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Pfizer just asked the FDA to authorize its coronavirus vaccine, a critical step before it can be given to more people

The first patient enrolled in Pfizer's COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine clinical trial at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore receiving an injection. University of Maryland School of Medicine/AP Photo Pfizer and BioNTech requested that the US Food and Drug Administration review their coronavirus vaccine for emergency authorization, they announced Friday. The vaccine was found to be 95% effective at preventing COVID-19 in a late-stage trial. The FDA has said it might ...
Tags: News, US, Trends, Healthcare, Fda, Pfizer, Baltimore, Centers For Disease Control And Prevention, Reuters, US Food and Drug Administration, Baylor College of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Moderna, Andrew Dunn, BioNtech, Albert Bourla


Pfizer is about to ask the FDA to authorize its coronavirus vaccine, a critical step before it can be given to more people

The first patient enrolled in Pfizer's COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine clinical trial at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore, receives an injection. University of Maryland School of Medicine/AP Photo Pfizer and BioNTech are about to request that the US Food and Drug Administration review their coronavirus vaccine for emergency authorization. The vaccine was 95% effective at preventing COVID-19 in a late-stage trial. The FDA has said it might take weeks to review the...
Tags: News, US, Trends, Healthcare, Fda, Pfizer, Baltimore, Centers For Disease Control And Prevention, Reuters, US Food and Drug Administration, Baylor College of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Moderna, Andrew Dunn, BioNtech, Allana Akhtar


Moderna's coronavirus vaccine doesn't need to be as icy cold as Pfizer's, and that could make it easier to distribute

Oil markets surged in the hours after Pfizer announced positive results from its coronavirus vaccine study. Dado Ruvic/Reuters Moderna and Pfizer have both announced promising trial results this week, suggesting their coronavirus vaccines perform very well at preventing COVID-19 infections.  But Moderna's shots can be kept in the fridge for a month, while Pfizer's can only last five days that way.  Pfizer has developed special vaccine briefcases that can keep its shots frozen properly for ...
Tags: Science, News, US, Trends, Public Health, Fda, Pfizer, Vaccines, Reuters, US Food and Drug Administration FDA, Baltimore Maryland, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Adalja, Amesh Adalja, Pandemic, Moderna


Pfizer's vaccine relies on a 'cold chain' that keeps the shots colder than a freezer. Here's how it works.

Pfizer and BioNTech 's vaccine must be kept at ultra-cold temperatures on its journey from the production line to a patient's arm. Pfizer developed a suitcase-sized box that uses dry ice to keep between 1,000 and 5,000 doses for 10 days at minus 70 degrees Celsius. Leon Neal/Getty Images Pfizer's new coronavirus vaccine will need to be kept hyper-cold, at -94 degrees Fahrenheit, as it is shipped around the globe. That could make it difficult to get the vaccine distributed, especial...
Tags: England, Science, News, Nbc, Cdc, Russia, US, Trends, Public Health, Pfizer, Vaccines, Wall Street Journal, Business Insider, Reuters, US Food and Drug Administration, Sanofi


A spate of advancements suggest new coronavirus treatments could be on the horizon — here's the latest

Investigational remdesivir vials at a Gilead Sciences facility in La Verne, California. Reuters The landscape of potential COVID-19 treatments is changing quickly.  Two potential therapies from pharma giant Eli Lilly — an antibody drug and an arthritis pill — saw promising results in recent weeks.  An antibody drug from biotech company Regeneron was also found to lowered the amount of virus detected in patients' samples. Growing evidence also shows that steroids improve outcomes in severe ...
Tags: UK, Science, News, China, Trends, Who, World Health Organization, Fda, University of Oxford, Anthony Fauci, Baltimore, Business Insider, Steroids, Roche, Gilead Sciences, Provo Utah


5 potential coronavirus treatments have seen major advancements this month — here's what the new research shows

Investigational remdesivir vials at a Gilead Sciences facility in La Verne, California. Reuters The landscape of potential COVID-19 treatments is changing quickly.  Two potential therapies from pharma giant Eli Lilly — an antibody drug and an arthritis pill — saw promising results this month.  An antibody drug from biotech company Regeneron also entered a major clinical trial last week. Meanwhile, new data suggests that the rheumatoid arthritis drug Actemra and steroids like hydrocortisone...
Tags: UK, Science, News, China, Trends, Who, World Health Organization, Fda, Anthony Fauci, Baltimore, Steroids, Roche, Gilead Sciences, Provo Utah, Port au Prince Haiti, Heilongjiang province


UMSOM researchers determine role of protein in development of hearing hair cells

Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine have conducted a study that has determined the role that a critical protein plays in the development of hair cells.
Tags: Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine


AstraZeneca's phase 3 coronavirus vaccine trial was just put on pause because a participant may have had an adverse reaction

The first patient enrolled in Pfizer's COVID-19 coronavirus vaccine clinical trial at the University of Maryland School of Medicine receives an injection, May 4, 2020. University of Maryland School of Medicine via AP AstraZeneca's phase 3 trial of its coronavirus vaccine has been put on hold because a participant in the UK may have had a serious adverse reaction. Pauses like this are routine in studies, but this is the first known hold in a phase 3 trial of a COVID-19 vaccine. This cou...
Tags: Health, UK, New York, Science, News, US, Trends, South Africa, United Kingdom, Healthcare, Astrazeneca, Vaccine, University of Oxford, New York Stock Exchange, Trump, U S Food and Drug Administration


A look at Robert Redfield's history and experience, the former Army physician and researcher leading the CDC under Trump

Robert Redfield, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), wears a protective mask during a House Select Subcommittee on the Coronavirus Crisis hearing on July 31, 2020 in Washington, DC. Erin Scott-Pool/Getty Images Dr. Robert Redfield has been the director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention since March 2018. Earlier this week, Redfield asked governors to prepare state distribution facilities for coronavirus vaccines by November 1— two days before...
Tags: Japan, Congress, Washington Post, Cdc, Washington, Mexico, Senate, White House, US, America, Trends, Cnn, Atlantic, Washington Dc, House, New York Times


The Top Funded Women Founders in Every State

The top women entrepreneurs and female founders in the U.S. are doing well, but there is a considerable gap from top to bottom. But there is an even bigger gap between what male and female founders receive in funding. According to PitchBook, in 2019 only 2.8% of the companies founded solely by women secured the total capital invested in venture-backed startups in the US. It goes up by almost 10% (12.4%) when it is co-founded by female and male entrepreneurs. As bleak as this might seem, this ha...
Tags: Hbo, UK, Australia, California, Washington, China, Ipo, Singapore, US, LSU, Sales, Startup, CMO, Mit, Harvard University, Alaska


Wide variations in car seat breathing assessment conducted on premature newborns

A new study from the University of Maryland School of Medicine has found wide variations throughout the United States in the way hospitals ensure that premature or low birth weight infants can breathe safely in a car seat before discharging them. The same infant who passes a screening in one hospital's newborn nursery may fail in similar facilities at another hospital's nursery.
Tags: Science, United States, University of Maryland School of Medicine


Researchers receive federal funding to rapidly repurpose FDA-approved drugs for COVID-19

Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine will be partnering on an agreement funded by the federal government's Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to rapidly test hundreds of drugs, approved and marketed for other conditions, to see whether any can be repurposed to prevent or treat COVID-19.
Tags: Health, Fda, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Darpa, University of Maryland School of Medicine


UMSOM researchers identify how certain gene mutations cause ALS

Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine have identified how certain gene mutations cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig's disease.
Tags: Health, Lou Gehrig, University of Maryland School of Medicine


Flu vaccine coverage linked to reduced antibiotic prescribing

Researchers at CDDEP, Johns Hopkins University, and the University of Maryland School of Medicine assessed the impact of influenza vaccination coverage on state-level antibiotic prescribing rates in the United States between 2010 and 2017.
Tags: Science, United States, University of Maryland School of Medicine, CDDEP Johns Hopkins University


Data shows visitors from other states descended on Georgia once restaurants, salons reopened

Researchers at the University of Maryland who analyzed smartphone location data found that in the week after Georgia let businesses like dine-in restaurants and hair salons reopen on April 24, an additional 62,440 visitors traveled there daily, with most coming from nearby states where those businesses were still closed.The researchers said this provides evidence reopening some state economies earlier than others could possibly worsen and extend the spread of coronavirus. "It's exactly the k...
Tags: Post, Florida, News, Senate, Georgia, The Washington Post, University Of Maryland, Trump, Arby, Zhang, Fitzpatrick, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Sen Joe Manchin, Meagan Fitzpatrick, Lei Zhang, Alabama South Carolina Tennessee


Researchers uncover mechanism by which gene mutations potentially give rise to kidney disease

Researchers from the Center for Precision Disease Modeling at the University of Maryland School of Medicine have uncovered a mechanism that appears to explain how certain genetic mutations give rise to a rare genetic kidney disorder called nephrotic syndrome.
Tags: Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Center for Precision Disease Modeling


UMSOM launches special COVID-19 website for pediatric healthcare providers and practices

The University of Maryland School of Medicine has launched a special COVID-19 website for pediatric healthcare providers and practices, parents, and children.
Tags: Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine


Researchers develop gene catalog comprising community of microbes in vaginal microbio

University of Maryland School of Medicine's (UMSOM) Institute for Genome Sciences (IGS) researchers have created the first catalogue of genes that comprise the community of microbes, which inhabit the human vagina. The catalogue, called human vaginal non-redundant gene catalog (VIRGO), was recently released as a public resource that can be used by researchers to facilitate a more in-depth understanding of the role of vaginal microorganisms in women's health and to potentially develop future trea...
Tags: Science, University of Maryland School of Medicine, UMSOM Institute for Genome Sciences IGS


Targeting overactive immune cells with experimental drug could improve TBI symptoms

Researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine found that targeting overactive immune cells in the brain with an experimental drug could limit brain cell loss and reverse cognitive and motor difficulties caused by traumatic brain injury.
Tags: Health, TBI, University of Maryland School of Medicine


Workers on the front lines of coronavirus response at 6 US hospitals reveal what they do when a suspected case comes in

A new coronavirus that originated in Wuhan, China, has infected 13 people in the US. Staff at six US hospitals told Business Insider about how they are handling potential coronavirus patients. People who might have the virus get a negative-pressure isolation chamber, and staff wear protective gear while treating their symptoms and investigating their illness. For the latest case total, death toll, and travel information, see Business Insider's live updates here. Visit Business Insider's homepa...
Tags: South Korea, Cdc, Washington, China, US, San Francisco, Trends, Chicago, Jordan, Wuhan, Business Insider, Providence, Martinez, Yale School of Medicine, Leslie, San Diego California


Workers at 6 US hospitals reveal how they respond to potential coronavirus cases — including face shields and negative-pressure isolation chambers

A new coronavirus that originated in Wuhan, China has infected a dozen people in the US. Staff at six US hospitals told Business Insider how they are handling potential coronavirus patients. People who might have the virus get a negative-pressure isolation chamber, and staff wear protective gear while treating their symptoms and investigating their illness. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Hospitals across the US have negative-pressure isolation chambers, face shields, and ...
Tags: South Korea, Cdc, Washington, China, US, San Francisco, Trends, Chicago, Jordan, Wuhan, Business Insider, Providence, Martinez, Yale School of Medicine, Leslie, University of Maryland School of Medicine


UMSOM experts call for influenza vaccinations to prevent outbreaks in U.S. border detention centers

Over the past year, at least seven children have died from diseases including influenza while being detained by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security's Customs and Border Protection agency. Infectious disease experts at the University of Maryland School of Medicine called for protections like influenza vaccinations to prevent serious outbreaks.
Tags: Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, U S Department of Homeland Security s Customs


Structure of most lethal toxin produced by C. difficile bacteria identified

Researchers from the University of Maryland School of Medicine and their colleagues have identified the structure of the most lethal toxin produced by certain strains of Clostridium difficile bacteria, a potentially deadly infection associated with the use of antibiotics. The
Tags: Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine


Researchers identify key structure of C. difficle bacteria that could lead to future treatments

Researchers from the University of Maryland School of Medicine and their colleagues have identified the structure of the most lethal toxin produced by certain strains of Clostridium difficile bacteria, a potentially deadly infection associated with the use of antibiotics. The researchers mapped out the delivery and binding components of the toxin, which could pave the way for new drugs to neutralize it.
Tags: Science, University of Maryland School of Medicine


Suspended animation in humans successfully tried for the first time

Researchers from the University of Maryland School of Medicine, for the first time have put a patient in “suspended animation” successfully. Using this method, they lowered the body temperature of the human patient for the first time. This would help surgeons to prolong the time of surgery to correct traumatic injuries. The plan of their feat was published in the latest issue of the New Scientist last week.
Tags: Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine


Scientists replace blood with icy solution to save lives in danger

A trial at the University of Maryland Medical Centre in Baltimore puts patients with death-causing injuries into suspended animation.The technique works by cooling the body and the brain.This gives surgeons more times to help the patients survive. None For the first time ever, a trial in the United States succeeded in placing humans in suspended animation. The approach involves cooling people with catastrophic injuries to allow for additional time to save their lives.The technique, called emer...
Tags: Biology, Medicine, Earth, Public Health, Chemistry, Medical Research, United States, Innovation, New Scientist, Saturn, Baltimore, EPR, University of Maryland School of Medicine, New York Academy of Sciences, Human body, Samuel Tisherman


Humans Placed in Suspended Animation For the First Time

Doctors have placed humans in suspended animation for the first time, as part of a trial in the US that aims to make it possible to fix traumatic injuries that would otherwise cause death. From a report: Samuel Tisherman, at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, told New Scientist that his team of medics had placed at least one patient in suspended animation, calling it "a little surreal" when they first did it. He wouldn't reveal how many people had survived as a result. The technique,...
Tags: US, Tech, Baltimore, First Time, EPR, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Samuel Tisherman, University of Maryland Medical Centre, Tisherman


Researchers discover potential therapy to treat detrimental effects of marijuana

A University of Maryland School of Medicine study using a preclinical animal model suggests that prenatal exposure to THC, the psychoactive component of cannabis, makes the brain's dopamine neurons (an integral component of the reward system) hyperactive and increases sensitivity to the behavioral effects of THC during pre-adolescence.
Tags: University of Maryland School of Medicine


Combination of two drugs disrupts cancer cells' ability to survive DNA damage, study finds

In continuing efforts to find novel ways to kill cancer cells, researchers at the University of Maryland School of Medicine have identified a new pathway that leads to the destruction of cancer cells.
Tags: Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine


First drone delivery of organ for human transplant

My late brother Mark was a transplant surgeon. He told me how sometimes he'd be woken up in the middle of the night to fly to a nearby city to retrieve, say, a kidney, from someone who had just died (frequently in a motorcycle crash), then carry the organ on a plane to another city where he'd install the kidney into a waiting patient, and then fly back home. (He felt it important to personally retrieve the organ that he'd then be transplanting.) I thought of that process while reading about the...
Tags: Video, News, Medicine, Alabama, Drones, New York Times, Surgery, University Of Maryland, Mark, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Transplants, Organs, Scalea, Living Legacy Foundation of Maryland, Joseph R Scalea