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Why large groups of people often come to the same conclusions

Large groups of people everywhere tend to come to the same conclusions.In small groups, there's a much wider diversity of ideas.The mechanics of a large group make some ideas practically inevitable. People make sense of the world by organizing things into categories and naming them. "These are circles." "That's a tree." "Those are rocks." It's one way we tame our world. There's a weird correspondence between different cultures, though — even though we come from different places and very differe...
Tags: Psychology, Decision Making, Amazon, Facebook, Social Media, Personality, Innovation, Collaboration, University of Pennsylvania, Debate, Cooperation, Nature Communications, Annenberg School for Communication, Damon Centola, Douglas Guilbeault, Network Dynamics Group NDG


Despite New Stimulus, More Than 3 Million Renters Facing COVID-19 Unemployment Bear Extreme Housing Cost Burden

– Recently finalized stimulus package will help, but rent burdens continue to exceed affordability threshold – Zillow estimates more than 3 million renters who were employed last March remained unemployed as of November, largely due to widespread layoffs in high-contact industries like hospitality and restaurants. – Unemployed U.S. renters will typically spend 43% of unemployment insurance income on rent because of $300 weekly payments in the newly passed stimulus package, down from 81.2% ...
Tags: Real Estate, News, Radio, United States, Washington Dc, Portland, San Jose, University of Pennsylvania, Zillow, Oklahoma City, Chicago Il, Birmingham Al, Seattle Wa, New York Ny, Boston University, Houston TX


Climate change doesn't spare the smallest

With a combined century of experience in the tropics, the University of Pennsylvania's Daniel Janzen and Winnie Hallwachs have seen a striking contraction of insect numbers and diversity. They share new data suggesting that climate change is the culprit and a way to protect the survivors: a bioliteracy program that aims to educate Costa Rican residents about the diversity around them and empower them to conserve it. It's a model they hope catches on and spreads around the globe.
Tags: Science, University of Pennsylvania, Daniel Janzen, Winnie Hallwachs


How to Talk with a Conspiracy Theorist: What the Experts Recommend

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JpInOs1Fyno Why do people pledge allegiance to views that seem fundamentally hostile to reality? Maybe believers in shadowy, evil forces and secret cabals fall prey to motivated reasoning. Truth for them is what they need to believe in order to get what they want. Their certainty in the justness of a cause can feel as comforting as a warm blanket on a winter’s night. But conspiracy theories go farther than private delusions of grandeur. They have spilled i...
Tags: Psychology, Google, Politics, College, Current Affairs, Reddit, University of Pennsylvania, Vox, Bill Nye, Daniel, Facebook Twitter, Pew Research, Josh Jones, University of California Irvine, Cass Sunstein, MIT Technology Review


How to Talk with a Conspiracy Theorist (and Why People Believe Conspiracy Theories in the First Place): What the Experts Recommend

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JpInOs1Fyno Why do people pledge allegiance to views that seem fundamentally hostile to reality? Maybe believers in shadowy, evil forces and secret cabals fall prey to motivated reasoning. Truth for them is what they need to believe in order to get what they want. Their certainty in the justness of a cause can feel as comforting as a warm blanket on a winter’s night. But conspiracy theories go farther than private delusions of grandeur. They have spilled i...
Tags: Psychology, Google, Politics, College, Current Affairs, Reddit, University of Pennsylvania, Vox, Bill Nye, Daniel, Facebook Twitter, Pew Research, Josh Jones, University of California Irvine, Cass Sunstein, MIT Technology Review


Researchers identify nanoparticles that could deliver therapeutic mRNA before birth

Researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the School of Engineering and Applied Science at the University of Pennsylvania have identified ionizable lipid nanoparticles that could be used to deliver mRNA as part of fetal therapy. The proof-of-concept study, published today in Science Advances, engineered and screened a number of lipid nanoparticle formulations for targeting mouse fetal organs and has laid the groundwork for testing potential therapies to treat genetic diseases before...
Tags: Science, Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania, Children s Hospital, School of Engineering


Scoring system to redefine how U.S. patients prioritized for liver transplant

Researchers with Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine are collaborating with faculty at the University of Pennsylvania to develop a risk score that more comprehensively prioritizes liver cancer patients for transplantation.
Tags: Science, University of Pennsylvania, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine


Youth with family history of suicide attempts have worse neurocognitive functioning

Children and adolescents with a family history of suicide attempts have lower executive functioning, shorter attention spans, and poorer language reasoning than those without a family history, according to a new study by researchers from the Lifespan Brain Institute (LiBI) of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the University of Pennsylvania. The study is the largest to date to examine the neurocognitive functioning of youth who have a biological relative who made a suicide attempt.
Tags: Science, Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania


12 affordable online classes that can help improve your mental health during the pandemic - from Yale's free positive psychology course to journaling and drawing prompts

When you buy through our links, we may earn money from our affiliate partners. Learn more. iStock; Gilbert Espinoza/Business Insider As the pandemic continues, many people can feel deeply isolated or worried about the future.Education can be a powerful tool in mental health management, and online platforms like Coursera, , LinkedIn Learning, and FutureLearn contain affordable courses that can help you feel better.The 12 courses outlined below hone in on specific topics within the field,...
Tags: UK, US, Trends, Yale, University of Pennsylvania, Coventry University, University Of Michigan, Patel, Kristin Neff, Blinkist, Karen Reivich, Amy Brann, LinkedIn Learning, Mental Health Awareness Week, Meera Lee Patel, Mara Leighton


What to say to a friend who's skeptical of getting the coronavirus vaccine

Ohio State employee Lauren Chisholm, left, receives a Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccination from Robert Weber AP Photo/Jay LaPrete The FDA has authorized two coronavirus vaccines for emergency use. Neither vaccine raised any major safety concerns in large clinical trials among diverse groups of volunteers. Here are nine reasons to be confident in the safety of these vaccines. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Around 5.3 million initial doses of the coronavirus vaccine have...
Tags: Hong Kong, Science, News, Cdc, Senate, US, Toronto, Trends, Features, Atlantic, Washington Dc, New York Times, National Institutes of Health, Columbia University, Philadelphia, Fda


Elon Musk is now the richest person in the world with a net worth of $187 billion. Here's how the Tesla and SpaceX CEO went from getting bullied as a child to becoming one of the most successful and controversial men in tech.

Elon Musk. Steve Nesius/Reuters Elon Musk has had a tumultuous yet successful life.  He was bullied as a child but ultimately attended an Ivy League university before going on to become the CEO of two companies, Tesla and SpaceX, and the founder of three more. He's also been married three times and has triplets and twins. He recently had another baby with his girlfriend, the musician Grimes.  But Musk also courts controversy, especially on Twitter. The tech billionaire has been outspoken a...
Tags: Transportation, Mark Zuckerberg, Spacex, Elon Musk, New York, Hollywood, Robert Downey Jr, Microsoft, Australia, California, Ebay, White House, Ipo, Time, US, Los Angeles


Philadelphia Residents On The Hook For $9.8 Million For Putting The Wrong Man In Prison For 28 Years (techdirt)

Plenty of people can ruin lives. But no one can ruin lives like cops and prosecutors. Look, we get it. Everyone likes an easy day at work. But when lives are on the line, the "easy" should be subservient to the "justified." But that's not what happens. When cops decide they like someone for a crime, "correct" is no longer a factor. You can't close a case file without a convicted perp. And closing a case apparently means more than being right, even if it means the real perp is still on the loos...
Tags: News, Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania, Center City, Philadelphia Inquirer, Wright, Paul Newman, Tim Cushing, Hollman, Anthony Wright, Jeremy Roebuck, Chester Hollman III


Delivering the news with humor makes young adults more likely to remember and share

Could the merging of humor and news actually help inform the public? New research from the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania and the School of Communication at Ohio State University found that young people were more likely to remember information about politics and government policy when it was conveyed in a humorous rather than non-humorous manner. They were also more willing to share the information online.
Tags: Science, University of Pennsylvania, Ohio State University, School of Communication, Annenberg School


Why you're not fully protected from COVID-19 after a single vaccine dose

Both Pfizer and Moderna'a COVID-19 vaccines require two shots, given weeks apart. Siphiwe Sibeko/Pool via AP Most COVID-19 vaccines are given as two shots, administered several weeks apart.  Protection does not start when the needle hits your arm.  It takes some days after each shot for the body to mount its own immune response to the novel coronavirus and prevent disease. Experts don't know exactly how protected from infection people are after their first shot, but there are signs of ...
Tags: UK, Science, California, Cdc, Kentucky, US, Alabama, Trends, Georgia, Healthcare, Astrazeneca, Cbs, Fda, University of Pennsylvania, Pfizer, Oxford University


The life of Donald Trump Jr., who once lived out of a truck, didn't speak to his father for a year, and spent 2020 campaigning with his girlfriend

Donald Trump Jr., 42, is President Donald Trump's eldest child. Andy Cross/MediaNews Group/The Denver Post / Getty Donald Trump Jr., eldest son of President Donald Trump, is an executive vice president of the Trump Organization. The 43-year-old, who has five children, has lived the majority of his life in the shadow of his father and younger sister Ivanka, but since his dad became president, his outspoken, anti-political-correct stance has come into its own. While Ivanka and his father...
Tags: Facebook, New York Post, Florida, Politics, Usa, New York, London, News, Abc, Washington Post, Washington, Life, White House, Russia, New York City, America


The UK is making a risky bet to stretch its supply of coronavirus vaccines, and scientists are split on the untested strategy

Paula McMahon prepares a shot of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine. Jeff J Mitchell/Pool via AP UK officials announced Tuesday that they would prioritize getting people their first doses of coronavirus vaccines instead of holding enough to ensure they can get a second dose on time. Pfizer's coronavirus vaccine is supposed to be given as two injections 21 days apart. The new guidelines allow people to wait up to 12 weeks between receiving their first and second doses. The UK is the first...
Tags: UK, US, Trends, Healthcare, University of Pennsylvania, Pfizer, Usa Today, Centers For Disease Control And Prevention, US Food and Drug Administration, Gottlieb, Paul Offit, Scott Gottlieb, Pandemic, BioNtech, Stanley Plotkin, Plotkin


As COVID-19 ravages US, shootings, killings are also up

By COREY WILLIAMS | Associated Press When Andre Avery drives his commercial truck through Detroit, he keeps his pistol close. Avery, 57, grew up in the Motor City and is aware that homicides and shootings are surging, even though before the pandemic they were dropping in Detroit and elsewhere. His gun is legal, and he carries it with him for protection. “I remain extremely alert,” said Avery, who now lives in nearby Belleville. “I’m not in crowds. If something looks a little suspicious, I’m out ...
Tags: New York, Crime, News, Minneapolis, Washington, Milwaukee, US, Sport, Chicago, Soccer, Philadelphia, Associated Press, University of Pennsylvania, Avery, Donald Trump, Detroit


Gut cells sound the alarm when parasites invade

When the parasite Cryptosporidium enters the body, it's cells in the intestines that first recognize the invader, triggering an early immune response, according to a new study led by a team from the University of Pennsylvania. A leading cause of diarrheal disease in young children globally, the parasite generates an inflammatory response beginning in the intestines that exacerbates the effects of malnutrition.
Tags: Science, University of Pennsylvania


Women & Literature: Toni Morrison

Toni Morrison earned a reputation as one of the most respected novelists in American and world literature and as one of the most influential figures in the world of letters. Morrison challenged herself in each of her novels to explore the power and sense of self that can emerge from directly confronting one’s communal and personal histories. She proudly asserted that she has progressed through “the four stages in the life of a minority writer”: an initial stage of anger, then self-discovery, whi...
Tags: Books, Featured, Kentucky, America, New York Times, Literature, University of Pennsylvania, Toni Morrison, Random House, Morrison, Garner, Georgetown, Cincinnati Ohio, Sula, Solomon, LORAIN Ohio


What life in 2021 will look like

Skye Gould/Insider Business Insider tapped eight leading COVID-19 experts across the US to create a best guess for what 2021 will be like. The good news is that life with the virus is almost certain to get better in 2021. But you will still need to wear a mask, social distance, and take other precautions, as it becomes safer to gather again. Here is Business Insider's timeline for the year ahead. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. No one knows exactly what life will look ...
Tags: Science, Brown University, US, Trends, Joe Biden, Features, Healthcare, 2022, Philadelphia Eagles, University of Pennsylvania, Pfizer, Eagles, Omaha Nebraska, Harvard Medical School, Popescu, Regeneron


'I'm absolutely terrified for Christmas': Nurses say they're bracing for record-shattering COVID-19 hospitalizations after the holidays

A medical staff member Stephanie takes a short nap in nursing station in the COVID-19 intensive care unit (ICU) at the United Memorial Medical Center on December 14, 2020 in Houston, Texas. Go Nakamura/Getty Images Nurses told Business Insider they expect COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations to spike after Christmas, much like they did after Thanksgiving. More than 47,000 Americans have died of COVID-19 since Thanksgiving. Smartphone data showed 13% of Americans traveled more than 31 miles ...
Tags: Amazon, Facebook, Australia, California, US, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Trends, Chicago, Food And Drug Administration, Michigan, Fda, University of Pennsylvania, Pfizer, Centers For Disease Control And Prevention, American Journal of Infection Control


Will coronavirus vaccines work against new variant? University of Pennsylvania doctor weighs in

The new variant or mutation to the coronavirus reported in the United Kingdom is prompting new questions, like will the vaccine still work?
Tags: United Kingdom, University of Pennsylvania


Community burden of COVID-19 linked to survival rates of hospitalized patients

High rates of COVID-19 in the county where a hospital is located appears to reduce survival rates among hospitalized patients with the virus, according to a new study from researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and at UnitedHealth Group.
Tags: Health, University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, COVID


A Pioneering Medical Doctor Who was a Vet

From Wikipedia: Jane Hinton (1919–2003) was a pioneer in the study of bacterial antibiotic resistance and one of the first two African-American women to gain the degree of Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (1949). Prior to her veterinary medicine studies at the University of Pennsylvania, she had been a laboratory technician at Harvard, co-developing the Mueller-Hinton agar, a culture medium that is now commonly used to test bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics. She later practiced...
Tags: Wikipedia, Pets, Massachusetts, Harvard, Harvard University, University of Pennsylvania, Hinton, PBurns, Terrierman, Mueller Hinton, Jane Hinton, William Augustus Hinton


8 organization and wellness tips for balancing career and family while working from home, according to well-being experts

Getty Images Professional women are facing even more challenges during the pandemic, say well-being experts and authors Liz Koehler and Clare Davenport. At the University of Pennsylvania, they conducted research into the unique macro and micro transitions faced by women in their careers and their impact on overall job satisfaction and quality of work. Koehler and Davenport found that creating unapologetic boundaries, working in an uplifting environment, and investing wisely in friendships...
Tags: Wellness, Opinion, Trends, Strategy, Work Life Balance, Research, Ibm, Goldman Sachs, University of Pennsylvania, Rembrandt, Shakespeare, Well-being, Blackrock, Nordic, Working Moms, Don


Ultra-fast gas flows through tiniest holes in 2D membranes

Researchers from the National Graphene Institute at the University of Manchester and the University of Pennsylvania have identified ultra-fast gas flows through the tiniest holes in one-atom-thin membranes, in a study published in Science Advances .
Tags: Science, University of Pennsylvania, University of Manchester, National Graphene Institute


As a TEFL-certified teacher, here are the 12 online courses and apps I recommend for learning English as a new language

When you buy through our links, we may earn money from our affiliate partners. Learn more. Alyssa Powell/Business Insider English is the world's most common second language, and learning it can open up new career opportunities.Below are 12 online courses, apps, and resources to improve your English listening, reading, writing, and speaking skills.Read more: The 8 best apps, courses, and books to start learning SpanishSign up for Insider Reviews' weekly newsletter for more buying advice a...
Tags: Reviews, Facebook, Education, Germany, US, Trends, Georgia, Features, Career Development, University of Pennsylvania, Coursera, Duolingo, Online Learning, E-learning, Tefl, Online Classes


FDA expert panel endorses Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine, clearing the way for regulators to green-light the shot

Moderna; Samantha Lee/Business Insider An influential Food and Drug Administration expert panel voted Thursday in favor of authorizing Moderna's coronavirus vaccine. The FDA isn't required to follow the group's advice but often does so. The agency could OK Moderna's shot on Friday, according to media reports. Twenty of the 21 committee members voted yes, and one panelist abstained.  If the vaccine gets the FDA's regulatory go-ahead, the government plans to ship 5.9 million doses of Modern...
Tags: UK, Science, News, Cdc, Stanford, US, Trends, Data, Features, Alaska, Healthcare, Food And Drug Administration, National Institutes of Health, Fda, University of Pennsylvania, Pfizer


FDA expert panel endorses Moderna's COVID-19 vaccine, clearing the way for regulators to greenlight the shot

Moderna; Samantha Lee/Business Insider An influential FDA expert panel voted Thursday in favor of authorizing Moderna's coronavirus vaccine.  The US Food and Drug Administration isn't required to follow the group's advice, but often does so. The agency could OK Moderna's shot on Friday, according to media reports. Twenty of the 21 committee members voted yes, and one panelist abstained.  If the vaccine gets the FDA's regulatory go-ahead, the government plans to ship 5.9 million doses of M...
Tags: UK, Science, News, Cdc, Stanford, US, Trends, Data, Features, Alaska, New York Times, Healthcare, Fda, University of Pennsylvania, Pfizer, Biotech


9 things to say to a friend who's skeptical of getting the coronavirus vaccine

Ohio State employee Lauren Chisholm, left, receives a Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccination from Robert Weber AP Photo/Jay LaPrete The FDA authorized the coronavirus vaccine from Pfizer and BioNTech for emergency use on Friday. Moderna's coronavirus vaccine is likely to be next. Neither vaccine raised any major safety concerns in large clinical trials among diverse groups of volunteers. Here are nine reasons to be confident in the safety of these vaccines. Visit Business Insider's homepage ...
Tags: Hong Kong, Science, News, Cdc, Senate, US, Toronto, Trends, Features, Atlantic, Washington Dc, New York Times, Food And Drug Administration, Columbia University, Philadelphia, Fda