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Looking Far to the Future: San Marco - The Basilica of Venice in the Third Millennium

Sala del Maggior Consiglio - Great Council Chamber - Photo: Cat Bauer (Venice, Italy) Power. Glory. Wealth. The sheer magnificence of the Great Council Chamber inside Palazzo Ducale is overwhelming. The immense hall was where the noblemen of the Great Council of the Venetian Republic convened, the 1,000 to 2,000 aristocrats who composed the most important political body of Venice and who were the guardians of the laws of State. The Great Council met for the first time in the Sala del Magg...
Tags: Travel, Rome, Munich, West, Venice, Istanbul, San Marco, East, Aachen, Basilica, Sala, Constantinople, Roman Empire, Hagia Sophia, University of Cologne, Venetian Republic


Looking to the Future: San Marco - The Basilica of Venice in the Third Millennium

Sala del Maggior Consiglio - Great Council Chamber - Photo: Cat Bauer (Venice, Italy) Power. Glory. Wealth. The sheer magnificence of the Great Council Chamber inside Palazzo Ducale is overwhelming. The immense hall was where the noblemen of the Great Council of the Venetian Republic convened, the 1,000 to 2,000 aristocrats who composed the most important political body of Venice and who were the guardians of the laws of State. The Great Council met for the first time in the Sala del Magg...
Tags: Travel, Rome, Munich, West, Venice, Istanbul, San Marco, East, Aachen, Basilica, Sala, Constantinople, Roman Empire, Hagia Sophia, University of Cologne, Venetian Republic


A performance of Vivaldi's La Senna festeggiante by Arcangelo

In 1726 on 25 August, Jacques-Vincent Languet, Comte de Gergy, the new French ambassador to the Venetian Republic held a celebration for the name day of King Louis XV of France. There was a new piece of music performed in the loggia at the foot of Languet's garden with an audience of diplomats and, watching from gondolas, Venetian nobles.
Tags: France, Religion, Vivaldi, Louis XV, Venetian Republic, Arcangelo, Jacques Vincent Languet Comte de Gergy, Languet


Ocean Space throws Open the Doors of the Ancient Church of San Lorenzo in Venice

Ocean Space - Moving Off the Land by Joan Jonas (Venice, Italy) The Church of San Lorenzo, a towering structure with exposed bricks and no elaborate facade, sat alone and closed for more than a century except for a few temporary installations. For years, stray cats were its only friends. Its roof was leaking and there was a gaping hole in the floor. The current church was built in 1592-1602, and deconsecrated in 1810 after the invasion of Napoleon's troops and the fall of the Venetian Rep...
Tags: Travel, Venice, Marco Polo, San Lorenzo, Napoleon, Venetian Republic, Biennale, Luigi Nono, Venetian Cat - Venice Blog, Joan Jonas, Ocean Space, Joan Jonas Venice Italy The Church, Ariel Guzik, Ocean Space at Church


THE ORIGINAL: "Making a Good Impressionist - Going Undercover as Van Gogh, a Mask Maker Rediscovers Anonymity in Venice" by Cat Bauer

Mask Maker Sergio Boldrin leads parade in Piazza San Marco for "Beheading of the Bull" during Venice Carnival 2019 Photo: Cat Bauer (Venice, Italy) After discovering that my article "Venice Carnival 2017 and a Brief History of Mask-Making" that I had first published on this blog in 2008 had been plagiarized, we have finally dug up the original print newspaper article. I had written a feature entitled "Making a Good Impressionist - Going Undercover as Van Gogh, a Mask Maker Rediscovers Anony...
Tags: Travel, Florida, Vogue, Italy, Venice, Carnival, Harper, Bazaar, Naples, Arles, Napoleon, Van Gogh, Carlo Goldoni, Sergio, Venice Italy, Palm Beach


Venice books - Two terrific historical thrillers by local author Gregory Dowling

The Four Horsemen by Gregory Dowling (Venice, Italy) Since my Venice blog readers are passionate about La Serenissima and all her intrigues, and appreciate history, art and culture -- and are very smart -- I have a couple of book recommendations that are right up your calle. The books are also great for people who simply are looking for a good read.Venice's own Gregory Dowling has begun a series of historical thrillers starring Alvise Marangon, a likeable cicerone, or tour guide, who beco...
Tags: Travel, Amazon, Europe, England, Oxford, Venice, Mark Twain, Gregory, Andrea, Venice Italy, Francesco, Venetian Republic, Dowling, La Serenissima, Venetian Cat - Venice Blog, Palazzo Ducale


Venice Secrets - Crime & Justice - Instruments of Death and Torture at Palazzo Zaguri

Venice Secrets at Palazzo Zaguri - Photo: Cat Bauer (Venice, Italy) There are some nasty instruments of torture on view at Palazzo Zaguri, Venice's newest museum smack in the center of town in Campo San Maurizio. Don't be mislead. "Venice Secrets" is not a bloodthirsty exhibition, nor are all the torture devices from Venice. Rather, it is a device to draw you inside, and treat you to an fascinating lesson in history backed up by documents newly released by the State Archive of Venice abou...
Tags: Travel, United States, Italy, Venice, Michael Wolff, Archives, Lions, Mozart, Giotto, Santa Maria, Venetian Republic, Giacomo Casanova, Columbia College, Da Ponte, Casanova, Inquisition


Happy New Year from Venice 2018 - Who was Saint Trovaso?

Campo entrance - Church of San Trovaso - Photo: Cat Bauer (Venice, Italy) The Church of San Trovaso is so named because Venetians mashed the names of two saints together: the twin brothers, San Gervasio and San Protasio, patron saints of Milan. Gervasio and Protasio came from an aristocratic Milanese family in the first or second century -- some say during the time of Nero -- when being a Christian was a dangerous thing. The details are sketchy, but both their parents were also saints: th...
Tags: Travel, Donald Sutherland, Madonna, Venice, Legend, Don, Campo, Nero, Castellani, Venetian Republic, Castello, Valeria, Venetian Cat - Venice Blog, San Gervasio, Church of San, Cat Bauer Venice Italy The Church of San Trovaso


When Venice's Loot Came Back from France - Canova, Hayez & Cicognara at the Galleria Accademia

Horse of St. Mark's plaster copy - Photo: Cat Bauer (Venice, Italy) When Napoleon forced the Venetian Republic to surrender on May 12, 1797 and ended the 1000-year-old realm of La Serenissima, his soldiers hauled a lot of loot back to France -- the most cherished being the four bronze horses on the outside of Saint Mark's Basilica, dating from antiquity. In 1205, Venice herself had plundered the four horses from Constantinople, capital of the Roman Empire and Christian civilization. Napol...
Tags: Travel, Europe, Milan, France, Rome, Austria, Vienna, Paris, Italy, Harry, Venice, Bavaria, Academy, Bologna, Waterloo, Napoleon


Did you know there are Royal Gardens in Venice? You will soon!

Cynthia Pre݁fointaine, Vista aerea dell'Area Marciana, Venezia, 2015 (Venice, Italy) The Royal Gardens of Venice are hidden in plain sight. If you start at Harry's Bar and walk along the water of the Bacino di San Marco to Piazza San Marco, the gardens are on the left. But many people pass them by because they are in such a state of disrepair -- there is not much greenery beckoning you to come inside and enjoy a bit of nature. All of that is about to change.I was privileged to be invited ...
Tags: Travel, France, Harry, Venice, Sissi, Napoleon, Piazza, San Marco, Rose, Andrea, Don, Lucia, Royal Palace, Piazza San Marco, Generali, Assicurazioni Generali


Venice Carnival 2017 and A Brief History of Mask-Making

Sergio Boldrin of La Bottega dei Mascareri (Venice, Italy)  Venice is a unique city. Built on the water, tucked safely inside her own lagoon, Venice was once the center of international trade, as well as the publishing industry. The ruling mercantile aristocracy were seafarers, enormously wealthy, and competed with each other to build the most magnificent palaces filled with lush furnishings, art and tapestries. Venetians are good with a boat.Venetians had their own peculiar customs like ...
Tags: Travel, Vogue, Italy, Venice, Carnival, Harper, Napoleon, Carlo Goldoni, Sergio, Rialto, Sergio Boldrin, Rialto Bridge, Venetian Republic, St Mark s Square, Venetian Cat - Venice Blog, Pietro Longhi


What Biographer Laurence Bergreen Learned from Casanova

The most notorious libertine in history was Casanova, whose memoirs fill a dozen volumes with travel, adventure, and stories of more than 100 sexual encounters in rapturous detail. He was also a mathematician who established the French lottery that is still going today and a playwright. He escaped from prison and was befriended by Voltaire, Mozart, and Catherine the Great. Laurence Bergreen's new biography, Casanova: The World of a Seductive Genius, is sexy, surprising, funny, insightful, and wi...
Tags: Europe, England, News, Germany, Russia, Paris, Venice, Marco Polo, Columbus, Catherine, Huffington Post, Louvre, Magellan, Francesco, Nell Minow, Boswell


Glory Days When Knights Rode the Earth - Venice Flashback Summer!

Bartolomeo Colleoni by Andrea Verrocchio - Photo: Wolfgang Moroder (Venice, Italy) To pick a Flashback Summer! post, I've gone all the way back to the beginning of this blog, to March 16, 2008, more than eight years ago. At that point in time, the terrorists were Al-Qaeda, and Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton were still slugging it out -- the Democratic National Convention would not take place until August 25, 2008, the day after the Olympics in Beijing concluded, and a week before the Re...
Tags: Travel, England, Milan, Barack Obama, Beijing, Hillary Clinton, Italy, Al Qaeda, Pope, Venice, John Mccain, Republic, Duke, San Marco, Sarah Palin, Venice Italy


The Merchant of Venice in Venice, Italy

The Merchant of Venice at Hotel Danieli - Photo by Mirco Toffolo (Venice, Italy) When William Shakespeare wrote The Merchant of Venice around 1596-98, a Jew had not lived legally in England for more than 300 years, and the Jews in Venice had been consigned to the ghetto. So when Shylock, a Jewish money-lender, demands a pound of flesh after a Venetian merchant defaults on a loan, Shakespeare knew he was dropping his characters into dynamite, a setting which still raises explosive issu...
Tags: Travel, Europe, England, Israel, New York Times, Italy, William Shakespeare, Portsmouth, Venice, Lincoln Center, Shakespeare, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Edward, Al Pacino, Venice Italy, Pryce


Giusti Gardens, Verona, Italy

Winter is holding spring hostage in Paris in the last few days. Yesterday the high temperature was 48 degrees Fahrenheit and at one point there were snow showers. Last night it dipped down to 37 degrees. Brrrrrr!  I am still wearing my heavy sweater, down coat and a hat. Rather than protest the hostage situation, my thoughts turned to summer. I was inspired by a post on Instagram about the beautiful Giusti Gardens in Verona, Italy which I visited last summer but never wrote about. When I ...
Tags: Travel, Outdoors, Europe, Instagram, Etsy, Architecture, Paris, Italy, Eiffel Tower, Verona, Gardens, Parks, Tuscany, Charlotte, Blair, Verona Italy


Cowslip Workshop ~ Easter Exhibition (Part Two)

Susan Denton, the third quilter exhibiting at Cowslip over Easter, is an Australian quilter now living in Cornwall who, finding inspiration in the landscape, has translated her love for her surroundings into her quilts.  Mapping walks and footpaths is something I have been doing with the Beating the Bounds project on here, and finally I have settled down with the 1841 tithe map and the accompanying documents to try and make something fabric-related. It is happening slowly, and thank heavens the...
Tags: Cornwall, Venice, Susan, Venetian Republic, Dovegreyreader, Arts & Crafts, Bookhound, Mostly Knitting, Some Quilting, Cowslip, Susan Denton, Wordsworth Ode, Picasa Pencil, Jo Colwill


The Venice synagogue at the heart of the world’s first ghetto

The 16th-century Schola Grande Tedesca is worth a visit for its extraordinary interior but, as the arts writer discovers, also for what it reveals about the history of the Jewish community in EuropeThis is one of the oddest spaces I’ve ever been in. The geometry is unique: it is a trapezoid tapering toward two windows, softened above by the elliptical women’s gallery which Silvia, our guide, tells us was added in a later restoration.I’m on a tour of some of the five synagogues remaining in the c...
Tags: Travel, Venice, City Breaks, Weekend Breaks, Short breaks, Europe Holidays, Italy Holidays, Venice Holidays, Silvia, Venetian Republic, Ghetto Novo


500 years of the Venetian ghetto: commemoration and history

Venice will commemorate the world’s first ghetto with exhibitions and events, but it’s also possible to learn about its history through walks, tours and food, explains the author of a new guide to the cityOn 29 March 1516, the Venetian Republic created the first ghetto on a small island in the north-western sestiere of Cannaregio. The residents were removed and replaced within a week by Jews already in Venice. This was a period in which the city sought to keep a watchful eye on all foreigners: t...
Tags: Travel, Culture, Heritage, Venice, Cultural Trips, Europe Holidays, Italy Holidays, Venice Holidays, Canton, Cannaregio, Venetian Republic, Alice Becker Ho


Pigalle

Pigalle refers for most of us to an area just south of Montmartre, on the border between the 18th and 9th arrondissements in Paris, and we think rather of something like this. We should however remember that this area somehow informally got its name from Place Pigalle and the street rue Jean-Baptiste Pigalle , already in 1803 named after the sculptor with this name who lived in this street and who is one of the few buried at the little Calvaire cemetery on top of Montmar...
Tags: Paris, Francis, Montmartre, Voltaire, Saint Mary, Venetian Republic, Delacroix, Pigalle, Diderot, Peter Olson, Paris 18, Place Pigalle, Paris 6, Paris 9, Saint-Sulpice Church, rue Jean Baptiste Pigalle


The History of Croatia – a summary

Zagreb Cathedral, founded in the 11th century, but now a 13th century Gothic edifice with multiple alterations over the centuries… Peter Sommer Travels has recently announced its first ever cruise in Croatia: Cruising the Coast of Dalmatia. The trip, as all our tours, is the outcome of careful and painstaking preparation. We make sure that the things and places we show you are the best, most informative or most beautiful there is in the areas we travel, that you have the best guides available, ...
Tags: Europe, France, Kingdom, Eu, Rome, Austria, Vienna, Hungary, Italy, Serbia, Croatia, Venice, Syracuse, Roma, South, Mediterranean


Celebrating Carnevale in the Italian Language

Carnevale Carnival There’s no time like Carnevale in Italy. The roots of this tradition go back to the ancient Roman Saturnalia, which marked the transition from winter to spring. Early Christians may have rejected pagan rites, but they preserved the exuberant celebrations that brightened the darkest, coldest months of the year. The name “Carnevale” comes from the Latin for meat (carnem) and “take away or remove” (levare). A church decree dating back to 653 declared that anyone who ate meat dur...
Tags: Travel, Books, Fashion, Games, Milan, History, Culture, Web/Tech, Weblogs, Language, Italy, Food And Drink, Venice, Carnival, Tuscany, Emilia Romagna


Venice at Carnegie

Carnegie Hall has announced a handsomely varied 2016-17 season. There are quite a few notable events — a new Steve Reich piece, Pulse; a Barenboim marathon of Bruckner symphonies and Mozart concertos; the Boston Symphony playing George Benjamin's Dream of the Song; the St. Louis playing John Adams's Gospel According to the Other Mary; some finely curated Simon Rattle programs — but the centerpiece is a sprawling celebration of the music and culture of the Venetian Republic. I haven't been so co...
Tags: New York, Steve Reich, Venice, John Adams, St Louis, Vivaldi, Mozart, Simon Rattle, Alex Ross, Carnegie Hall, Carnegie, Barenboim, Tenet, Bruckner, Boston Symphony, George Benjamin


An Art-Filled Weekend itinerary in Venice

Imagine losing yourself in the maze of watery canals and cobblestoned lanes, or indulging in a romantic gondola tour with sweet melodies. Think about the chance to visit the most important cultural sites, admire works of art by some of the greatest artists in the world, as well as getting lost in the less visited quarters, sestieri and streets known only to the locals. Or picture yourself cruising along the Grand Canal or visiting the Lido where you can feel like a movie star. Do these activitie...
Tags: Europe, Instagram, Egypt, Italy, Madonna, Michelin, Venice, Saints, Murano, Alexandria, San Marco, Grand Canal, Mark, Mary, Gus, Basilica