enterprise (as defined in the Small, Local, and Disadvantaged Business Enterprise and Development and Assistance Act of 2005) shall be awarded a preference equal to 20 points or 7.5 percent of the availa...
Tags: Law, Canada, Anacostia River, Robert White, Substantive Law: Legislation, Substantive Law: Foreign Law, Council of the District of Columbia


Privacy Lessons From the Intimate of Things

The Internet is already everywhere, but we expect it to penetrate our lives even further, interacting with all of the devices, infrastructure, and environment around us. This phenomenon is known as the “Internet of Things” (IoT), described in 2014 by Jacob Morgan in Forbes as follows, Simply put, this is the concept of basically connecting any device with an on and off switch to the Internet (and/or to each other). This includes everything from cellphones, coffee makers, washing machines, headph...
Tags: Technology, Law, Toronto, Canada, Forbes, Daniel Burrus, Northern District of Illinois, Jacob Morgan, Substantive Law: Foreign Law, David Brown of BakerHostetler


EFF Publishes New Guide to Mitigating Digital Privacy Risks at US Border

If you care about solicitor-client privilege, travel to the US and use computing technology, then read this: By its own admission, US border protection conducted five-times as many electronic media searches in a single year—4,764 in 2015 to 23,877 in 2016. Yup. That’s 500% more cause for anyone travelling to the US to be concerned. Should Canadian lawyers be cautious too? Yes. America’s digital rights sentinel, Electronic Frontier Foundation, just released its 2017 reboot to its guide for mitiga...
Tags: Law, US, Chromebook, CBP, Electronic Frontier Foundation, Trump, Citrix, Electronic Frontier Foundation EFF, Justice Issues, Technology: Office Technology, Nate Russell, Substantive Law: Foreign Law, Mitigating Digital Privacy Risks