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When William Faulkner Set the World Record for Writing the Longest Sentence in Literature: Read the 1,288-Word Sentence from Absalom, Absalom!

Image by Carl Van Vechten, via Wikimedia Commons “How did Faulkner pull it off?” is a question many a fledgling writer has asked themselves while struggling through a period of apprenticeship like that novelist John Barth describes in his 1999 talk "My Faulkner." Barth “reorchestrated” his literary heroes, he says, “in search of my writerly self... downloading my innumerable predecessors as only an insatiable green apprentice can.” Surely a great many writers can relate when Barth says, “it was...
Tags: Google, Europe, Books, Maryland, Writing, College, Washington, Literature, Guinness Book of World Records, Lincoln, Sherman, Jonathan Coe, Jones, William Styron, Facebook Twitter, Beckett


When William Faulkner Set the World Record for Writing the Longest Sentence in Literature: 1,288 Words from Absalom, Absalom!

Image by Carl Van Vechten, via Wikimedia Commons “How did Faulkner pull it off?” is a question many a fledgling writer has asked themselves while struggling through a period of apprenticeship like that novelist John Barth describes in his 1999 talk "My Faulkner." Barth “reorchestrated” his literary heroes, he says, “in search of my writerly self... downloading my innumerable predecessors as only an insatiable green apprentice can.” Surely a great many writers can relate when Barth says, “it was...
Tags: Google, Europe, Books, Maryland, Writing, College, Washington, Literature, Guinness Book of World Records, Lincoln, Sherman, Jonathan Coe, Jones, William Styron, Facebook Twitter, Beckett


William Faulkner’s Review of Ernest Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea (1952)

Images via Wikimedia Commons In the mid-20th century, the two big dogs in the American literary scene were William Faulkner and Ernest Hemingway. Both were internationally revered, both were masters of the novel and the short story, and both won Nobel Prizes. Born in Mississippi, Faulkner wrote allegorical histories of the South in a style that is both elliptical and challenging. His works were marked by uses of stream-of-consciousness and shifting points of view. He also favored titanically lo...
Tags: Google, Books, Mississippi, Yahoo, College, Washington, Time, Los Angeles, New York Times, Paris, Hemingway, Ernest Hemingway, Facebook Twitter, Hollywood Reporter, Lee University, FAULKNER


Lady Gaga, Moss Hart & ‘What Price Hollywood?’

“The past is not dead. Actually, it’s not even past.” Owen Wilson’s character in Midnight in Paris (A rephrasing of a line from William Faulkner’s Requiem for a Nun) When I was 20 years old I took my first film history class and I don’t remember a single thing about it—except I dropped the class […]
Tags: Filmmaking, Paris, Owen Wilson, William Faulkner, Screenwriting, Lady Gaga Moss Hart


Behold The Drawings of Franz Kafka (1907-1917)

Runner 1907-1908 UK-born, Chicago-based artist Philip Hartigan has posted a brief video piece about Franz Kafka’s drawings. Kafka, of course, wrote a body of work, mostly never published during his lifetime, that captured the absurdity and the loneliness of the newly emerging modern world: In The Metamorphosis, Gregor transforms overnight into a giant cockroach; in The Trial, Josef K. is charged with an undefined crime by a maddeningly inaccessible court. In story after story, Kafka showed his...
Tags: Google, Art, Facebook, UK, Yahoo, College, Los Angeles, Chicago, Literature, Kafka, Vladimir Nabokov, Facebook Twitter, Hollywood Reporter, Hartigan, Franz Kafka, William Faulkner


Best TV shows set in every state

Forget the airplane , the automobile, and the iPhone. The greatest American invention in history is hands down the television. Not only has it given us a way to see the world without leaving our living room, but it was also an electronic babysitter long before the tablet and gave families something to do at dinner other than talk to each other. Over the 70-plus years TV has been around we’ve seen thousands of shows, set all kinds of places around our great land. We took a look through TV histo...
Tags: Travel, Utah, Florida, Hbo, New York, Hollywood, Texas, Minnesota, Nbc, Mississippi, Maryland, Minneapolis, Colorado, Abc, South Park, California


Storytelling Structures

Is there a way to tell a good story? I written about storytelling elements 1 before, but how about the over-arching structure of a good story? Well, it turns out that there are quite a few different takes on the subject. Ways to Structure a Story 1,462 Stories — or just One? Many intellectuals have been trying to figure out if there’s any typical underlying structures of a good story. However, it would be a stretch to say that many of them have arrived at the same conclusion. ...
Tags: Creative, Pr, Storytelling, Aristotle, Jorge Luis Borges, William Faulkner, Rob Potter, Arthur Quiller Couch, Character Arc, Pinch Point, Plot Point, Storytelling Element, George Polti, William Wallace Cook, Joseph Cambell


Lincoln’s Poem About Working Terriers

Abraham Lincoln had the first Presidential dog ever photographed -- a dog named "Fido" -- and he is surely the first President to have ever written a poem about a hunting terrier.Before there were pedigree terriers in America there were cross-bred feists (sometimes spelled "fice" or "fyce") -- small, scrappy dogs with a terrier genetic base. These dogs were used for everything from ratting to fox hunting, and even bear hunting.The first know written use of the term feist (written "foist") is fou...
Tags: Pets, America, Lincoln, Bear, Feist, George Washington, Nick Carter, Hill, Abraham Lincoln, Teddy Roosevelt, Abraham Lincolna, Brim, Bruin, William Faulkner, PBurns, Terrierman


Lincoln's Wrote a Poem About Working Terriers

Abraham Lincoln had the first Presidential dog ever photographed -- a dog named "Fido" -- and he is surely the first President to have ever written a poem about a hunting terrier.Before there were pedigree terriers in America there were cross-bred feists (sometimes spelled "fice" or "fyce") -- small, scrappy dogs with a terrier genetic base. These dogs were used for everything from ratting to fox hunting, and even bear hunting.The first know written use of the term feist (written "foist") is fou...
Tags: Pets, America, Lincoln, Bear, Feist, George Washington, Nick Carter, Hill, Abraham Lincoln, Teddy Roosevelt, Abraham Lincolna, Brim, Bruin, William Faulkner, PBurns, Terrierman


‘Them That Follow’ Review: A Slow-Burn Appalachian Gothic Tale That Descends into Body Horror Territory [Sundance]

“Behold, I give unto you power to tread on serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy: and nothing shall by any means hurt you.” This line from the book of Luke helped give birth to the religious rite of snake handling in Appalachia. As is the case with often questionable religious practices, the worshippers following this tradition have taken things literally, pulling hissing, venomous snakes from crates and practically daring the creatures to bite them. If they are truly one ...
Tags: Movies, Drama, Features, Movie Reviews, Olivia Colman, Connor, Madison, Jim Gaffigan, Sundance, Luke, APPALACHIA, Mara, Poulton, Englert, Augie, William Faulkner


10 must-read classic books for beginners

Classical literature constitutes a notable piece of work that has enduring quality over the years.The ranks of classics encompasses a small number of works over many languages. These works are accessible and timeless.Classic literature isn't usually on a leisure reader's list. Classics tend to evoke views of dusty tomes, unapproachable texts or mere ornaments in some ersatz library. Mention to someone that you're reading Moby Dick, Brave New World, or some other renowned classic and you're sure...
Tags: Books, History, George Orwell, Innovation, Classics, Literature, Jane Austen, Harper Lee, Rochester, Mark Twain, Colin Firth, Dick, Personal Growth, Herman Melville, Ernest Hemingway, Don


10 approachable must-read classics

Classical literature constitutes a notable piece of work that has enduring quality over the years.The ranks of classics encompasses a small number of works over many languages. These works are accessible and timeless.Classic literature isn't usually on a leisure reader's list. Classics tend to evoke views of dusty tomes, unapproachable texts or mere ornaments in some ersatz library. Mention to someone that you're reading Moby Dick, Brave New World, or some other renowned classic and you're sure...
Tags: Books, History, George Orwell, Innovation, Classics, Literature, Jane Austen, Harper Lee, Rochester, Mark Twain, Colin Firth, Dick, Personal Growth, Herman Melville, Ernest Hemingway, Don


The unexpected first jobs of famous scientists

First jobs can have often contradictory expectations and feel like an odd fit for your talents.If you feel that way, you're not alone: Isaac Newton once worked as a farmer.One tip for your first job: be an observer of people and your environment. None The great American writer William Faulkner used to work in a post office. Whoopi Goldberg was a morgue beautician. Colin Powell — former Secretary of State and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff — worked in a baby furniture store. This holds tru...
Tags: Work, Identity, History, Physics, New York Times, Innovation, Reddit, Isaac Newton, Albert Einstein, Whoopi Goldberg, Harvard Business Review, Warsaw, State, Joint Chiefs of Staff, Gregor Mendel, Isaac


"The president of the United States has many faults, but let’s not ignore this one: He cannot write sentences."

"If a tree falls in a forrest and no one is there to hear it … wait: Pretty much all of you noticed that mistake, right? Yet Wednesday morning, the president did not; he released a tweet referring to 'forrest fires' twice, as if these fires were set by Mr. Gump. Trump’s serial misuse of public language is one of many shortcomings that betray his lack of fitness for the presidency. Trump’s writing suggests not just inadequate manners or polish—not all of us need be dainty—but inadequate thought. ...
Tags: Comics, Supreme Court, Law, White House, United States, Jane Austen, Random House, Hemingway, Spelling, Wilson, Trump, John Keats, John Irving, Ernest Hemingway, Scott Fitzgerald, Andrew Jackson


The Books That Samuel Beckett Read and Really Liked (1941-1956)

Samuel Beckett, Pic, 1" by Roger Pic. Via Wikimedia Commons Clad in a black turtleneck and with a shock of white hair, Samuel Beckett was a gaunt, gloomy high priest of modernism. After the 1955 premiere of Samuel Beckett’s play Waiting for Godot (watch him stage a performance here), Kenneth Tynan quipped, ''It has no plot, no climax, no denouement; no beginning, no middle and no end.'' From there, Beckett’s work only got more austere, bleak and despairing. His 1969 play Breath, for instance,...
Tags: Google, Books, Yahoo, College, Los Angeles, Literature, Around The World, Albert Camus, Samuel Beckett, Agatha Christie, Christie, Facebook Twitter, Beckett, Hollywood Reporter, Theodor Fontane, Suzanne


Blame authors' fortunes on monopolism, not university professors, booksellers and librarians

The New York Times weighs in on an Authors Guild survey that shows a "drastic 42% decline in authors' earnings over the past decade. John Scalzi offers some important perspective. Here's the summary: * Authors Guild: authors' incomes are way down, thanks to Amazon's monopolism, which is crushing indies and traditionally published authors alike; universities are relying on fair use and Google Books for coursepacks, and big tech overall is "devalu[ing] what we produce to lower their costs fo...
Tags: Google, Amazon, Facebook, Post, Copyfight, News, Writing, US, America, New York Times, Nea, Hemingway, Simon, Ernest Hemingway, AG, Authors Guild


Killing Your Darlings: How Playwrights Decide When To Cut Passages They Love

“As novelist William Faulkner said about writing, but is applicable to all creative endeavours: ‘You must kill all your darlings.’ That said, killing your darlings can be really painful because you love them so dearly.” Lyn Gardner talks to theatre folk who’ve had to do it about why and how. (One groused, “I wonder if auteur directors are asked to kill their darlings. Does anyone ever say to Ivo van Hove: ‘Could you just cut 10 minutes?'”) — The Stage
Tags: Art, Theatre, Ivo van Hove, Lyn Gardner, William Faulkner, 12.05.18


Opinion: Civil War ghosts haunt the Mississippi runoff vote

Every Southerner knows the truth of William Faulkner's words: "The past is never dead. It's not even past."
Tags: News, Mississippi, Stories, William Faulkner


An Atlas of Literary Maps Created by Great Authors: J.R.R Tolkien’s Middle Earth, Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island & More

Plot, setting, character… we learn to think of these as discrete elements in literary writing, comparable to the strategy, board, and pieces of a chess game. But what if this scheme doesn’t quite work? What about when the setting is a character? There are many literary works named and well-known for the unforgettable places they introduce: Walden, Wuthering Heights, Howards End…. There are invented domains that seem more real to readers than reality: Faulkner’s Yoknapatowpha, Thomas Hardy’s Wes...
Tags: Google, Books, Maps, College, Literature, Jack Kerouac, David Mitchell, Philip Pullman, Robert Louis Stevenson, Tolkien, Lewis, Robinson, Facebook Twitter, Wessex, Josh Jones, FAULKNER


When William Faulkner Ran A Post Office (It Was A Disaster)

From 1921 to 1924, he was postmaster at the Post Office branch for Ole Miss in Oxford. “Faulkner would open and close the office whenever he felt like it, he would read other people’s magazines, he would throw out any mail he thought unimportant, he would play cards with his friends or write in the back while patrons waited out front.”
Tags: Art, Post Office, People, William Faulkner, 09.25.18, Ole Miss in Oxford Faulkner


Thought for the day, Sept. 25, 2018

William Faulkner, 1954. (Carl Van Vechten Photographs collection at the Library of Congress’ Prints and Photographs division) William Faulker, American novelist and short story writer “The aim of every artist is to arrest motion, which is life, by artificial means and hold it fixed so that a hundred years later, when a stranger looks at it, it moves again since it is life. Since man is mortal, the only immortality possible for him is to leave something behind him that is immortal since it...
Tags: Sport, Soccer, Paris, Local News, San Fernando Valley, Kilroy, William Faulkner, Thought For The Day, Carl Van Vechten, Congress Prints and Photographs, William Faulker


The IM Saturday Monks Brunch: Sept. 1, 2018 — Labor Day Edition

September Fields (2014) The IM Saturday Monks Brunch: Sept. 1, 2018 — Labor Day Edition By all these lovely tokens September days are here, with summer’s best of weather and autumn’s best of cheer. • Helen Hunt Jackson For Labor Day — Some less than sanguine quotes about work… Hard work never killed anybody, but why take a chance? (Edgar Bergen) Work is a necessary evil to be avoided. (Mark Twain) My father taught me to work; he did not teach me to love it. (Abraham Lincoln) A...
Tags: Massachusetts, Religion, America, United States, Missouri, Ford, Mark Twain, Donald Trump, Christ, Michael, Aristotle, Phoenix, U S Senate, Capitol, Luke, McCain


‘Outlaw King’ Starring Chris Pine to Open TIFF 2018, ‘Jeremiah Terminator LeRoy’ Starring Laura Dern and Kristen Stewart to Close

The opening and closing night films at TIFF have been announced. David Mackenzie’s Outlaw King, starring Chris Pine, will open the fest, while Justin Kelly, Jeremiah Terminator LeRoy, starring Laura Dern and Kristen Stewart, will close. More info on these titles, and what else to look forward to at TIFF below. The TIFF titles keep on coming. Today, the festival announced the big opening and closing night films. Outlaw King reunites the Hell or High Water team of Chris Pine and David Mackenzi...
Tags: South Korea, Japan, Usa, England, Hollywood, Movies, Wales, France, Scotland, India, Toronto, Nasa, Canada, Ireland, United Kingdom, Burning


First TIFF 2018 Titles Announced: Here’s What You Should Be Excited About

The Toronto International Film Festival has announced its first wave of titles for the 2018 festival. The Gala and Special Presentation titles offer an incredibly exciting line-up, including new films from Claire Denis, Steve McQueen, Alfonso Cuarón, Barry Jenkins, Damien Chazelle, Bradley Cooper, Jason Reitman and many more. See the lineup below. I’ll be on the ground at TIFF this year representing /Film (watch for my reviews!), and I couldn’t be more thrilled. The lineup this year is truly...
Tags: South Korea, Japan, Usa, Movies, France, India, Toronto, Nasa, Canada, Ireland, United Kingdom, Burning, Robert Pattinson, Bradley Cooper, Village Voice, Philip Seymour Hoffman


The 10 coolest bookstores in the US

Even with the convenience of downloading eBooks, many of us still prefer flipping paper pages and seeing the progress of a bookmark working its way from beginning to end to staring at a glowing iPad. The printed word isn’t dead, and if you’re one who prefers hard copies of your favorite books, here are the coolest locations in the US to find them. 1. Powell’s City of Books, Portland Photo: ARTYOORAN/Shutterstock Powell’s touts itself as The World’s Largest Independent Bookstore, and it ce...
Tags: Travel, Amazon, Books, Texas, La, US, San Francisco, World, Chicago, United States, Northampton, Portland, Manhattan, Seattle, New England, Frank Lloyd Wright


Joseph Heller’s Handwritten Outline for Catch-22, One of the Great Novels of the 20th Century

We remember Catch-22, more than half a century after its publication, as a rollicking satire of American military culture in wartime. But those of us who return to Joseph Heller's debut novel, a cult favorite turned bestseller turned pillar of the modern canon, find a much more complex piece of work. Heller began writing the manuscript in 1953, while still employed as a copywriter at a small advertising agency. The project grew in ambition over the next eight years he spent working on it, event...
Tags: Google, Books, Snowden, College, Harvard, Literature, Joseph Heller, Seoul, Evelyn Waugh, J K Rowling, Facebook Twitter, Milo, Orr, Cathcart, Heller, William Faulkner


The Mother of All Maps of the “Father of Waters”: Behold the 11-Foot Traveler’s Map of the Mississippi River (1866)

Image courtesy of the David Rumsey Map Center Everybody knows a fact or two about the United States of America, even those who've never set foot there. At the very least, they know the US is a big country, but it's one thing to know that and another to truly understand the scale involved. Today we offer you an artifact from cartographic history that illustrates it vividly: a 19th-century traveler's map of the Mississippi River that, in order to display the length of that mighty 2,320-mile water...
Tags: Google, Maps, Mississippi, Congress, College, US, America, History, St Louis, Seoul, Gulf of Mexico, Mississippi River, United States of America, Atlas Obscura, Facebook Twitter, Sidney


Philip Roth (RIP) Creates a List of the 15 Books That Influenced Him Most

Image by Thierry Ehrmann, via Flickr Commons We stand at a pivotal time in history, and not only when it comes to presidential politics and other tragedies. The boomer artists and writers who loomed over the last several decades—whose influence, teaching, or patronage determined the careers of hundreds of successors—are passing away. It seems that not a week goes by that we don’t mourn the loss of one or another towering figure in the arts and letters. And along with the eulogies and tributes c...
Tags: Google, Books, College, Wikipedia, New York Times, Literature, Philip Roth, Gustave Flaubert, Paul Auster, Albert Camus, Leo Tolstoy, Colette, Trump, Ernest Hemingway, Facebook Twitter, Roth


Burning review – male rage blazes a chilling trail on the Korean border

Sex, envy and pyromania make for a riveting mystery in Lee Chang-dong’s masterfully crafted Murakami adaptationLee Chang-dong’s Burning is a superbly shot and sensuously scored movie, a mystery thriller about obsessive love taken from a short story by Haruki Murakami but with something of Patricia Highsmith or maybe the kind of Ruth Rendell novel that Claude Chabrol might have filmed. It’s a psychological drama set in the modern consumerist Korea of the callous Gangnam-style rich and poor young ...
Tags: South Korea, Patricia Highsmith, Film, World news, Culture, Asia Pacific, Film adaptations, Festivals, Korea, Cannes film festival, Haruki Murakami, Ruth Rendell, Scott Fitzgerald, Panmunjom, Paju, William Faulkner


Marking Mississippi’s Literary Trail, From William Faulkner to Jesmyn Ward

Soon travelers in the Magnolia State will be able to visit places where authors like Faulkner, Ward, Eudora Welty and Richard Ford lived and wrote.
Tags: News, Mississippi, Ford, William, Richard Ford, Richard, Ward, Jesmyn Ward, Magnolia State, FAULKNER, National Endowment for the Humanities, William Faulkner, Eudora, Welty, Writing and Writers, Jesmyn