Posts filtered by tags: Walt Whitman[x]


 

Amy Klobuchar hears America singing.

She's getting snow covered and quoting Walt Whitman as she announces her candidacy...The event is over now, so I've taken down the link to the live feed. I didn't get to hear much of the speech, but the heavy snowfall was a fantastic touch. Loved it. And loved the quoting of Whitman. She recited the first line of the poem that I'll reprint in full:I hear America singing, the varied carols I hear,Those of mechanics, each one singing his as it should be blithe and strong,The carpenter singing his ...
Tags: Law, America, Snow, Amy Klobuchar, Jeff Bezos, Whitman, Walt Whitman, Ann Althouse, Whitman She


LGBTQ landmarks

From the very first queer magazine to significant protests for LGBTQ freedom of expression, there are a number of buildings around the United States that are still standing as testaments to the history of the LGBTQIA+ community. Though it seems now like a world so far out of our grasp, there was once a time when members of the queer community could not even assemble for a few beers in peace. In fact, in a not-so-distant past, “social justice” did not appear to be in the realm of possibility f...
Tags: Travel, California, Washington, Germany, Lgbt, New York City, US, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Chicago, United States, Washington Dc, Columbia University, Lgbtq, Jackson, Truman Capote


Is $3,000 Too Much For a Camera?

I really wonder about this. On the one hand, I've been "cash strapped" most of my life and I think $3k is a huge amount of money to spend for a camera, verging on "outrageous." On the other hand, I've done it. Never actually $3k+ on a single body exclusively I guess, but close, and I've bought a $3k camera and lens, or one body plus a second backup body, or an outfit. Not once but several times. I regret almost all of those purchases—all but one that I can think of—and I wish I had most of that ...
Tags: Photography, America, Alaska, Italy, Brian, Lulu, Seattle, San Francisco Bay, Peter Wright, Photo Equipment, Michael Johnston, Don, Mike, Joseph, Michael C Johnston, Geoff Wittig


The Top 6 Medical Inventions During the Civil War

The war saw over 600,000 dead500,000 were woundedThis created a massive need for inventions of various kinds and a rapid advancement in medicineThere were several things newly invented during the Civil War that became keys to saving lives, as well as taking them. The Gatling Gun and repeating rifles, both invented just before or during the war, became quite effective at slaughter, as well as producing wounded men in unprecedented numbers. Because such a devastating and massive war usually genera...
Tags: France, Virginia, War, Medical Research, United States, Innovation, Army, Invention, Lincoln, Illinois, Bull Run, Abraham Lincoln, Hanger, Manassas, Fort Sumter, Walt Whitman


6 top medical inventions created during the Civil War

The war resulted in more than 600,000 deaths.About 500,000 were wounded.The war created a massive need for inventions of various kinds and led to rapid advancement in medicineThere were several things newly invented during the Civil War that became keys to saving lives, as well as taking them. The Gatling Gun and repeating rifles, both invented just before or during the war, became quite effective at slaughter, as well as producing wounded men in unprecedented numbers. Because such a devastating...
Tags: France, Virginia, War, Medical Research, United States, Innovation, Army, Invention, Union, Lincoln, Illinois, Bull Run, Abraham Lincoln, Hanger, Manassas, Fort Sumter


'Garage': A Visually and Intellectually Rich Study of a Seemingly Blank Space

None The garage, at first glance, makes for a mundane symbol. And yet, Americans have imbued this deceptively "blank space" with a great deal of meaning. Even so, they may not fully understand that meaning, or its limitations. Olivia Erlanger and Luis Ortega Govela's book, a work of cultural studies, attempts to analyze the significance of the garage (i.e., the theoretical and material implications of the structure). They argue that Garage, an extension of their essay, Hate Suburbia: The Conspi...
Tags: Apple, Art, Feature, Music, Disney, Chicago, Courtney Love, Barbie, Kevin Spacey, Garage, Kurt Cobain, Rand, Frank Lloyd Wright, Mattel, Wright, Federal Housing Administration


Paper chase: When Walt Whitman Was Dying, It Was Front-Page News — for Months

After the beloved poet caught a chill in December 1891, The Times kept a literary bedside vigil until his death on March 26, 1892.
Tags: News, Times, Walt, Whitman, Walt Whitman, Books and Literature, Poetry and Poets, Leaves of Grass (Book


Variety is the Spice of Leadership

Wouldn’t it be great if chocolate was one of the four food groups? Maybe my preference to see that happen (*smile*) is why the topic of 31 flavors keeps popping into how I think about success, civility, inclusion, leadership, and respect. I worked in corporate America for lots of years. When I look back at that time, I see how all the places where I worked managed by one flavor. That flavor was numbers, results, and the bottom line. Because I was ambitious, I was complicit and played along in pl...
Tags: Leadership, America, Teamwork, Collaboration, Barry Johnson, Walt Whitman, Tolerance, Blind Spots, Leadership Lessons, Spice of Leadership


Mangled Body and Depraved Soul: On the Corporeal and the Spiritual in the Works of Edgar Allan Poe

None Reviled by some (T.S. Eliot and Henry James among others) as lacking in seriousness and skill, consigned by others to the rank of "children's author" alongside Mark Twain and Robert Louis Stevenson, and revered by others (primarily the French decadents such as Charles Baudelaire but also Walt Whitman) for his penchant for the lurid, the sickly, and the accursed, Edgar Allan Poe remains a troubling figure for American literature. Despite the philosophical heft brought to readings of some of...
Tags: Feature, Music, Hollywood, Poetry, Edgar Allan Poe, Vincent Price, Stories, Charles Dickens, John, Annie, Mark Twain, Smith, Robert Louis Stevenson, Henry James, Aristotle, Poe


TheEpochTimes.com: Florence Price & Margaret Bonds on "Songs of Chicago" CD

Florence B. Price (1887-1953) Margaret Bonds (1913-1972) The Epoch Times November 10, 2018 Thomas Hampson sheds light on forgotten black composers By Barry Bassis The best of new albums recently released by classical singers is Thomas Hampson’s “Songs from Chicago,” on Cedille Records, an unusual label that records only Chicago composers. Hampson is America’s leading baritone and is not only a star of opera but also a dedicated singer an...
Tags: New York, Religion, America, Chicago, Bonds, Florence, Rabindranath Tagore, Langston Hughes, Walt Whitman, Hampson, Thomas Hampson, William J Zick, Margaret Bonds, Cedille Records, Florence Price amp, Barry Bassis


When Brave Men Shudder: The Scottish origins of Dracula – review

Author: Mike Shepherd First Published: 2018 The Blurb : Gripped by the demon of inspiration, he entered into the mind of the infamous Count Dracula… The year: 1895. The place: a remote Scottish fishing village. Bram Stoker is feverishly penning his cadaverous tale of vampire horror as his family look on aghast. Everything was conspiring to produce those words of gore... everything. What were the supernatural influences he found in the village? Who was the mystic poet who dominated his restles...
Tags: Amazon, Movies, Bram Stoker, Aberdeenshire, Shepherd, Dracula, Amazon UK, Walt Whitman, Stoker, Reference - Folklore, Reference - Media, Mike Shepherd, Cruden Bay, Dracula (related, Slains Castle, Slains


Thought for the day, Nov. 6, 2018

Walt Whitman (Photo by Mathew Brady/National Archives and Records Administrative) Walt Whitman, American essayist, journalist and poet “I know of nothing grander, better exercise, better digestion, ore positive proof of the past, the triumphant result of faith in human kind, than a well-contested American National election.” (from “Democratic Vistas,” 1871) May 31, 1819-March 26, 1892 Related Articles Thought for the day, Nov. 5, 2018 Though...
Tags: Sport, Soccer, Local News, San Fernando Valley, Walt Whitman, Thought For The Day, American National


For Election Day 2018

did you? Photo by troye owens Note from CM: It’s election day here in the U.S., as citizens go to the polls to vote in the midterms — the elections between our quadrennial presidential decision. Here is a simple reminder from over a century ago of the humble grandeur of this privilege we participate in as Americans. • • • If I should need to name, O Western World, your powerfulest scene and show, ‘Twould not be you, Niagara — nor you, ye limitless prairies — nor your huge rifts of canyons, C...
Tags: Mississippi, Oregon, Religion, America, Yellowstone, Huron, Walt Whitman, Poetry or Lyrics


Poetic

“The scent of vaping perfumes the Brooklyn air. A night chill causes the leaves to begin their silent descent, commingling on the pavement with the unnoticed bits of human rubbish.” Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass [Author: [email protected] (kane)]
Tags: Art, Brooklyn, Walt Whitman


When Walt Whitman Reported for The New York Times

To supplement his salary, the famed poet worked as a freelance journalist and provided looks inside military hospitals during the Civil War.
Tags: News, New York Times, Walt, Whitman, Walt Whitman, Southern States (US, Civil War (US) (1861-65, Poetry and Poets


How “Hair” Changed Theatre In London Sixty Years Ago

Prior to the autumn of 1968, any reference to homosexuality, bisexuality and nude performances would have been considered too outrageous to be shown on a British stage. Even something as seemingly harmless as a reference to Walt Whitman’s poetry collection, Leaves of Grass, in John Osborne’s play Personal Enemy, was banned because it was seen as a codified reference to homosexuality.
Tags: Art, London, Theatre, John Osborne, Walt Whitman, 09.27.18


How “Hair” Changed Theatre In London Fifty Years Ago

Prior to the autumn of 1968, any reference to homosexuality, bisexuality and nude performances would have been considered too outrageous to be shown on a British stage. Even something as seemingly harmless as a reference to Walt Whitman’s poetry collection, Leaves of Grass, in John Osborne’s play Personal Enemy, was banned because it was seen as a codified reference to homosexuality.
Tags: Art, London, Theatre, John Osborne, Walt Whitman, 09.27.18


A Noiseless Patient Spider

By Walt Whitman A noiseless patient spider, I mark’d where on a little promontory it stood isolated, Mark’d how to explore the vacant vast surrounding, It launch’d forth filament, filament, filament, out of itself, Ever unreeling them, ever tirelessly speeding them. And you O my soul...
Tags: Gardening, Mark, Walt Whitman, Vicki Lane


National Public Radio: George Walker, Trailblazing American Composer, Dies At 96

Composer George Walker takes a bow at a performance of his Pulitzer winning piece, Lilacs, in California in 1996. Luis Sinco/LA Times/Getty Images Deceptive Cadence NPR Classical Tom Huizenga August 24, 2018 Pulitzer Prize-winning composer, pianist and educator George Walker has died at the age of 96. Walker's death was announced to NPR by one of his family members, Karen Schaefer, who said he died Thursday at Moun...
Tags: California, Washington, Religion, Paris, Ohio, Philadelphia, Npr, West Indies, National Public Radio, Philadelphia Orchestra, Walker, Mumford, Howard University, Montclair, Oberlin College, Aaron Copland


The “Weird Objects” in the New York Public Library’s Collections: Virginia Woolf’s Cane, Charles Dickens’ Letter Opener, Walt Whitman’s Hair & More

On March 28, 1941, Virginia Woolf took her final walk, into the River Ouse near her home in Sussex. She did it with her trusty cane in hand, the very cane you can see laid out alongside other Woolf-related artifacts in the New Yorker video above. Its five minutes provide a short introduction to the "weird objects" of the New York Public Library's Berg Collection, an archive containing, in the words of the New Yorker's Gareth Smit, "roughly two thousand linear feet of manuscripts and archiva...
Tags: Google, College, History, Nypl, Literature, Charles Dickens, Charlotte Brontë, Mark Twain, Jack Kerouac, New York Public Library, Seoul, Virginia Woolf, Sussex, Vladimir Nabokov, Facebook Twitter, Nabokov


"The Nation Magazine Betrays a Poet — and Itself/I was the magazine’s poetry editor for 35 years. Never once did we apologize for publishing a poem."

Writes Grace Shulman (in the NYT).We followed a path blazed by Henry James, who in 1865 wrote a damning review of Walt Whitman’s “Drum Taps,” calling the great poem “arrant prose.” Mistaken, yes, but it was James’s view at the time. And it was never retracted....Last month, the magazine published a poem by Anders Carlson-Wee. The poet is white. His poem, “How-To,” draws on black vernacular.Following a vicious backlash against the poem on social media, the poetry editors, Stephanie Burt and Carme...
Tags: Law, Censorship, Poetry, Narcissism, Henry James, James, Apologies, The Nation, Whitman, Walt Whitman, Katha Pollitt, Political correctness, Ann Althouse, Racial Politics, Stephanie Burt, Grace Shulman


Michele Mendelssohn's Playlist for Her Book "Making Oscar Wilde"

In the Book Notes series, authors create and discuss a music playlist that relates in some way to their recently published book. Previous contributors include Jesmyn Ward, Lauren Groff, Bret Easton Ellis, Celeste Ng, T.C. Boyle, Dana Spiotta, Amy Bloom, Aimee Bender, Heidi Julavits, Hari Kunzru, and many others. Michele Mendelssohn's book Making Oscar Wilde offers an insightful look at Oscar Wilde through the lens of post-Civil War America. Eileen Myles wrote of the book: "One of the most...
Tags: Music, England, London, Virginia, US, America, Los Angeles, David, Atlantic, United States, Ireland, Arizona, David Bowie, Oscar, Jane Austen, Dublin


When Oscar Met Walt

The idea of Oscar Wilde meeting Walt Whitman face-to-face began as a publicity stunt for Wilde’s 1882 U.S. lecture tour. (The two were to ride together in an open carriage through the streets of Philadelphia. It was January and Whitman declined.) In fact, Wilde’s mother had read Leaves of Grass (in an unexpurgated version) to him when he was 11, and he had admired Whitman ever since, and he eventually went to visit his old hero at home. “No reporters were invited to witness the meeting between W...
Tags: Art, People, Philadelphia, Oscar Wilde, Wilde, Whitman, Walt Whitman, 07.16.18, Oscar Met Walt


For Walt Whitman's old Camden neighborhood, a bit of poetic justice

A grassroots group with a direct link to the 19th-century people who knew and loved the poet and his work has been pursuing its vision of making the house where he died into the centerpiece of a public attraction.
Tags: Camden, Incidents, Walt Whitman


Grace Notes: Seeking a Second Chance at Landmark Status, Aluminum Siding and All

Preservationists want landmark status for the house where Walt Whitman lived when “Leaves of Grass” was published. The designation was denied last year.
Tags: News, Landmarks Preservation Commission, Walt, Whitman, Walt Whitman, Books and Literature, Brooklyn (NYC, Historic Buildings and Sites, Historic Districts Council


RIP Oliver Knussen (1952-2018)

Oliver Knussen received an honorary doctorate from the RAM on 5 July 2018. Saddened to learn of the passing of composer and conductor Oliver Knussen. One of the truly great musicians of our time, Knussen had received an honorary doctorate from the Royal Academy of Music, where he was Richard Rodney Bennett Professor of Music, just a few days ago. A renowned pedagogue as well as a superlative conductor of contemporary music, Knussen held positions with such organizations as London Sinfonietta, A...
Tags: UK, Religion, Rip, Deaths, Composer, Conductor, Maurice Sendak, Royal Academy of Music, Aldeburgh, Walt Whitman, Contemporary Classical, Composers, Oliver Knussen, File Under, Knussen, Cbcarey


Drenched in words: LGBTQ poets from US history

John F. Kennedy stated that “When power narrows the areas of man’s concern, poetry reminds him of the richness and diversity of his existence. When power corrupts, poetry cleanses.” Poetry attempts to reclaim awareness of the world through language, an entirely human construct that can only be pushed so far but one that is pushed repeatedly and necessarily in order to articulate what it means to be human. Throughout American history, LGBTQ poets have explored myriad themes including identity, se...
Tags: Books, New York, Featured, US, America, History, Harvard, United States, Literature, John F Kennedy, Columbia University, Biographies, Brooklyn Bridge, Emily Dickinson, Bishop, Jim Crow


On Valedictions

As we drew near to the end of May, we end a month of graduations and commencement ceremonies. A whole new generation of young adults has been sent into the world with degrees in hand. A venerable tradition for universities today is to invite an important or well-known speaker to impart a word of wisdom to the fledgling scholars about to turn the tassels of their caps. Sometimes students themselves deliver a speech. Themes vary, but most often such addresses include a focus on one’s career, on do...
Tags: Featured, Religion, Friendship, Happiness, Graduation, Jesus, John, Christ, Jesus Christ, Thomas, Robert Frost, Walt Whitman, Faith & Spirituality, Dominicana, John Christ


Walt Whitman Got Rejected From 'The Atlantic' For Being Too Timely

That's right, "1861" was a little too 1861 to publish in 1861. "There’s something problematic about asking our art to be of the 'moment' (or declaring, after the fact, that it is), or demanding that it fit into one of two boxes: being about politics or an escape from it. Art is and should be […]
Tags: Art, Atlantic, Words, Walt Whitman, 05.31.18


New York Today: New York Today: A Studio That Helped Define That Brooklyn Look

Thursday: A prop house is priced out of Williamsburg, an evening of Japanese drumming, and Walt Whitman’s birthday.
Tags: New York, News, New York City, Williamsburg, Walt Whitman, Brooklyn Look