Posts filtered by tags: Terry Teachout[x]


 

Was Terry Teachout The Last Of The Conservative Arts Critics?

“For him, conservatism signaled a commitment to tradition, to persevering and building on past achievement. It was a conservatism of memory, not of grievance and spite. … With his death, this strain of conservatism seems not only rare but perhaps even extinct.” – The Nation
Tags: Art, Featured, Issues, Terry Teachout


Ted Gioia Remembers Terry Teachout

“I always appreciated that warmth and compassion, but again I was hardly surprised. I had experienced it myself.” – Ted Gioia
Tags: Art, People, Terry Teachout, Ted Gioia


Jon Podhoretz Remembers Terry Teachout

“Terry’s ability to bounce month to month from film noir to the crisis of the symphony orchestra to the talents of Robert Mitchum to the musicality of Nat King Cole to the ever-sticky problem of how and when and whether to separate an artist’s noxious views from his art were the ultimate testament…” – Commentary
Tags: Art, People, Terry, Terry Teachout, Robert Mitchum, Jon Podhoretz


"The best blogs are idiosyncratic, unmediated expressions of an individual sensibility, a notion which tends to make old-media executives squirm, so much so that many print-media publications refuse to let their employees blog."

Wrote Terry Teachout in 2006, quoted by me at the time, in "The very idea of an institutional blog is a contradiction in terms." I'm reading my old posts about Terry Teachout, because he has died. Read "Terry Teachout, Wall Street Journal Drama Critic, Dies at Age 65/Missouri-born author and musician wrote biographies of Louis Armstrong, Duke Ellington and H.L. Mencken" (WSJ). I had the pleasure of spending an evening with Terry Teachout when he came to Madison to see the play "Rembrandt's G...
Tags: Death, Law, America, Blogging, Brooklyn, Broadway, Wisconsin, Theater, Rembrandt, Madison, Dante, Miller, Terry Teachout, Teachout, Louis Armstrong Duke Ellington, Ann Althouse


AJBlogger And Wall Street Journal Theatre Critic Terry Teachout, 65

Very very sad to announce the death of one of ArtsJournal’s original and most prolific bloggers. – The Wall Street Journal
Tags: Art, Featured, People, Terry Teachout


Terry Teachout, 65

I regret to write that Terry Teachout, one of ArtsJournal’s original bloggers since 2003, has died unexpectedly at his home in New York at the age of 65. The Wall Street Journal, where Terry was the longtime theatre critic, has an I will write more about Terry in the days to come. He was a generous and valued friend. Though we spoke rarely, we had an active correspondence over the years and he was one of the hardest-working people I’ve ever known. He will be much missed. More later. D...
Tags: Art, New York, Terry, Wall Street Journal, Ajblogs, Terry Teachout


A question I wasn't asking, but I'd like to know.

Has anyone ever tracked down the very first use of the now-clichéd slowed-down "OOOOOH NOOOOO" in film? No guesses, please—I'm looking for an informed answer.— Terry Teachout (@TerryTeachout1) December 27, 2021 [Author: [email protected] (Ann Althouse)]
Tags: Movies, Law, Terry Teachout, Ann Althouse


Move on

A new episode of Three on the Aisle, the podcast in which Peter Marks, Elisabeth Vincentelli, and I talk about theater in America, is now available on line for listening or downloading. Here’s American Theatre’s “official” summary of the proceedings:  Once a month since September 2017, Terry Teachout of The Wall Street Journal; Elisabeth Vincentelli, contributor to The New York Times and The New Yorker; and Peter Marks of the Washington Post have gotten together to talk about what’s goi...
Tags: Art, Washington Post, America, New York Times, Stephen Sondheim, Wall Street Journal, Ajblogs, Terry Teachout, Peter Marks, Elisabeth Vincentelli, Peter Marks Elisabeth Vincentelli


"Most filmgoers under the age of sixty are puzzled by the scene in Mel Brooks’ Blazing Saddles in which Black Bart attempts to persuade the craven townspeople of Rock Ridge..."

"... to stand up to the evil Hedley Lamarr by telling them, 'You’d do it for Randolph Scott.' To this they respond in unison, 'Randolph Scott!' then doff their hats reverently—an accurate indication of how closely identified Scott was with the Western genre. He always played the same character, a lanky, dryly amusing cowboy with a Virginia accent who spoke only when spoken to and shot only when shot at, and you could take it for granted that he’d do the right thing in any given situation. If he’...
Tags: Hollywood, Movies, Law, Virginia, John Wayne, Mel Brooks, Scott, Roberts, Terry Teachout, Teachout, Pernell Roberts, Meade, Lee Marvin, Richard Boone, Budd Boetticher, Randolph Scott


Ibsen Was A Hugely Influential Playwright And His Ideas Permeate Still. But…

Terry Teachout writes that the ideas – groundbreaking and shocking in their times, are now so familiar that they’re boring. “To be sure, we live with their culture-changing consequences—we know them well—but the plays themselves too often come across as static, talky exercises in bourgeois-baiting, as smug as Shaw at his worst but without his compensating wit.” Commentary
Tags: Art, Theatre, Shaw, Ibsen, Terry Teachout, 04.19


Originality is overrated

Never thought I would start my first blog of 2019 with this controversial post title. When I first read the line in an old review by Terry Teachout in the Wall Street Journal, I immediately felt my hackles rise. (No, I am not even sure what a “hackle” is, and why they never seem to fall, only rise.) A firm believer in the strength and power of originality, I couldn’t understand how it could ever be overrated. Mr. Teachout then continued, “Even the most hackneyed-sounding plot can be made fresh ...
Tags: Business, Advertising, Marketing, Sales, Creativity, Ideas, Humor, Weddings, Wall Street Journal, Good Ideas, Terry Teachout, Teachout, Jay H Heyman, Father of the Bride


Big-House Grand Opera In The U.S. May Be Doomed: Terry Teachout

“Alas, it’s hard for me to see how the Met can realistically hope to reinvent itself other than by razing its superannuated theater and starting from scratch. Nor am I sanguine about the long-term prospects for, say, the Lyric Opera of Chicago, whose home is the 3,563-seat Civic Opera House and which was just shut down by an orchestra strike, or the San Francisco Opera, which performs in the 3,126-seat War Memorial Opera House. (The Vienna State Opera House, by way of comparison, has 2,220 seats...
Tags: Art, Music, Chicago, San Francisco Opera, Terry Teachout, Civic Opera House, Vienna State Opera House, 10.10.18


Van Gogh goes to the mall

As part of a Wall Street Journal column, Terry Teachout considers what it means to have 3D reproductions of Van Gogh paintings in the mall.
Tags: Art, Wall Street Journal, Van Gogh, Ajblogs, Terry Teachout, 09.21.18


JazzWax Turns 11!

Eleven years ago, JazzWax went live. Which means today is the site's 11th birthday. And on JazzWax's birthday, I get a day of rest. For those unfamiliar with the JazzWax story, the site was started on a dare. Terry Teachout, a dear friend, prolific author and the Wall Street Journal's drama critic, and I used to listen to jazz quarterly for years. One day in the summer of 2007, he challenged me to start a blog. I protested that I was too busy. He wouldn't hear of it, pointing out no one was bu...
Tags: Godaddy, Jazz, Terry, Terry Teachout, Marc Myers, JazzWax


"Adolf Hitler adored the Ninth Symphony. Musicians waiting for their deaths in Nazi concentration camps were ordered to play it..."

"... metaphorically twisting its closing call to universal brotherhood and joy into a terrifying, sneering parody of all that strives for light in a human soul. More than four decades later, Leonard Bernstein conducted several performances to celebrate the fall of the Berlin Wall, substituting the word 'freedom' for 'joy' in Friedrich Schiller’s 1785 poem to which Beethoven’s movement was set. And Emmanuel Macron chose this music as the backdrop for his victory speech after winning the French pr...
Tags: Europe, Law, Berlin Wall, Poetry, Beethoven, Hitler, Adolf Hitler, Emmanuel Macron, Leonard Bernstein, Friedrich Schiller, Terry Teachout, The Star, Ann Althouse, John Terauds


Daniel, Howard and Duke

In The Wall Street Journal this week, I interviewed French chef Daniel Boulud, owner of 13 restaurants, five of which are New York, including Daniel (go here). Chef talked about growing up on his family farm near Lyon in the late 1960s and early '70s. He also mentioned the food item he dreams about most but can't get it in the States. His most recent book is Letters to a Young Chef. Also in the WSJ, I interviewed Time Warner executive vice president Olaf Olafsson on living in Iceland as ...
Tags: Spotify, New York, Time Warner, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Jazz, Rio De Janeiro, Iceland, Terry, Louis Armstrong, Duke, Lyon, Wall Street Journal, WSJ, Billy, Daniel


"So much wasted time."

David Cassidy's last words.I was reminded of that by this tweet by Terry Teachout: A dying man contemplates his untouched bookshelf: https://t.co/P3mSadnziX pic.twitter.com/YNy2mB7Ssq — Terry Teachout (@terryteachout) November 25, 2017 ADDED: On publishing this post, I saw I'd written "his tweet" for "this tweet" and said out loud: "So many typos, so little editing" and realized that it seems that David Cassidy died without finishing a sentence. The usual pattern is "So much X, so little Y." I...
Tags: Death, Law, Time, Reading, David Cassidy, Terry Teachout, Ann Althouse


Before the play: A view from the second row.

Meade and I drove out to Spring Green last night to see the American Players Theater production of "A View From the Bridge." Here's what the Wall Street Journal theater critic, Terry Teachout, wrote about it a few days ago. Teachout called APT "America's finest classical theater festival, unrivaled for the unfailing excellence of its productions." Teachout hated a 2015 Broadway production of "A View From the Bridge" "flatulent exercise in Eurotrashy gimmickry" and this APT production "a master...
Tags: Photography, Law, America, Fish, Hunger, Brooklyn, Homosexuality, Italy, Philip Seymour Hoffman, Broadway, Theater, Mike Nichols, Eddie, Catherine, Christ, Arthur Miller


America's Best Classical Theatre Festival? It's In A Tiny Village In Wisconsin

Terry Teachout: "Surprisingly few people outside Wisconsin know of APT’s existence, yet it is America’s finest classical theater festival, unrivaled for the unfailing excellence of its productions. Nowhere else—not even in New York or Chicago—will you see such plays done more stylishly or excitingly."
Tags: Art, New York, Theatre, America, Chicago, Wisconsin, Terry Teachout, 09.01.17


Lemony, Jutta and Brett

In The Wall Street Journal this week, I interviewed acclaimed novelist and children's book author Lemony Snicket, the pen name of Daniel Handler (go here). In the interview, for my "House Call" column in the Mansion section, we talked about why Daniel lived in an attic growing up in San Francisco and why people today look at his house and think he's uptight (he's not). [Photo above from YouTube] Also in the WSJ, I interviewed novelist Diane Ackerman, author of The Zookeeper's Wife, for m...
Tags: England, New York, San Francisco, Bbc, Atlantic, Britain, Brooklyn, Selma, Harry Belafonte, Jazz, John, Mansion, Upper West Side, Terry, Louis Armstrong, Wall Street Journal


JazzWax Turns 10!

Today is JazzWax's 10th birthday. I started the blog in 2007 after my dear friend and author, playwright and Wall Street Journal drama critic Terry Teachout gave me a nudge. During one of our Saturday morning jazz listening sessions, he insisted I start a blog. I told him I was too busy. Terry said,, "Nonsense." So I took his dare and the rest is, well, history. So today, as I kick back, I hope my readers have enjoyed and appreciated the past 10 years. I know I have.          [Author: Marc ...
Tags: Jazz, Terry, Terry Teachout, Marc Myers, JazzWax


Terry Teachout Imagines A Theatre Season Of Plays By Women Playwrights (It Wasn't Hard)

I’ve conducted a thought experiment. If I were running a regional theater company and decided to devote an entire season to plays by women, which ones would I choose? Within five minutes, my imaginary season was planned. Not only did I make a special point of including two pre-1960 works that are now largely (if […]
Tags: Art, Theatre, Terry Teachout, 07.13.17


Theater Talk: The Critics Chime in on Their Favorite Shows of the Season

This week THEATER TALK presentsthe Season's-End Critics panel - with Peter Marks of The Washington Post, Terry Teachout of THE WALL Street Journal, Elisabeth Vincentelli of The New York Times amp The New Yorker, and Linda Winer of Newsday - discussing the notable plays of Spring 2017 on Broadway. Then, Tony winner Joel Greyjoins co-hosts Michael Riedel of the New York Post and Susan Haskins to talk about his revealing memoir, 'Master of Ceremonies' Flatiron Books. The episode also features a sur...
Tags: New York Post, Theatre, New York Times, The Washington Post, Tony, Michael Musto, Newsday, Terry Teachout, Michael Riedel, Susan Haskins, Peter Marks, Linda Winer, Theater Talk, Elisabeth Vincentelli, Joel Greyjoins


Sue, Bunny and Louis

In The Wall Street Journal this week, my "House Call" interview was with British comedian Eddie Izzard and focused on the trauma he went through as a child after his mother took ill (go here). Also, my interview with Mike Tyson for my "Playlist" column looked at MFSB's Love Is the Message and why the song is so special to him (go here). And finally, I wrote the Off Duty section's "Copy Cat" design column this weekend on what I lusted after during a recent trip to Miami (go here). A special t...
Tags: New York, Australia, New York Times, Moon, Jazz, Miami, Eddie Izzard, Mike Tyson, Richard, Louis Armstrong, Wall Street Journal, Joe, Louis, Richards, Greenwich Village, Richard Barone


Critics Rehash the Season, Joel Grey Stops by This Week's THEATER TALK

This week THEATER TALK presents Part Two of the Season's-End Critics panel - with Peter Marks of The Washington Post, Terry Teachout of THE WALL Street Journal, Elisabeth Vincentelli of The New York Times amp The New Yorker, and Linda Winer of Newsday - discussing the notable plays of Spring 2017 on Broadway. Then, Tony winner Joel Grey joins co-hosts Michael Riedel of the New York Post and Susan Haskins to talk about his revealing memoir, 'Master of Ceremonies' Flatiron Books. The episode also ...
Tags: New York Post, Theatre, New York Times, The Washington Post, Tony, Michael Musto, Newsday, Terry Teachout, Joel Grey, Michael Riedel, BWW News Desk, Susan Haskins, Peter Marks, Linda Winer, Elisabeth Vincentelli


Critics to Rehash the Season & Joel Grey to Stop by This Week's THEATER TALK

This week THEATER TALK presents Part Two of the Season's-End Critics panel - with Peter Marks of The Washington Post, Terry Teachout of THE WALL Street Journal, Elisabeth Vincentelli of The New York Times amp The New Yorker, and Linda Winer of Newsday - discussing the notable plays of Spring 2017 on Broadway. Then, Tony winner Joel Grey joins co-hosts Michael Riedel of the New York Post and Susan Haskins to talk about his revealing memoir, 'Master of Ceremonies' Flatiron Books. The episode also ...
Tags: New York Post, Theatre, New York Times, The Washington Post, Tony, Michael Musto, Newsday, Terry Teachout, Joel Grey, Michael Riedel, BWW News Desk, Susan Haskins, Peter Marks, Linda Winer, Elisabeth Vincentelli


Critics Marks, Teachout, Vincentelli and Winer Set for THEATER TALK's 'Season's-End' Episodes

Season's-End Critics, Part One - with Peter Marks of The Washington Post, Terry Teachout of the Wall Street Journal, Elisabeth Vincentelli of The New York Times amp The New Yorker, and Linda Winer of Newsday - features the venerable critics reviewing the past season and discussing theater coverage in the Digital Age. [Author: BWW News Desk]
Tags: Theatre, New York Times, The Washington Post, Newsday, Terry Teachout, Winer, BWW News Desk, Peter Marks, Linda Winer, Elisabeth Vincentelli, Teachout Vincentelli


Peggy Lee: Jan. 1945

When did Peggy Lee become Peggy Lee? Meaning, at what point in her recording career did she cross over from a straight reader of songs to someone who was keenly hip and aware of her sly seductive powers when delivering songs? Today, we're most familiar with latter Lee, the woman with the hourglass figure in the 1940s and '50s cooly in control of her facial features as she cast a spell on viewers by moving her eyes from left to right and singing with a powdery, bedroom delivery. As Terry Teachou...
Tags: Jazz, Frank Sinatra, Continental, Wilson, Nat King Cole, Sinatra, Lee, Capitol, Robinson, Peggy Lee, James Gavin, Barbour, Terry Teachout, Marc Myers, Billie Holiday, Buck Clayton


March linkfest

I’m generally skeptical of corporate-storytelling advice, but Andy Raskin’s “How to Design Your Company Story” is just wacky enough – its hypothetical company is called FairyGodmothers.com – to win me over.   * An illustrated guide to Republican metaphors for the Affordable Care Act, from goat to puzzle to house of sand.   * There’s going to be a sweary-face emoji. (Hat tip: Ben Zimmer.)   *   It’s been a short, strange trip for the slang word fleek, which burst on the scene in a 2014 V...
Tags: Science, Design, Writing, Ray Bradbury, Advertising, America, Story, Linguistics, Nazi, Words, Emoji, General Mills, Pluto, Trademark, John Kelly, Slang


Horace, Leon and Frank

Horace Parlan (1931-2017), a hard bop pianist who overcame a polio-stricken right hand to become one of the finest trio and solo pianists of his generation, died in Denmark on Feb. 23. He was 86 and had been ill for some time. I recently posted about Parlan here and here. Among Parlan's finest group recordings are the albums he recorded with Stanley Turrentine and Dexter Gordon. In tribute to Parlan, here's Gordon's Society Red, with Dexter Gordon (ts), Freddie Hubbard (tp), Horace Parlan (p),...
Tags: Germany, Jazz, Denmark, Frank Sinatra, Terry, Wall Street Journal, Marvin Gaye, WSJ, Leon, Frank, Tom, Albert, Gordon, David Newman, Yoshi, Hartford