Posts filtered by tags: UC San Francisco[x]


 

SFHN clinicians support the use of telehealth services for outpatient primary care

As state and federal authorities decide whether to continue reimbursing for telehealth services that were suddenly adopted last spring in response to the coronavirus pandemic, a new study out of UC San Francisco has found that clinicians in the San Francisco Health Network (SFHN) overwhelmingly support using these services for outpatient primary care and specialty care visits.
Tags: Health, UC San Francisco, San Francisco Health Network SFHN, SFHN


Pandemic-driven telehealth proves popular at safety net health system

As state and federal authorities decide whether to continue reimbursing for telehealth services that were suddenly adopted last spring in response to the coronavirus pandemic, a new study out of UC San Francisco has found that clinicians in the San Francisco Health Network (SFHN) overwhelmingly support using these services for outpatient primary care and specialty care visits.
Tags: Science, UC San Francisco, San Francisco Health Network SFHN


Pioneering neural recordings lay the groundwork for personalized Parkinson's treatments

Pioneering neural recordings in patients with Parkinson's disease by UC San Francisco scientists lays the groundwork for personalized brain stimulation to treat Parkinson's and other neurological disorders.
Tags: Health, Parkinson, UC San Francisco


Brain wave recordings reveal potential for individualized Parkinson's treatments

Pioneering neural recordings in patients with Parkinson's disease by UC San Francisco scientists lays the groundwork for personalized brain stimulation to treat Parkinson's and other neurological disorders.
Tags: Science, Parkinson, UC San Francisco


LA remembers Eli Broad, businessman, philanthropist, dead at 87

LOS ANGELES — Tributes were pouring in Saturday for businessman, philanthropist and art collector Eli Broad, who died Friday at the age of 87. Broad, who left an indelible imprint on Los Angeles’ cultural scene, died at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center following a long illness, according to Suzi Emmerling, spokeswoman for the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation. “As a businessman Eli saw around corners, as a philanthropist he saw the problems in the world and tried to fix them, as a citizen he saw the po...
Tags: Business, New York, Hollywood, News, California, La, Massachusetts, California News, Los Angeles, Sport, Soccer, United States, Harvard University, Obituaries, New York Times, Obituary


Which is better for developing immunity: COVID-19 vaccine or natural infection?

Debate has raged over which provides better protection against COVID-19 — natural infection or vaccine injection? “Sorry Dr Fauci and other fearmongers, new study shows vaccines and naturally acquired immunity DO effectively neutralize COVID variants. Good news for everyone but bureaucrats and petty tyrants!” tweeted a combative Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul in March. A large-scale study by UC Irvine researchers may definitively settle this debate. They found that, yes, natural infection provides prot...
Tags: Science, News, Congress, California, Sport, Public Health, Soccer, National Institutes of Health, Pfizer, Biden, Disneyland, Orange County, University Of California, UCI, Riverside, Johnson Johnson


Deaths rising in workers using methylene chloride paint strippers

Researchers and physicians from the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and UC San Francisco have found that deaths of workers using methylene chloride paint strippers are on the rise. The solvent is widely used in paint strippers, cleaners, adhesives and sealants.
Tags: Science, UC San Francisco, Occupational Safety and Health Administration OSHA


Gov. Gavin Newsom calls COVID-19 herd immunity ‘illusory.’ Is he right?

For more than a year since COVID-19 upended our lives, the concept of herd immunity has floated in our future as the goal to be reached: Once enough of us attained immunity by recovering from COVID-19 or receiving vaccination, we could put the pandemic in the rear-view mirror and return to life as we knew it. Experience with the likes of Spanish flu and measles gave us reason to believe the virus will fade away once it can’t find enough unprotected people to infect. But even with the vaccination...
Tags: News, California, Senate, Israel, Sport, Public Health, Soccer, United Kingdom, Pfizer, Lausd, Anthony Fauci, Gavin Newsom, Gandhi, UC San Francisco, LA County, Meyers


COVID vaccines: The mystery of “breakthrough” COVID-19 infections and death after shots

Vaccines are the crowning achievement of our battle against the COVID-19 virus. But they’re not perfect. And our immune systems aren’t either. About 5,800 of 66 million vaccinated Americans — 0.0087% — have become infected by the virus, according to startling new data from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Of these, 396 required hospitalization and 74 people died, the CDC said. The numbers are showing us how the vaccines are working in real life, beyond carefully controlled cl...
Tags: Hollywood, News, California, Cdc, Sport, Cnn, Soccer, Gavin Newsom, Potter, U S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, University of Texas, UC San Francisco, Santa Clara County, San Mateo County, CONTRA COSTA COUNTY, Alameda County


Frontline health workers experienced unprecedented levels of stress during the pandemic

During the acute phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, emergency department doctors, nurses and other frontline staff experienced unprecedented levels of stress and emotional exhaustion that included nightmares or insomnia, according to a UC San Francisco-led study of emergency departments across the country.
Tags: Health, UC San Francisco


Frontline health workers across US faced unique stressors during COVID

During the acute phase of the COVID-19 pandemic, emergency department doctors, nurses and other frontline staff experienced unprecedented levels of stress and emotional exhaustion that included nightmares or insomnia, according to a UC San Francisco-led study of emergency departments across the country.
Tags: Science, US, UC San Francisco


Individuals with Major Depressive Disorder have accelerated cellular aging

Cells from individuals with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) were found to have higher than expected rates of methylation at specific sites on their DNA, when compared to cells from healthy individuals without MDD, according to a study by a multidisciplinary team of UC San Francisco scientists, in collaboration with others.
Tags: Health, Major Depressive Disorder, UC San Francisco, MDD, Major Depressive Disorder MDD


Study shows stronger link between Down syndrome and acute myeloid leukemia

A new large-scale study led by UC Davis Health and UC San Francisco researchers assessed the risks of leukemia in children with Down syndrome.
Tags: Health, UC San Francisco, UC Davis Health


Study finds risk of leukemia higher than expected in children with Down syndrome

The risk of childhood leukemia among kids with Down syndrome is higher than predicted, according to a new study led by UC Davis and UC San Francisco researchers. Early diagnosis of leukemia remains critical.
Tags: Science, UC Davis, UC San Francisco


Accelerated cellular aging associated with mortality seen in depressed individuals

Cells from individuals with Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) were found to have higher than expected rates of methylation at specific sites on their DNA, when compared to cells from healthy individuals without MDD, according to a study by a multidisciplinary team of UC San Francisco scientists, in collaboration with others.
Tags: Science, UC San Francisco, MDD, Major Depressive Disorder MDD


How COVID-19 vaccine gets from the manufacturer to your arm — and why it’s taking so long

Still waiting for your coronavirus shot? Let’s just say the country’s vaccine pipeline has been suffering a few clogs. Yes, we’re all frustrated. And that includes Desi Kotis, chief pharmacy executive at UC San Francisco Health. She has been helping lead UCSF Health’s vaccine distribution program and insists they are just itching to get a shot into everyone’s arm if it wasn’t for the three ugliest words in the vaccine world these days: lack of supply. “There’s no rhyme or reason to how vaccine i...
Tags: News, California, Los Angeles, Sport, Joe Biden, UPS, Walgreens, Public Health, Soccer, Va, Kaiser, Pfizer, Navajo Nation, Blue Shield, Santa Clara, Central Valley


‘Swiss cheese model’ of precautions allows schools to open safely despite coronavirus, experts say

Rewind one year: Fresh finger-paintings dry inside silent classrooms. Half-read books gather dust on shelves. The plant on the teacher’s desk is starting to wilt, but still alive. If we knew then what we know now, schools wouldn’t have closed because of the COVID-19 pandemic — or at least, not for very long, said George Rutherford, professor of epidemiology and biostatistics at UC San Francisco. “We were working on the playbook for Influenza A — the first things to close are elementary schools b...
Tags: Florida, News, Education, Children, California, La, Stanford, Sport, Public Health, Soccer, International Space Station, Connecticut, Lausd, Iss, Orange County, San Bernardino


Trump's first tweet about a 'Chinese virus' caused an increase of anti-Asian hashtags on Twitter, study finds

An image of former President Donald Trump's now-suspended Twitter account and the Twitter logo. Rafael Henrique/SOPA Images/LightRocket via Getty Images Anti-Asian sentiment on Twitter spiked after Trump used the term "Chinese virus" on March 16, 2020. UC San Francisco researchers analyzed posts from the week before and after Trump's tweet. Asians in America have been targeted seemingly because the coronavirus was first found in China. See more stories on Insider's business pag...
Tags: Twitter, Politics, China, US, America, Trends, Atlanta, News UK, Republican Party, Donald Trump, Trump, Yang, UC San Francisco, University of California San Francisco, California State University San Bernardino, Center for the Study of Hate


Study reveals the incidence of structural abnormalities in the developing brain

A large study of brain MRI scans from 11,679 nine- and ten-year-old children reviewed by UC San Francisco neuroradiologists identified potentially life-threatening conditions in 1 in 500 children, and more minor but possibly clinically significant brain abnormalities in 1 out of 25 children.
Tags: Health, UC San Francisco


To live independently longer, look to inexpensive home hacks

The pandemic has exposed weaknesses in nursing homes, causing many families to rethink whether to keep an aging parent at home instead. Now a new study by UC San Francisco has found that many elderly Americans lack the basic self-care equipment that could enable them to live at home longer, postponing the need to move into residential care facilities.
Tags: Science, UC San Francisco


Study outlines testing strategies for safer air travel during the pandemic

Almost 90 percent of infectious travelers could be detected with rapid SARS-CoV-2 tests at the airport, and most imported infections could be prevented with a combination of pre-travel testing and a five-day post-travel quarantine that would only lift with a negative test result, according to a computer simulation by UC San Francisco researchers.
Tags: Science, UC San Francisco


Large new study reveals rates of brain abnormalities in healthy children

A large study of brain MRI scans from 11,679 nine- and ten-year-old children reviewed by UC San Francisco neuroradiologists identified potentially life-threatening conditions in 1 in 500 children, and more minor but possibly clinically significant brain abnormalities in 1 out of 25 children.
Tags: Science, UC San Francisco


UCSF study finds evidence of 55 new chemicals in people

Scientists at UC San Francisco have detected 109 chemicals in a study of pregnant women, including 55 chemicals never before reported in people and 42 'mystery chemicals,' whose sources and uses are unknown.
Tags: Science, UCSF, UC San Francisco


When will we declare victory over COVID-19?

A year into the pandemic, infection rates are falling. Hospitals are quieter; morgues are emptier. Emboldened by vaccines, we’re dropping our masks and stepping closer. Slowly we’re reopening indoor dining, theaters, museums, and schools. Will we declare victory over COVID-19? No, say public health experts. But we’ll negotiate an uneasy truce. Rather than completely eliminating the virus, we can create a strict containment strategy, building public health bulwarks to help fend off an enemy that ...
Tags: Texas, News, California, Stanford, Russia, America, Sport, Soccer, National Institutes of Health, Somalia, Biden, Centers For Disease Control And Prevention, UCSF, Rutherford, UC San Francisco, Maldonado


Black women have higher risk of preterm birth due to fatal police violence

Black women have 80% higher risk of preterm birth between 32 and 33 weeks of pregnancy if a Black person who lives in their neighborhood is killed by police during the pregnancy, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco and UC Berkeley.
Tags: Health, UC San Francisco


Fatal police violence nearby increases risk of preterm birth

Black women have 80% higher risk of preterm birth between 32 and 33 weeks of pregnancy if a Black person who lives in their neighborhood is killed by police during the pregnancy, according to a study by researchers at UC San Francisco and UC Berkeley.
Tags: Science, UC San Francisco


Store fat or burn it? Targeting a single protein flips the switch

As obesity becomes a growing issue worldwide - nearly tripling over the last-half century - scientists are trying to gain a better understanding of the condition at the molecular level. Now, new research led by UC San Francisco scientists suggests that a single protein could play an outsize role in weight gain.
Tags: Science, UC San Francisco


Study implicates disruption in prenatal neurogenesis in the development of ASDs

A new study of autism risk genes by UC San Francisco and UC Berkeley scientists implicates disruption in prenatal neurogenesis - a process in which specialized "progenitor" cells give rise to new brain cells - in the development of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs).
Tags: Health, UC Berkeley, UC San Francisco


Months after fighting coronavirus, some now face heart, lung or neurological problems

Daisy Martinez did her best to avoid the coronavirus. “Everyone was kind of shocked when I came down with it, because I was so protected. I always wore the PPE, washing my hands,” said Martinez, 56. “I was always doing the extra.” But she caught the virus, as have millions of other Californians. And, like potentially hundreds of thousands of Californians, it’s with her still months later. A registered nurse at Queen of the Valley Medical Center in West Covina, Martinez spent three months in a ho...
Tags: Health, News, California, Sport, Public Health, Soccer, Oakland, Monrovia, Usc, Ucla, Morrison, Santa Rosa, Martinez, Riverside, Currier, Lane


Whicker: Dr. Damien Richardson can speak to Tom Brady being a medical marvel

Seventeen years ago, Damien Richardson stood on a sideline in Houston, usually near John Fox, the head coach of the Carolina Panthers. “I got a lot of air time,” Richardson said. Richardson got no game time because he was on crutches. His knee was hurt, and his neck was already questionable from his days as a special-teams super-collider. But he got to see everything but Janet Jackson’s wardrobe malfunction at halftime. He watched the Panthers and Patriots retreat and advance, and he saw Tom Bra...
Tags: Cdc, Sports, NFL, Sport, Dolphins, Harvard, Soccer, Tom Brady, University Of Arizona, Houston, Carolina Panthers, Eva, Grace, Janet Jackson, Damien, Broncos