Posts filtered by tags: Syndication[x]


 

This tiny flashing kit can break your bad online security habits

The number of cyber attacks is estimated to have risen by 67% over the last five years, with the majority of these data breaches being traced back to human error. The potential risks of such attacks are vast and can have a serious impact on both organizations and individuals. But protecting ourselves against cyber security threats can be extremely complicated. Not only is the technology we use on a daily basis getting more complex, but attackers are constantly finding new ways to bypass security...
Tags: Security, Syndication, Tech


Fake Facebook accounts are influencing African elections

Facebook has issued a statement on how it removed fake accounts originating from Israel that ran Facebook Pages, Groups and Instagram accounts that carried false information looking to influence elections in several African countries. This forms part of Facebook looking to redeem itself and act proactively in its fight against having its platforms used to spread fake news, especially politically motivated fake news. In its statement, Facebook has said that it noticed “co-ordinated inauthentic be...
Tags: Africa, Business, Facebook, Politics, Syndication, World


If you lose a body part, other bits get a sensory boost – thank you, brain

When you wake up in the middle of the night in total darkness, it can feel as if you have auditory superpowers. Suddenly, you can hear floorboards creak storeys below and the softest rustle of foxes destroying the bins outside, once again. Indeed, it is common wisdom that when you lose one sense, the remaining senses heighten. Research with people experiencing long-term sensory deprivation, such as blindness or deafness, appears to support this notion. People born without sight can indeed feel a...
Tags: Startups, Science, World, Syndication


Kenya is allegedly selling citizen data to highest corporate bidder

According to Dr. Roselyn K. Akombe, Chief of Policy Planning and Guidance at the United Nations and ex-commissioner of Kenya’s Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC), the country’s government is going to sell all the citizen data collected through the Huduma Namba exercise to the highest bidder. Her statement came after President Uhuru Kenyatta extended the deadline for Huduma Namba registration by another week. Kenya’s Huduma Namba initiative, which the government has stated is ...
Tags: Security, Startups, Politics, Africa, Tech, World, United Nations, Kenya, Uhuru Kenyatta, Syndication, Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission, Roselyn K Akombe, Huduma Namba


Research reveals surprising relationship between climate change and fertility rate

Climate change will shape every aspect of human life – often in complex ways. Take the question of deciding how many children to have, for example. A new analysis suggests that climate change could increase fertility rates in tropical countries, in turn magnifying the impacts of climate change on those countries and widening the gap between wealthy and poorer nations. In the study, researchers built a model that combined standard economic theory with data on how climate change is likely to affec...
Tags: Startups, Science, World, Syndication


Listen, parents, here are 3 reasons you shouldn’t use child tracking apps

The use of self-tracking and personal surveillance technologies has grown considerably over the last decade. There are now apps to monitor people’s movement, health, mindfulness, sleep, eating habits and even sexual activity. Some of the more thorny problems arise from apps designed to track others, like those made for parents to track their kids. For example, there are specific apps that allow parents to monitor their child’s GPS location, who they call, what they text, which apps they use, wha...
Tags: Startups, Apps, Social Media, Tech, World, Syndication


Freshness sensors for milk could dramatically reduce waste

Researchers have developed a new technique that can pinpoint, in real-time, the moment at which milk spoils inside a carton. In their new study, published in the journal Food Control, they suggest that if their invention is integrated into the caps of milk containers, it could one day replace less-accurate sell-by-dates – and save a huge quantity of milk from being wasted every year. Milk goes off because of microbial growth that occurs over time, emitting increasing amounts of volatile organic ...
Tags: Startups, Tech, Syndication


New analysis of ‘moonquakes’ indicates the moon isn’t dead

We tend to think of the moon as the archetypal “dead” world. Not only is there no life, almost all its volcanic activity died out billions of years ago. Even the youngest lunar lava is old enough to have become scarred by numerous impact craters that have been collected over the aeons as cosmic debris crashed into the ground. Hints that the moon is not quite geologically dead though have been around since the Apollo era, 50 years ago. Apollo missions 12, 14, 15 and 16 left working “moonquake det...
Tags: Startups, Space, Science, Syndication


Here’s how we can change the Earth’s orbit to escape the expanding sun

In the Chinese science fiction film The Wandering Earth, recently released on Netflix, humanity attempts to change the Earth’s orbit using enormous thrusters in order to escape the expanding sun – and prevent a collision with Jupiter. The scenario may one day come true. In five billion years, the sun will run out of fuel and expand, most likely engulfing the Earth. A more immediate threat is a global warming apocalypse. Moving the Earth to a wider orbit could be a solution – and it is possible i...
Tags: Startups, Space, Science, Tech, Earth, World, Netflix, Jupiter, Syndication


Why this geneticist says we should stop human evolution

Measles cases in the US have hit a 25-year high, with 78 new infections in the past week alone. In a sign of the times, a cruise ship with hundreds of Scientologists on board was quarantined in St Lucia after one passenger was diagnosed with the disease. It’s the sort of news you can expect when parents stop vaccinating their children, which many did from the 1990s onwards for fear that scientists were foisting remedies on them that were more dangerous than the diseases themselves. As society ha...
Tags: Startups, Science, US, World, St Lucia, Syndication


South African voters fear mobile political campaigns will steal their personal info

Mobile technology will arguably go down in history as the most successful innovation of our lifetime. Mobile devices, especially phones, are ubiquitous in large parts of the world. On the African continent, the rates of mobile phone ownership and access are rising exponentially. Many organisations have recognized the opportunities this presents. Political parties are no exception. The 2008 election in the United States is widely regarded as a tipping point for the use of mobile devices in politi...
Tags: Startups, Politics, Africa, Tech, World, United States, Syndication


Driverless cars are years away, but self-driving forklifts have arrived

For several years, executives of tech and automobile companies have been promising that fully autonomous vehicles will soon become a common sights in streets and roads. But we’re well into 2019, and self-driving cars are still making stupid mistakes. In many ways, the short history of self-driving cars is reminiscent of the early decades of artificial intelligence research. Scientists constantly promised that human-level AI (or artificial general intelligence) was just around the corner. But as ...
Tags: Startups, Business, Cars, Tech, Artificial Intelligence, Syndication


6 surprising ways robots (and their anuses) are helping people live and work

How many times in the past week do you think your life was affected by a robot? Unless you have a robot vacuum cleaner, you might say that robots had no real impact on your life. But you’re wrong. Let’s take a look at some of the ways robots are being used right now but that you probably have no idea about. So what is a robot? Before we start, we need to define what actually is a robot. There is no official definition of what constitutes a robot, but many roboticists (like me) consider it to be ...
Tags: Startups, Tech, Robots, Insider, Syndication


Microalgae could be the future of sustainable farming

You might not be able to stomach soybeans for breakfast, lunch and dinner, but the animals you eat do. Cultivation of the staple crop takes up an area five times the size of the UK, and 85% of that area is used for animal feed. Thanks to projected rapid growth in both world population and in the meat-eating global middle class, demand for soybean is set to grow 80% by 2050 – more than any other staple crop. With arable land at a premium, our desire for animal products is already responsible for ...
Tags: Startups, Business, UK, Tech, World, Syndication


Nuking asteroids could save the Earth — but we need to make it legal first

The schlocky 1998 Bruce Willis movie Armageddon was the highest grossing film of that year. The blockbuster saw a master oil driller (Willis) and an unlikely crew of misfits place a nuclear bomb inside a giant asteroid heading for Earth, blow it up – and save humanity. Armageddon isn’t exactly a documentary: it’s packed full of sci-fi nonsense. But, 20 years on, its basic plot – of using a nuclear explosion to avert a cataclysmic asteroid collision – doesn’t seem quite as silly as it did at the ...
Tags: Startups, Space, Politics, Science, Syndication


The Y chromosome is disappearing – so what will happen to men?

The Y chromosome may be a symbol of masculinity, but it is becoming increasingly clear that it is anything but strong and enduring. Although it carries the “master switch” gene, SRY, that determines whether an embryo will develop as male (XY) or female (XX), it contains very few other genes and is the only chromosome not necessary for life. Women, after all, manage just fine without one. What’s more, the Y chromosome has degenerated rapidly, leaving females with two perfectly normal X chromosome...
Tags: Startups, Science, Tech, Syndication


How did the moon end up where it is?

Nearly 50 years since man first walked on the moon, the human race is once more pushing forward with attempts to land on the Earth’s satellite. This year alone, China has landed a robotic spacecraft on the far side of the moon, while India is close to landing a lunar vehicle, and Israel continues its mission to touch down on the surface, despite the crash of its recent venture. NASA meanwhile has announced it wants to send astronauts to the moon’s south pole by 2024. But while these missions see...
Tags: Startups, Space, Syndication


Oops! Scientists accidentally create new material that makes batteries charge much faster

Some of the most famous scientific discoveries happened by accident. From Teflon and the microwave oven to penicillin, scientists trying to solve a problem sometimes find unexpected things. This is exactly how we created phosphorene nanoribbons – a material made from one of the universe’s basic building blocks, but that has the potential to revolutionize a wide range of technologies. We’d been trying to separate layers of phosphorus crystals into two-dimensional sheets. Instead, our technique cr...
Tags: Startups, Science, Tech, Syndication


This cool gas technology could kill 99.9% of deadly germs in the air

You can live without food for three weeks and without water for up to three days. But you can’t live without air for more than three short minutes. It’s not just the abundance of air that matters – the quality is essential, too. Unfortunately, air can be contaminated with dangerous germs known as airborne pathogens, such as bacteria and viruses. Airborne diseases are very easily transmitted, and can result in respiratory illness that can be life threatening. It’s therefore no wonder that outbrea...
Tags: Startups, Science, Tech, Syndication


Study: Biodegradable bags aren’t as biodegradable as you first thought

The idea of a “biodegradable” plastic suggests a material that would degrade to little or nothing over a period of time, posing less of a hazard to wildlife and the environment. This is the sort of claim often made by plastic manufacturers, yet recent research has revealed supposedly biodegradable plastic bags still intact after three years spent either at sea or buried underground. So un-degraded were these bags that they were still able to hold more than two kilos of shopping. The study’s auth...
Tags: Startups, Science, Richard Thompson, Syndication, University of Plymouth, Imogen Napper


Here’s how the Earth got so wet, according to scientists

Water is essential for life on Earth and is one of our most precious natural resources. But considering how our planet formed, it is quite surprising how much water we still have. The Earth aggregated from a cloud of gas and dust – a protoplanetary disk – and was incandescently hot for the first few million years. Its surface was kept molten by impacts from comets and asteroids. Earth’s interior was also (and still is) kept liquid by a combination of gravitational heating and the decay of radioa...
Tags: Startups, Science, Earth, Syndication


Africa’s mobile-based healthcare initiatives need regulatory and community support – not just funding

As a community health worker tasked with tracking infant vaccinations in Kenya, Collince Oluoch was overwhelmed by the burdens of the job. He encountered mothers with no record of their children’s vaccinations, caregivers who could not remember clinic visits and colleagues who fudged figures. “Is there not a better way to track this vital health information?” he wondered. Technological advancements such as mHealth – the use of mobile and wireless technologies including mobile phones to support h...
Tags: Startups, Business, Africa, Tech, World, Kenya, Sub Saharan Africa, Syndication, Collince Oluoch


Is there a sustainable future for the veggie burger?

Whole grains, legumes, and vegetables enjoyed one year at the top of the burger heap. In 2015, “the best burger of the year,” as declared by GQ, was from New York City’s Superiority Burger, a tiny vegetarian joint run by former upscale pastry chef Brooks Headley. The recipe, per the restaurant’s 2018 cookbook, includes red quinoa, yellow onions, chickpeas, walnuts, carrots, potato starch, and other general pantry items. In 2016, the Silicon Valley-based Impossible Burger made its restaurant debu...
Tags: Startups, Business, New York City, World, Silicon Valley, Gq, Chang, David Chang, Brooks Headley, Momofuku Nishi, Syndication, Impossible Burger


Study: More electric cars could help us breathe easier

Electric vehicles have a small but fast-growing share of the car market. This switch from the gas-powered internal combustion engine to battery-powered electric propulsion is expected to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. But how will it affect other emissions related to air quality? A new analysis published in Atmospheric Environment delves into that question. Researchers behind the study consider the effects of the electricity source used to charge them in addition to EV market share. Both these...
Tags: Startups, Tech, Syndication


Here’s how we can make STEM classes more accessible to students in rural America

More than ever before, there is a high demand in the workforce for an increased emphasis on education in mathematics and sciences for school-age students. After all, two-thirds of all available jobs will require postsecondary critical thinking and problem-solving skills that are obtained in math and science classes by 2020. To best serve the younger generation who will soon enter the workforce, STEM education should be available in every school. The areas of greatest concern lie in rural America...
Tags: Startups, Science, America, Tech, Syndication


Here are the 7 requirements for building ethical AI, according to the EU commission

In October, Amazon had to discontinue an artificial intelligence–powered recruiting tool after it discovered the system was biased against female applicants. In 2016, a ProPublica investigation revealed a recidivism assessment tool that used machine learning was biased against black defendants. More recently, the US Department of Housing and Urban Development sued Facebook because its ad-serving algorithms enabled advertisers to discriminate based on characteristics like gender and race. And Goo...
Tags: Google, Amazon, Startups, Facebook, Business, Department Of Defense, Eu, World, Artificial Intelligence, US Department of Housing and Urban Development, Syndication


The digital farming revolution will cost workers their power, dignity, and possibly their jobs

There’s a lot of talk about digital technology and smart cities, but what about smart farms? Many of us still have a romantic view of farmers surveying rolling hills and farm kids cuddling calves, but our food in Canada increasingly comes from industrial-scale factory farms and vast glass and steel forests of greenhouses. While the social and environmental consequences of agri-food industrialization are fairly well understood, issues around digital technology are now just emerging. Yet, technolo...
Tags: Startups, Business, Politics, Tech, Canada, Syndication


What’s behind the curious serenading of cybercriminals in Nigerian hip-hop?

Singers use artistic conventions to construct marketable music personas. However, that’s not the full picture. In the US, for example, most American hip-hop and rap songs are also a reflection of the artistes’ living experiences and social communities. These mainly involve gang violence, street hustling and thug life. The late rapper, Notorious B.I.G., summarized a part of this succinctly in his song “Juicy”: “Yea, this album is dedicated to all the teachers that told me I’d never amount to noth...
Tags: Startups, Music, Africa, US, World, Syndication


The SETI screensaver shows us what the internet could’ve been

When I was twelve years old, I became obsessed with a screen saver. The screen saver pictured above, to be precise; you can watch its full glory here. It had multicolored lines that rose up inside a frame, like a kind of three-dimensional bar graph, and a whole lot of incomprehensible text and numbers that whizzed around above. My parents were slow to bring new technology into our home, justifiably cautious about both the financial outlay and its effect on our ability to do our homework. As a re...
Tags: Startups, Space, Science, Tech, Syndication


Here’s why privately-owned cities are a terrible idea

Over the last five years, something strange has happened at the eastern edge of Karachi, the crowded megalopolis in southern Pakistan. From scratch, a new city has appeared, complete with its own smooth asphalt highways, schools, hospitals, housing options ranging from modest apartment blocks to posh farmhouses — and, of course, an imitation Eiffel Tower. This is Bahria Town Karachi, an ambitious housing development ultimately planned to cover more than 45,000 acres of land — which is about the ...
Tags: Startups, Business, Politics, World, Syndication