Posts filtered by tags: University of Basel[x]


 

An Animated Introduction to Friedrich Nietzsche’s Life & Thought

There’s no shame if you’ve never known how to pronounce Friedrich Nietzsche’s name correctly. Even less if you never remember how to spell it. If these happen to be the case, you may be less than familiar with his philosophy. Let Alain de Botton’s animated School of Life video briefly introduce you, and you’ll never forget how to say it: “Knee Cha.” (As for remembering the spelling, you’re on your own.) You’ll also get a short biography of the disgruntled, dyspeptic German philosophe...
Tags: Google, College, Nazis, Philosophy, Alain De Botton, Elizabeth, Facebook Twitter, Josh Jones, Friedrich Nietzsche, University of Basel, Nietzsche, Babich, de Botton, Durham NC Follow, Dionysus, Arthur Schopenhauer Richard


Increased stress hormones accelerate breast cancer metastasis

It has long been thought that stress contributes to cancer progression. Scientists from the University of Basel and the University Hospital of Basel have deciphered the molecular mechanisms linking breast cancer metastasis with increased stress hormones.
Tags: Health, University of Basel, University Hospital of Basel


Stress hormones promote breast cancer metastasis

Scientists from the University of Basel and the University Hospital of Basel have deciphered the molecular mechanisms linking breast cancer metastasis with increased stress hormones. In addition, they found that synthetic derivatives of stress hormones, which are frequently used as anti-inflammatory in cancer therapy, decrease the efficacy of chemotherapy. These results come from patient-derived models of breast cancer in mice and may have implications for the treatment of patients with breast c...
Tags: University of Basel, University Hospital of Basel


Spontaneous spin polarization demonstrated in a two-dimensional material

Physicists from the University of Basel have demonstrated spin alignment of free electrons within a two-dimensional material. Writing in the latest edition of Nature Nanotechnology, they described their observation of spontaneous spin polarization, which cannot occur in ideal two-dimensional materials according to a well-known theorem from the 1960s.
Tags: University of Basel


The moiré patterns of three layers change the electronic properties of graphene

Combining an atomically thin graphene and a boron nitride layer at a slightly rotated angle changes their electrical properties. Physicists at the University of Basel have now shown for the first time the combination with a third layer can result in new material properties also in a three-layer sandwich of carbon and boron nitride. This significantly increases the number of potential synthetic materials, report the researchers in the scientific journal Nano Letters.
Tags: Science, University of Basel


Psychiatry: Case notes indicate impending seclusion

Using notes made by the attending healthcare professionals about psychiatric patients enables impending coercive measures to be predicted in advance -- potentially even through automated text analysis. This was reported by researchers from the University of Basel and the Psychiatric University Clinics Basel in the journal Frontiers in Psychiatry.
Tags: Science, University of Basel, Psychiatric University Clinics Basel


Psychology Around the Net: February 23, 2019

This week’s Psychology Around the Net has the latest on a new website providing professional and unbiased reviews of mental health apps and other digital tools, what optimists do differently (and the changes you can make to become more optimistic), how setting realistic goals affects your well-being, and more. Enjoy! PsyberGuide Seeks to Provide Unbiased Reviews of Mental Health Apps & Digital Tools: Mental health apps and other digital tools have been on the rise for several years now, and at ...
Tags: Psychology, Health, Work, Uber, Image, Family, Technology, Study, Goals, Wealth, Research, Self-help, Schizophrenia, Optimism, Fame, Community


Live better with attainable goals

Those who set realistic goals can hope for a higher level of well-being. The key for later satisfaction is whether the life goals are seen as attainable and what they mean to the person, as psychologists from the University of Basel report in a study with over 970 participants.
Tags: University of Basel


Introduction of flat-rate payments accompanied by an increase in readmission rates

Seven years after the introduction of flat-rate payments at Swiss hospitals, a major study has revealed a slight increase in readmission rates. Researchers from the University of Basel and the cantonal hospital of Aarau reported the findings in the journal JAMA Network Open.
Tags: University of Basel


Cryo-force spectroscopy reveals the mechanical properties of DNA components

Physicists from the University of Basel have developed a new method to examine the elasticity and binding properties of DNA molecules on a surface at extremely low temperatures. With a combination of cryo-force spectroscopy and computer simulations, they were able to show that DNA molecules behave like a chain of small coil springs. The researchers reported their findings in Nature Communications.
Tags: Science, University of Basel, Cryo


Escort service: The role of immune cells in the formation of metastases

Tumor cells use a certain type of immune cells, the so-called neutrophils, to enhance their ability to form metastases. Scientists have deciphered the mechanisms of this collaboration and found strategies for blocking them. This is reported by researchers from the University of Basel and the University Hospital of Basel in the scientific journal Nature.
Tags: Science, University of Basel, University Hospital of Basel


Even psychological placebos have an effect

Placebo effects do not only occur in medical treatment -- placebos can also work when psychological effects are attributed to them. Psychologists from the University of Basel reported these findings in the journal Scientific Reports, based on three studies with over 400 participants.
Tags: University of Basel, Scientific Reports


A small fish provides insight into the genetic basis of evolution

Genetic analysis of sticklebacks shows that isolated populations in similar environments develop in comparable ways. The basis for this is already present in the genome of their genetic ancestors. Evolutionary biologists from the University of Basel and the University of Nottingham report these insights in the journal Evolution Letters.
Tags: University of Nottingham, University of Basel


Urban biodiversity: Remarkable diversity of small animals in Basel gardens

Gardens in urban areas can harbor a remarkable diversity of species. This has been found by researchers from the University of Basel in a field study carried out with the support of private garden owners from the Basel region. Furthermore, the research team shows that nature-friendly garden management and design can largely compensate for the negative effects of urbanization on biodiversity. The study will be presented at the public conference 'Nature conservation in and around Basel' on Feb. 1,...
Tags: Basel, University of Basel


New therapy turns cancer cells into fat to stop it from spreading

In 2018, an estimated 627,000 women died from breast cancer worldwide. Researchers recently discovered a drug combination that turned cancer cells into fat cells, preventing its proliferation. The drug therapy could be used to halt metastasis, the leading cause of death from cancer.It may be a family member, a friend, a coworker, or even yourself, but chances are breast cancer will invade your life at some point. According to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, 242,476 new cases of fe...
Tags: Health, Medicine, Cancer, Genetics, Medical Research, Innovation, Switzerland, Disease, Fda, Illness, University of Basel, Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Molecular Biology, Human body, Gerhard Christofori


Method For Fooling Cancer Cells Into Fat Cells Can Stop Cancer's Spread

Researchers from the University of Basel in Switzerland have discovered that they can prevent the formation of metastases by fooling breast cancer cells into fat cells. The proof-of-concept study was published in the journal Cancer Cell. Technology Networks reports: Malignant cells can rapidly respond and adapt to changing microenvironmental conditions, by reactivating a cellular process called epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), enabling them to alter their molecular properties and transdi...
Tags: Tech, Switzerland, Fda, University of Basel, Cancer Cell Technology Networks


Engineered T cells promote long-term organ transplant acceptance

Organ transplant rejection is a major problem in transplantation medicine. Suppressing the immune system to prevent organ rejection, however, opens the door to life-threatening infections. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have now discovered a molecular approach preventing rejection of the transplanted graft while simultaneously maintaining the ability to fight against infections.
Tags: Science, University of Basel, Biozentrum


Breast cancer cells in mice tricked into turning into fat cells

As cancer cells respond to cues in their microenvironment, they can enter a highly plastic state in which they are susceptible to transdifferentiation into a different type of cell. Researchers at the University of Basel in Switzerland exploited this critical phase, known as an epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), to coax breast cancer cells in mice to turn into harmless fat cells. The proof-of-concept study appears Jan. 14, 2019, in the journal Cancer Cell.
Tags: Science, Switzerland, University of Basel


Bacteria rely on classic business model

The pneumonia causing pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa has developed a twin-track strategy to colonize its host. It generates two different cells -- motile spreaders and virulent stickers. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have now elucidated how the germ attaches to tissue within seconds and consecutively spreads. Just like the business model: settling -- growing -- expanding.
Tags: University of Basel, Biozentrum


Data storage using individual molecules

Researchers from the University of Basel have reported a new method that allows the physical state of just a few atoms or molecules within a network to be controlled. It is based on the spontaneous self-organization of molecules into extensive networks with pores about one nanometer in size. In the journal 'small', the physicists reported on their investigations, which could be of particular importance for the development of new storage devices.
Tags: Science, University of Basel


Deadly combination: Drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off energy supply

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth - this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel's Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in Cell Reports, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply.
Tags: Health, University of Basel


Lethal combination: Drug cocktail turns off the juice to cancer cells

A widely used diabetes medication combined with an antihypertensive drug specifically inhibits tumor growth - this was discovered by researchers from the University of Basel's Biozentrum two years ago. In a follow-up study, recently published in Cell Reports, the scientists report that this drug cocktail induces cancer cell death by switching off their energy supply.
Tags: Science, University of Basel


Swiss university awards Ethereum’s Vitalik Buterin with honorary PhD

The University of Basel – an institution that has produced great minds like philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche and psychiatrist Carl Jung – has awarded Vitalik Buterin, a prominent blockchain figure and the co-founder of Ethereum, with an honorary doctorate. The Faculty of Business and Economics has decided to grant Buterin an honorary degree for his “outstanding achievements” in the fields of cryptocurrencies, smart contracts, and the design of institutions. “He makes a groundbreaking contribution...
Tags: Startups, Ethereum, Cryptocurrency, Blockchain, Carl Jung, Friedrich Nietzsche, University of Basel, Vitalik Buterin, Buterin, Hard Fork, Faculty of Business and Economics


New Research Has Concluded That All Humans Are Descendants Of Just One Couple Who Lived 200,000 Years Ago

In a groundbreaking new study, scientists from The Rockefeller University in New York City and the Biozentrum at the University of Basel in Switzerland have concluded that each and every human alive today descended from just one couple who lived from between 100,000 to 200,000 years ago. As the Daily Mail reports, scientists came to this dramatic conclusion after studying the genetic bar codes, or snippets of DNA, of over 5 million animals taken from a whopping 100,000 different species and det...
Tags: Science, New York City, Daily Mail, Switzerland, Rockefeller University, University of Basel


Upcoming Speaking Engagements

This is a current list of where and when I am scheduled to speak: I'm speaking at Kiwicon in Wellington, New Zealand on November 16, 2018. I'm appearing on IBM Resilient's End of Year Review webinar on "The Top Cyber Security Trends in 2018 and Predictions for the Year Ahead," December 6, 2018 at 12:00 PM EST. I'm giving a talk on "Securing a World of Physically Capable Computers" at MIT on December 6, 2018. I'm speaking at the The Digital Society Conference 2018: Empowering Ecosystems on ...
Tags: Mit, Ibm, Paris France, Kiwicon, Bruce Schneier, Basel Switzerland, Wellington New Zealand, University of Basel, Schneier news


Metal leads to the desired configuration

Scientists at the University of Basel have found a way to change the spatial arrangement of bipyridine molecules on a surface. These potential components of dye-sensitized solar cells form complexes with metals and thereby alter their chemical conformation. The results of this interdisciplinary collaboration between chemists and physicists from Basel were recently published in the scientific journal ACS Omega.
Tags: Basel, University of Basel


Improving paleotemperature reconstruction: Swiss lakes as a model system

For years, scientists have been trying to determine the climate of the past in order to make better predictions about future climate conditions. Now, there has been a breakthrough in the methodology of climate reconstruction based on microbial molecular fossils. Researchers under the direction of the University of Basel analyzed sediment samples collected from more than 30 Swiss lakes. Their findings can be applied to lakes worldwide, as the scientists report in PNAS.
Tags: University of Basel


Diversity in the brain -- how millions of neurons become unique

How is it possible that so many different and highly specific neurons arise in the brain? A mathematic model developed by researchers from the University of Basel's Biozentrum demonstrates that different variants of genes enable such a random diversity. The scientists describe in Cell Reports that despite countless numbers of newly formed neurons, the genetic variants equip neurons individually and precisely for their specific function.
Tags: Science, University of Basel, Biozentrum


Probing individual edge states with unprecedented precision

A new technique makes it possible to obtain an individual fingerprint of the current-carrying edge states occurring in novel materials such as topological insulators or 2D materials. Physicists of the University of Basel present the new method together with American scientists in Nature Communications.
Tags: Science, University of Basel


Like a zipper -- how cells form new blood vessels

Blood vessel formation relies on the ability of vascular cells to move while remaining firmly connected to each other. This enables the vessels to grow and sprout without leaking any blood. In Nature Communications, scientists from the Biozentrum at the University of Basel describe how this works. In this process, the cytoskeleton pushes the cell forward, while an adhesion protein subsequently closes the gap to the neighboring cell, like a zipper.
Tags: Science, Nature Communications, University of Basel