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Looking Far to the Future: San Marco - The Basilica of Venice in the Third Millennium

Sala del Maggior Consiglio - Great Council Chamber - Photo: Cat Bauer (Venice, Italy) Power. Glory. Wealth. The sheer magnificence of the Great Council Chamber inside Palazzo Ducale is overwhelming. The immense hall was where the noblemen of the Great Council of the Venetian Republic convened, the 1,000 to 2,000 aristocrats who composed the most important political body of Venice and who were the guardians of the laws of State. The Great Council met for the first time in the Sala del Magg...
Tags: Travel, Rome, Munich, West, Venice, Istanbul, San Marco, East, Aachen, Basilica, Sala, Constantinople, Roman Empire, Hagia Sophia, University of Cologne, Venetian Republic


Looking to the Future: San Marco - The Basilica of Venice in the Third Millennium

Sala del Maggior Consiglio - Great Council Chamber - Photo: Cat Bauer (Venice, Italy) Power. Glory. Wealth. The sheer magnificence of the Great Council Chamber inside Palazzo Ducale is overwhelming. The immense hall was where the noblemen of the Great Council of the Venetian Republic convened, the 1,000 to 2,000 aristocrats who composed the most important political body of Venice and who were the guardians of the laws of State. The Great Council met for the first time in the Sala del Magg...
Tags: Travel, Rome, Munich, West, Venice, Istanbul, San Marco, East, Aachen, Basilica, Sala, Constantinople, Roman Empire, Hagia Sophia, University of Cologne, Venetian Republic


Physics: Behavior of 'trapped' electrons in a one-dimensional world observed in the lab

University of Cologne physicists directly observe the separation of spin and charge as predicted by the Tomonaga-Luttinger liquid theory for the first time. The new findings have been reported in 'Physical Review X'.
Tags: Science, University of Cologne, Tomonaga Luttinger


Rice cultivation: Balance of phosphorus and nitrogen determines growth and yield

Cluster of Excellence on Plant Sciences CEPLAS at the University of Cologne cooperates with partners from Beijing to develop new basic knowledge on nutrient signalling pathways in rice plants. This knowledge can contribute to greater food security.
Tags: Science, Beijing, University of Cologne, Plant Sciences CEPLAS


Stick insect study shows the significance of passive muscle force for fast movements

Zoologists from the University of Cologne gain new insights into the motor function of limbs of different sizes. They have now published their results in 'Current Biology'.
Tags: Science, University of Cologne


Astrophysics: First detailed observations of material orbiting close to a black hole

ESO's GRAVITY instrument confirms black hole status of the Milky Way center. Scientists from the University of Cologne contributed the decisive instruments.
Tags: Science, University of Cologne


New test speeds up diagnosis of multi-resistant pathogens

Researchers at the University of Cologne and the German Center for Infection Research have made an important step towards speeding up the diagnosis of multi-resistant pathogens.
Tags: Health, University of Cologne, German Center for Infection Research


New test procedure accelerates the diagnosis of multi-resistant hospital pathogens

A research team from the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Cologne and the German Centre for Infection Research has achieved a breakthrough: The diagnosis of multi-resistant hospital pathogens is now possible in 45 minutes instead of 72 hours. Further research is necessary before the procedure is ready for clinical application.
Tags: Science, University of Cologne, Faculty of Medicine, German Centre for Infection Research


The dynamics and energetics of locomotion depend on the number of propulsive legs

A zoologist from the University of Cologne has modelled the locomotion of animals and robots with different numbers of leg pairs. Besides providing new insights on the relationship between the number of leg pairs and body dynamics, his research sheds light on the evolution of bipedalism and paves the way for new applications in legged robotics and innovative neuro-mechanical modelling approaches.
Tags: University of Cologne


Magnetic vortices: Two independent magnetic skyrmion phases discovered in a single material

For the first time a team of researchers have discovered two different phases of magnetic skyrmions in a single material. Physicists of the Technical Universities of Munich and Dresden and the University of Cologne can now better study and understand the properties of these magnetic structures, which are important for both basic research and applications.
Tags: Dresden, University of Cologne, Technical Universities of Munich


'Surprising' methane dunes found on Pluto

Pluto is covered with surprising dunes made of methane ice, which have formed relatively recently despite the frigid dwarf planet's very thin atmosphere, international researchers said Thursday. Pluto's atmosphere has a surface pressure 100,000 times lower than Earth's, which researchers suspected might be too little to allow tiny grains of solid methane to mobilize and become airborne. Yet mild winds blowing across Pluto's surface at speeds of some 19-25 miles (30-40 kilomet...
Tags: Science, Nasa, Earth, Mars, Pluto, Venus, Afp, Brigham Young University, Churyumov Gerasimenko, University of Cologne, Jani Radebaugh, University of Plymouth, Radebaugh Brigham Young University, Matt Telfer, Eric Parteli, Parteli


How Amazonian drum communication sounds (and acts) like human speech

In the forests of the Amazon, West Africa, and Asia, villagers often beat on large drums to send messages miles away. While you may think that the patterns are similar to Morse Code, they're actually simplified versions of the villagers' spoken languages, "without consonants or vowels but with enough connection to the original language that speakers can reliably interpret what they mean." In newly published research, University of Cologne linguist Frank Seifart and his colleagues reveal how i...
Tags: Asia, Video, Music, News, Nigeria, Language, Linguistics, Central African Republic, Chin, University of Cologne, Drums, Banda Linda, Frank Seifart, Amazon West Africa, Myanmar Spoken Bora, Seifart


Researchers compute their way to the center of the Earth

A team led by Dr. Clemens Prescher and Prof. Sandro Jahn at the University of Cologne has been using Jülich Supercomputing Centre resources to study high-pressure and- temperature material interactions deep below the surface of the Earth.
Tags: Science, Earth, University of Cologne, Clemens Prescher, Sandro Jahn


Researchers Reveal What Robots Could Learn From Roaches

It seems like robots could learn from roaches. Researchers from the University of Cologne in Germany have discovered a change in roaches’ gait that could help teach robots to walk.
Tags: News, Germany, University of Cologne


Insights on fast cockroaches can help teach robots to walk

A study scientists from the University of Cologne have published in Frontiers in Zoology shows for the first time that fast insects can change their gait -- like a mammal's transition from trot to gallop. These new insights could contribute to making the locomotion of robots more energy efficient.
Tags: University of Cologne


The Majestic Beard of Zurich: Heinrich Bullinger (1504–1575)

In an age when the celibate priesthood set itself apart from the laity, in part, with clean-shaven faces, the Protestant Reformers grew beards to make a statement. They were restoring both maleness and humanity to church leadership, and they weren’t afraid to have it written on their faces. Word is that Heinrich Bullinger, chief minister in the leading Swiss city of Zurich, had the best beard of all. One historian describes Bullinger’s as “majestically bushy” — and it wasn’t altogeth...
Tags: Europe, Germany, Religion, Catholic, Luther, Zurich, Abraham, Protestant, University of Cologne, David Steinmetz, Steinmetz, Kappel, Ulrich Zwingli, Diarmaid MacCulloch, Zwingli, Bullinger


Market Value pivoted Algae biomass productivity for oil to other high value products – is oil still on the horizon, somewhere?

By Dr. Anju D. Krivov, Lee Enterprises Consulting, Inc. Special to The Digest Neil DeGrasse Tyson’s vision of an algae oil machine fed with a bucketful of algae soup from a pond at one end spits out oil at the other – that must have amused the NOVA Science television viewers back in 2009 – sparking a thought provoking, super charged new vision to drive, fly and sail on engines fed with algae oil churned out from only a few of over 30,000 algae species. As a matter of fact, the algae oil market ...
Tags: Japan, UK, Texas, Scotland, Massachusetts, Exxon Mobil, University, Bill Gates, Netherlands, Arizona, Amsterdam, Neil Degrasse Tyson, Mars, Producer News, DOE, US Navy


Venus's turbulent atmosphere

A research paper published today by Nature Astronomy sheds light on the so far un-explored nightside circulation at the upper cloud level of Venus. Researchers from the Rhenish Institute for Environmental Research at the University of Cologne are part of an international research project which has now presented these first comprehensive findings. They discovered unexpected patterns of slow motion and abundant station-ary waves in Venus's nighttime sky.
Tags: Science, Venus, University of Cologne, Nature Astronomy, Rhenish Institute for Environmental Research


Immune defense mechanism: How proteins bring together membrane blebs

Researchers have gained new insights into the mechanisms with which certain proteins help the immune defense mechanism in the human body. Pathogens such as viruses or bacteria are wrapped in membrane blebs and rendered harmless there. What are known as guanylate-binding proteins are crucial in this. How they contribute to the process that was investigated by researchers from Ruhr-Universität Bochum, the Paul-Ehrlich-Institut and the University of Cologne, together with other partners from Erlang...
Tags: Science, University of Cologne, Erlangen, Ruhr Universität Bochum the Paul Ehrlich Institut


Environmental messages that promote a return to a positive past found to be more effective in convincing conservatives

(Phys.org)—A pair of researchers with the University of Cologne in Germany has found that phrasing pro-environmental messages in past-focused ways was received more warmly by people who described themselves as conservatives than messages that warned of future problems. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Matthew Baldwin and Joris Lammers describe the study they carried out with online volunteers and why they believe their results could have a real-world i...
Tags: Science, Germany, Social Sciences, National Academy of Sciences, University of Cologne


Solving the puzzle of necroptosis

Cells can die in many ways. Apoptosis is a regulated cell death process that ensures the orderly disassembly and removal of the dying cell. Necroptosis is a more recently identified cell death pathway that results in the release of cellular components that can trigger inflammation. Researchers from the Cluster of Excellence CECAD at the University of Cologne discovered a novel mechanism that regulates necroptosis and inflammation.
Tags: Science, University of Cologne


How are dreaded multidrug-resistant pathogens brought into hospitals?

In largest study of its kind in Europe, DZIF scientists from the University of Cologne investigated this question and discovered that almost ten percent of patients admitted into hospitals already bring these dreaded pathogens along with them from home.
Tags: Europe, University of Cologne


For These African Migrants, Life In China Isn't What They Were Promised

They did not know very much about China but they had heard it was the world’s second-largest economy and Africa’s leading trading partner, so they assumed there must be opportunity. Europe, of course, was their first choice but with European Union countries overwhelmed by migrants and cracking down on smugglers, China would have to do. Through a series of interviews and letters obtained by researchers, these Gambian migrants explained how they were lured by deceptive visa brokers who charged th...
Tags: Europe, News, China, Germany, Africa, European Union, Gambia, Huffington Post, University Of Oslo, Guangzhou, Banjul, Farah Mohamed, University of Cologne, Eric Cobus


Scientists in Cologne develop a more cost-efficient method to cultivate algae

In Germany, Professor Michael Melkonian and a team from the University of Cologne have developed a new method that could make the production of algae easier – and hence reduce the costs of the products based on this material. Their findings are published in the journal Trends in Biotechnology. The “Porous Substrate Bioreactor” (PSBR), also known as the twin-layer system, uses a new principle to separate the algae from a nutrient solution by means of a porous reactor surface on which the microalg...
Tags: Germany, Research, Cologne, Algae, Michael Melkonian, University of Cologne


Microalgae—a promising future resource?

Microalgae hold tremendous potential for industrial biotechnology. They are an important resource in the production of food and medications, and in many other applications. In comparison to bacteria and fungi, however, they still play only a minor role. The economic use of these organisms has been difficult in the past primarily because existing production procedures are too costly. The algae specialist Professor Michael Melkonian and his team from the University of Cologne have now developed a ...
Tags: Science, Biotechnology, Michael Melkonian, University of Cologne


Stem cells respond to mechanical forces by changing their structure

A team of scientists led by Sara Wickström, Principal Investigator at CECAD, the Cluster of Excellence in Cellular Stress Responses in Aging-associated Diseases at the University of Cologne, gained new insights into how stem cells feel and respond to external mechanical forces by changing the way DNA is organized in the nucleus, and thereby the expression of genes that are required for stem cell differentiation.
Tags: Science, Cell & Microbiology, University of Cologne


Stem cells feel the force

A team of scientists led by Sara Wickström, Principal Investigator at CECAD, the Cluster of Excellence in Cellular Stress Responses in Aging-associated Diseases at the University of Cologne, gained new insights into how stem cells feel and respond to external mechanical forces by changing the way DNA is organized in the nucleus, and thereby the expression of genes that are required for stem cell differentiation.
Tags: University of Cologne


Insurance causes costs of services to rise

Dishonesty not only damages relation between human beings, it can also have a devastating effect on the economy. Scientists from the University of Cologne and the University of Innsbruck in Austria have now found out that in markets for credence goods—markets that require a high degree of trust—there are also strong incentives for dishonest behavior.
Tags: Austria, Economics & Business, University of Cologne, University of Innsbruck


Vegetation in Russian Arctic has memory

Scientists from the University of Cologne and the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research in Potsdam are cooperating on a research project on past climate changes in the Arctic. They found out that the degree of cold of the preceding ice age determines how fast the vegetation subsequently adapts to the warmer temperatures of the interglacial period. This allows for more precise predictions of future climate change.
Tags: Potsdam, University of Cologne


Researchers analyze risk of becoming lonely at different phases of life

Maike Luhmann from the University of Cologne and Louise C. Hawkley from the National Opinion Research Center at the University of Chicago were able to find out in which phases of their lives people are most at risk of becoming lonely.
Tags: University Of Chicago, University of Cologne, National Opinion Research Center, Maike Luhmann