Posts filtered by tags: Ted Mills[x]


 

The Case for Why Captain Beefheart’s Awful Sounding Album, Trout Mask Replica, Is a True Masterpiece

I’ve had Trout Mask Replica in my collection for years. I can’t say I regularly pull it out to give it a listen, but I know I’d never get rid of it. It’s a sometimes impenetrable slab of genius, wrought from endless sessions and then a short burst of recording, led by a man who couldn’t read music, was prone to fits of violent anger, but dammit knew what he wanted. (And Zappa produced.) When I learned later that the house where a lot of this went down was located in the hills behind the ...
Tags: Google, Music, College, America, Ornette Coleman, Vox, Vermont, Wolf, Tom, Facebook Twitter, Dylan, Zappa, Woodland Hills, KCRW, Joshua Tree, Beefheart


Watch an Animated Score for Steve Reich’s Minimalist Piece “Clapping Music“–and Try Your Hardest to Follow Along

Steve Reich’s Clapping Music is one of the simplest scores of modern classical music, and as you might soon find out, one of the most difficult to perform. Written in 1972 while on a European tour and after a night of mediocre flamenco, Clapping Music is for two players. One claps a steady rhythm (technically an African Bell Rhythm). A second performer claps in unison in the same pattern for eight bars. At the end of the eighth bar, the second performer goes out of sync for one eighth no...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Steve Reich, Reich, Facebook Twitter, KCRW, Ted Mills, London Sinfonietta, Anne Teresa, Reed Phase, Keersmaeker Asked


Hear Patti Smith’s New Work With The Soundwalk Collective, a Tribute to the Avant-Garde Poet Antonin Artaud

The Soundwalk Collective has made music art out of found sounds since 2004. They recorded 2012’s Medea while traversing the Black Sea and fishing for sounds using a scanner and high powered aerial antennas; 2014’s Last Beat used contact microphones on the architecture of a music club to collect vibrations instead of music; 2017’s Before Music There Is Blood collaged deep echoing recordings of classical music played in various halls. This time, in their upcoming The Peyote Dance, they hav...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Mexico, France, Russia, India, Paris, Ethiopia, Patti Smith, Smith, Black Sea, Ibiza, Eastern Europe, French Guiana, Nico


Hear Underground 12, the Earliest Known Case of Musicians Recording While Under the Influence of LSD (1966)

Music and LSD: after “Tomorrow Never Knows” and Sgt. Pepper, we knew what an acid trip should sound like. Other folks needed to know more. Somewhere in Los Angeles in 1966 a group of musicians were dosing and recording while tripping. The resulting recording--credited to “Underground 12” and considered the earliest known case of musicians recording while under the influence of LSD--was only available,  as the legend goes, by mail order-- you can see a copy of it here on discogs , a plain...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Los Angeles, World, Bob, Facebook Twitter, Zappa, Morristown New Jersey, KCRW, Madrigal, Ted Mills, Bob Reed, Huntington Park First Savings, Lysergia, Patrick Lundborg


A Six-Hour Time-Stretched Version of Brian Eno’s Music For Airports: Meditate, Relax, Study

Writing in his 1995 diary about his seminal ambient album Music for Airports, Eno remembered his initial thoughts going into it: “I want to make a kind of music that prepares you for dying--that doesn’t get all bright and cheerful and pretend you’re not a little apprehensive, but which makes you say to yourself, ‘Actually, it’s not that big a deal if I die.’” Created in 1978 from seconds-long tape loops from a much longer improv session with musicians including Robert Wyatt, Music for Ai...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Liverpool, Brian Eno, Derek Jarman, London City Airport, Eno, Facebook Twitter, KCRW, Robert Wyatt, Ted Mills, La Guardia New York, Brussels Holland, San Diego International Writing, KCET Alex Zaragoza


The Sex Pistols’ Sid Vicious Sings Frank Sinatra’s “My Way”: Is Nothing Sacred?

In the great garden of forking paths and alternative timelines there are two other versions of The Great Rock n’ Roll Swindle that Julian Temple never directed. One would have been directed by Graham Chapman of Monty Python fame, but “he behaved gloriously badly to Malcolm (McLaren)” according to John Lydon many years later. The other was to be written by film critic Roger Ebert and directed by buxom beauty lover Russ Meyer (who Lydon called "shabby” and “a senile old git.”) But you do h...
Tags: Google, Facebook, Music, UK, College, West, Roger Ebert, Paris, Monty Python, Mclaren, Frank Sinatra, Nancy, Martin Scorsese, Julien Temple, Facebook Twitter, Rolling Stones


The Real Locations of Ukiyo-e, Historic Japanese Woodblock Prints, Plotted on a Google Map

The undisputed last great master of ukiyo-e was Utagawa Hiroshige. He is best known for the many series he created of bucolic landscapes, which offered collectors a chance to see parts of Japan they might never reach. The Japan of his early 19th century work holds a special place in Japanese hearts--a final look at an isolated and beautiful country just before the opening up of the ports to the West and, with it, industrialization. Apart from Mount Fuji, the locations that Hiroshige drew have l...
Tags: Google, Art, Japan, College, History, Tokyo, Kyoto, George, DEWA, Facebook Twitter, KCRW, Mount Fuji, Kanazawa, Google Map, Ted Mills, Hiroshige


Visualizing the Bass Playing Style of Motown’s Iconic Bassist James Jamerson: “Ain’t No Mountain High Enough,” “For Once in My Life” & More

As part of Motown’s Funk Brothers house band, James Jamerson was the bubbling bass player behind hundreds of hit records from Stevie Wonder, Marvin Gaye, The Supremes, Martha and the Vandellas, and plenty more. His licks duck and dive and weave like Ali but never get in the way of the melody or the rest of the band. Paul McCartney was an early fan, but for the general public, Jamerson was not a household name for decades--Motown never listed the Wrecking Crew in its credits--until much l...
Tags: Google, Music, Youtube, College, Paul Mccartney, Marvin Gaye, Mccartney, Ali, Scott, Facebook Twitter, Motown, KCRW, Vandellas, Ted Mills, Jamerson, James Jamerson


A Virtual Tour of Every Place Referenced in The Beatles’ Lyrics: In 12 Minutes, Travel 25,000 Miles Across England, France, Russia, India & the US

Ach, the wonders and the blunders of the Internet. The wonder: Vanity Fair--lovely magazine, a bit too many stories about the royals and billionaires though--has the budget and the wherewithal to commission this video. It’s a 12 minute ride around the world using Google Maps, touching down to show locations mentioned in the Beatles lyrics, from Liverpool to the Black Mountain Hills of Dakota to Moscow, where the balalaikas are always ringing out. The blunder: it’s laced with inaccuracies...
Tags: Google, Music, London, Youtube, College, France, Scotland, India, John Lennon, US, George Harrison, America, Liverpool, Southampton, Paul Mccartney, Moscow


The Art of Creating Special Effects in Silent Movies: Ingenuity Before the Age of CGI

If anyone tries to claim that modern day movies have too many special effects remind them of this. Films have always used special effects to trick the audience, and we’re just using new variations of tools from a century ago. In fact, right from the beginning, creators like Georges Méliès were pushing the boundaries of celluloid and 24 frames per second like the showmen and magicians they were. By the time we get to the silent comedians as seen in our above video, technology had advanced...
Tags: Google, Film, College, Los Angeles, Jackie Chan, Peter Jackson, Charlie Chaplin, Keaton, Facebook Twitter, Lloyd, Buster Keaton, KCRW, Gandalf, Georges Méliès, Ted Mills, Harold Lloyd


Look How Young They Are!: The Beastie Boys Performing Live Their Very First Hit, “Cooky Puss” (1983)

Would you look at this video? Here we have the original line-up of the Beastie Boys (when they had a fourth, female member, Kate Schellenbach) playing a Christmas-time gig in 1983. And you just wanna scream: LOOK HOW YOUNG THEY ARE! Adam Yauch is probably 17 at the time, Michael Diamond younger, and Adam Horowitz is younger still, and they are plainly enjoying themselves while also being a bit nervous and unsure. (Ad-Rock blanches when he has to brag about the size of his member, while A...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Jackson, Henry Rollins, Facebook Twitter, KCRW, HOROWITZ, Malcolm McLaren, Adam Horowitz, Adam Yauch, Ted Mills, Carvel, The Beastie Boys, Michael Diamond, Tom Carvel


Guillermo del Toro Names Spielberg’s Catch Me If You Can the Most Underrated Great Movie of All Time

Director Guillermo del Toro, as one Twitter wag put it recently, is the kind of film friend we’d all love to have--a great conversationalist, a good listener, a fan at heart, and an encyclopedic knowledge of the form. And while it’s not rare to hear him praise Steven Spielberg, this recent Twitter post most people by surprise: Catch Me If You Can is honestly a film I haven’t thought about since I watched it in the theaters. That’s not to say it was bad--it was an enjoyable romp with Le...
Tags: Google, Film, College, Orson Welles, Tom Hanks, Guillermo Del Toro, Leonardo Dicaprio, Kubrick, Amy Adams, Spielberg, John Williams, Steven Spielberg, Martin Scorsese, Indiewire, Toro, Facebook Twitter


Buckminster Fuller Documented His Life Every 15 Minutes, from 1920 Until 1983

If you've heard of Buckminster Fuller, you've almost certainly heard the word "Dymaxion." Despite its strong pre-Space Age redolence, the term has somehow remained compelling into the 21st century. But what does it mean? When Fuller, a self-described “comprehensive, anticipatory design scientist,” first invented a house meant practically to reinvent domestic living, Chicago's Marshall Field and Company department store put a model on display. The company "wanted a catchy label, so it hired a c...
Tags: Google, Design, College, History, Chicago, Architecture, Seoul, Stanford University, Facebook Twitter, Elizabeth Kolbert, Fuller, Buckminster Fuller, Colin Marshall, Ted Mills, Kolbert, Dymaxion Car House


Every Spider-Man Movie and TV Show Explained By Kevin Smith

Look, I’ve never been a fan of Kevin Smith’s ooooooov-rah, per se, but I will never criticize his ability to spin a bloody good yarn. He’s funny, engaging, charming, and knows his pop culture. WIRED also knows this, so when on the eve of the (apparently very good) Spider-verse movie, they called on Smith to sit down and run through every Spider-man Movie and TV Show and opinionate all over that mess. (And because Sony’s contract with the Marvel superhero is up, this might be a nice demar...
Tags: Google, College, New York City, Queens, Sony, Pbs, Stan Lee, Smith, Joan, Garfield, Kevin Smith, Lee, Facebook Twitter, Kevin, Electric Company, McGuire


David Byrne Curates a Playlist of Great Protest Songs Written Over the Past 60 Years: Stream Them Online

When you hear the words “protest song,” what do you see? Is it a folkie like Bob Dylan or Joan Baez delivering songs about injustice? Is it an earnest young thing with a guitar? Is it trapped in 1960s amber, while time has moved on to more ambiguity, more nihilism, more solipsism? British writers--and may we add amateur folksingers--Jonathan Luxmoore and Christine Ellis made this lament over two years ago in the pages of The Guardian, in an opinion piece entitled, “Not talkin' bout a revolution...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Iraq, America, James Brown, Bob Dylan, Associated Press, Killer Mike, Janelle Monae, David Byrne, Jeremy Corbyn, Joan Baez, Bakersfield, Facebook Twitter, Monáe


The Strange History of Smooth Jazz: The Music We All Know and Love … to Hate

It’s the most unloved and derided of music genres, but the history of Smooth Jazz is not as bad as you might think. In another chapter of Vox’s excellent Earworm series (see Chapter 1 here and Chapter 2 here), Estelle Caswell explores the rise and fall of this modern day elevator music and asks if it’s worth reconsidering. The undisputed star of smooth jazz has to be the “Songbird” himself, the frizzy-hair be-coifed Kenny G. (The only part of the video I took issue with is when one fan i...
Tags: Google, Music, Japan, College, Los Angeles, Broadway, John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Vox, Kenny G, Montgomery, Clinton, Benson, Wes Montgomery, Coltrane, Facebook Twitter


Watch Queen’s Dragtastic “I Want to Break Free” Video: It Was More Than America & MTV Could Handle (1984)

I remember the early part of 1984 when Queen’s “Radio Gaga,” their single from The Works album with a video that mixed in clips from Fritz Lang’s Metropolis, was played nearly every hour on MTV. Or it least it seemed that way. And then in April, the band released their follow-up single, “I Want to Break Free,” seen above. This is when things got weird for Queen stateside and where truth starts to split from rumor. In the fine tradition of British pantomime and Monty Python, the band appe...
Tags: Google, Music, College, America, Mtv, Royal Ballet, Queen, Monty Python, Claude Debussy, Brian May, Wayne, Facebook Twitter, KCRW, Freddie, Terry Gross, Roger Taylor


The Making of “Bohemian Rhapsody”: Take a Deep Dive Into the Iconic Song with Queen’s 2002 Mini Documentary

Despite being fraught with production difficulties, an absent director, and a critical quibbling over its sexuality politics, Bohemian Rhapsody, the biopic of Freddie Mercury and Queen, has been doing very well at the box office. And though it has thrust Queen’s music back into the spotlight, has it even really gone away? The song itself, the 6 minute epic “Bohemian Rhapsody,” was the top of the UK singles charts for nine weeks upon its release and hasn’t been forgotten since. It’s part ...
Tags: Google, Music, UK, College, Kanye West, Freddie Mercury, Axl Rose, Brian May, Facebook Twitter, KCRW, Roger Taylor, Elstree, Ted Mills, Justin Shirley Smith


At Folsom Prison: A Mini-Doc on Johnny Cash’s Historic & Career-Changing Concert

It was the opposite of superstar rock concerts, or even a sweaty, dark stage like that at CBGB’s in New York. But the dining hall at Folsom Prison was the setting for a concert that would give Johnny Cash, on the verge of a career collapse, a second chance on life. And it would become one of the unlikeliest venues in the history of country music. Nothing was the same after this unlikeliest of turnarounds. After the album recorded at this gig, Cash would be hurtled into superstardom. He’d...
Tags: Google, Music, New York, California, College, Cash, Bob Dylan, Times, Folsom, Reno, Los Angeles Times, Cbgb, Facebook Twitter, Johnny Cash, KCRW, Folsom Prison


A Database of Paper Airplane Designs: Hours of Fun for Kids & Adults Alike

Though we can trace the history of paper aircraft back 2000 years to the Chinese and their kites, and into the 19th century with the French and their imaginary airships, the origin of the modern paper airplane is shrouded in mystery. A San Diego Reader article placed the birth somewhere in 1910. By 1915, most American kids were already tormenting teachers. And Jack Northrup used paper models to work on aerodynamics at Lockheed in the 1930s, but even that doesn’t do much to explain how su...
Tags: Google, Design, College, Georgia, Nasa, San Diego, Lockheed, Facebook Twitter, KCRW, John Collins, Joe Ayoob, Ted Mills, Ayoob, Ken Blackburn, Jack Northrup, Technology University of Delft


Growing Up Surrounded by Books Has a Lasting Positive Effect on the Brain, Says a New Scientific Study

Image by George Redgrave, via Flickr Commons Somewhere in the annals of the internet--if this sprawling, near-sentient thing we call the internet actually has annals--there is a fine, fine quote by filmmaker John Waters: We need to make books cool again. If you go home with somebody and they don’t have books, don’t fuck them. Don’t let them explore you until they’ve explored the secret universes of books. Don’t let them connect with you until they’ve walked between the lines on the pages. Books...
Tags: Google, Books, College, China, Turkey, Norway, Australian National University, John Waters, Facebook Twitter, Social Science Research, KCRW, Waters, Ted Mills, Sikora, George Redgrave, Joanna Sikora


David Lynch Is Creating a Virtual Reality Experience for Twin Peaks

David Lynch and Mark Frosts Black Lodge/Red Room, the extra-dimensional space that is both an integral part of Twin Peaks and iconic in its set design, is a place most of us would not want to visit. Detective Dale Cooper got trapped there for 25 years and it was not pleasant. But that hasnt stopped fans from wanting to create that space any chance they get, whether as a bar or place to sing karaoke. And when the final episode of the second season showed the lodge was an endless series of rooms ...
Tags: Google, Video Games, College, New York City, David Lynch, Adweek, Briggs, Facebook Twitter, Lynch, KCRW, Dale Cooper, Ted Mills, Audrey Horne, Black Lodge, Mark Frosts Black Lodge Red Room, Glastonbury Grove


The Origins of the Death Growl in Metal Music

When Arab-Spanish Sephardi Jewish merchant Abraham ben Jacob first encountered the Vikings in Denmark, he had this to say: "Never before I have heard uglier songs than those of the Vikings in Slesvig. The growling sound coming from their throats reminds me of dogs howling, only more untamed." Now what Mr. ben Jacob actually heard we will never know, but the description does sound a lot like the “Death Growl” familiar to fans of death metal. (The appearance of Vikings and the preponderanc...
Tags: Google, Music, Youtube, College, Wikipedia, Bbc, Pink Floyd, Tom Waits, Denmark, John Peel, Vikings, Devil, Black Sabbath, Motorhead, Lemmy, Sepultura


Hear Brian Eno’s Ringtones Composed for Mobile Phones

In a Brian Eno interview from 2007, writer Gemma Winter reminded him of something she had read about him and ringtones: GM: I read an interview with you in Q magazine about seven years ago, and you were asked had you ever composed your own ringtone. You responded by saying you wouldn't be that sad! But you've just composed ringtones for Nokia - please explain. BE: Heh heh! At that time they were asking you to compose a piece of music, but you could only use those sounds. They would compo...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Nokia, Mobile Phones, Steve Reich, Brian Eno, Eno, Facebook Twitter, KCRW, Laraaji, Ted Mills, Jim Rockford, Gemma Winter, Sirocco Eno


Brian Eno Reveals His Favorite Film Soundtracks

Think of “interviewing Brian Eno” (listen to it here) like a piece of his generative music. Yes, the man has no problems talking and actually encourages it. But input the same old questions about those same four albums (you know them, right?) and you get the same old answers as output. Feed in a completely different subject--like his favorite film soundtracks--and lo and behold, a very intriguing 80 minutes follows. That’s what happened when Hugh Cornwell (lead vocalist of The Stranglers...
Tags: Google, Music, College, David Bowie, Elvis Presley, Brian, Miles Davis, Oklahoma, Brian Eno, Derek Jarman, Adam Curtis, Bush, Eno, Facebook Twitter, KCRW, Angelo Badalamenti


Hear Nico’s Pre-Velvets Recording, “I’m Not Sayin,” Backed by the Rolling Stones’ Brian Jones & Led Zeppelin’s Jimmy Page (1965)

For most of us, the Teutonic singer Nico has always been associated with the first Velvet Underground album and then a series of fascinating solo albums (often with Velvets connections) released during the ‘70s and ‘80s before her untimely death in 1988. The voice and the look are unmistakable, that far away stare, that detached, brooding and flat tone. It might also feel like she magically appeared from a cloud of smoke in 1967 New York City. But before she met Andy Warhol, the former t...
Tags: Google, Music, New York, College, New York City, Thames, Canary Wharf, Andy Warhol, Patti Smith, Jones, Oldham, La Dolce Vita, Page, Jimmy Page, Nico, Zeppelin


Watch the Sex Pistols Play a Gig on a Thames River Barge During the Queen’s Silver Jubilee, and Get Shut Down by the Cops (1977)

Getting your gig shut down by the cops is always excellent publicity--just ask the Beatles. But there’s a world of difference between the 1969 rooftop concert and this June 7, 1977 boat party to publicize the Sex Pistols’ second single “God Save the Queen.” It shows how quickly the hippie dream of the ‘60s had curdled into the grim economics of mid-‘70s London, where race riots and police brutality, along with numerous national strikes, had made the UK fertile ground for the birth of pun...
Tags: Google, Music, UK, England, London, College, Bbc, Punk, Manchester, Vivienne Westwood, Sex Pistols, Parliament, Mclaren, Savage, Elizabeth, Julien Temple


How Michael Jackson Wrote a Song: A Close Look at How the King of Pop Crafted “Don’t Stop ‘Til You Get Enough”

First of all, happy belated birthday to Evan Puschak, the man behind Nerdwriter and some of the best video essays on the web that we often feature here on Open Culture. He recently turned 30, and if you’re in your 20s that’s some elder statesman business. If you’re older, well, remember how you felt when you turned 30? Wouldn’t you want that youthful anxiety back? Anyway, Evan’s gift to us is this appreciation of Michael Jackson’s “Don’t Stop ‘Til You Get Enough,” the breakaway hit from ...
Tags: Google, Music, College, Jackson, Michael Jackson, Facebook Twitter, Evan, Evan Puschak, KCRW, Ted Mills, Puschak, Ethan Hein, Sammy Davis Jr Fred Astaire More Miles Davis, Ann Danielson


David Lynch Muses About the Magic of Cinema & Meditation in a New Abstract Short Film

One of the wonderful things about David Lynch is that, despite interviews, several documentaries on his creative process, plenty of behind-the-scenes footage of him directing, and the release of a whole memoir/biography told both subjectively *and* objectively...despite all that, the man is still an enigma. Even when he returned 25 years later to familiar ground with the third season of Twin Peaks, there was no sign of self-parody, and he delivered some of the most brilliant work of his ...
Tags: Google, Film, College, Stella Mccartney, David Lynch, Facebook Twitter, Lynch, Simmons, Mulholland, KCRW, Eraserhead, Ted Mills, Jennifer Lynch, Boxing Helena, Austin Lynch, Club Silencio


The Beach Party Film: A Short Appreciation of One of the Oddest Subgenres in Film History

Dallas, TX cinephile Andrew Saladino has a fabulous film critique channel called The Royal Ocean Film Society, which he’s been operating since 2016, following in the footsteps of Every Frame a Painting (RIP) and Press Play (RIP). In this recent essay, he turns his eye to the mostly forgotten and never particularly good “dead genre” known as the Beach Party film. You’ve probably seen one, or at least a parody of one, somewhere along the way--formulaic and harmless surf’n’fun films sold to...
Tags: Google, Hollywood, Film, College, Stevie Wonder, Marlon Brando, James Dean, Roger Corman, Dick Dale, Keaton, Facebook Twitter, Frankie, Buster Keaton, Annette Funicello, KCRW, Dallas TX