Posts filtered by tags: Yale School of Medicine[x]


 

2 charts show how Omicron symptoms differ from Delta and past coronavirus variants

Girl takes test after getting COVID-19 symptoms on January 4.Brittany Murray/MediaNews Group/Long Beach Press-Telegram/Getty Images Sore throats and runny noses are increasingly common in vaccinated people with Omicron. But Omicron patients report fewer instances of fever, cough, and loss of taste or smell. The charts below show which Omicron symptoms are most common, and how they compare to prior variants. Almost as soon as Omicron started spreading, doctors noticed slight differences in the...
Tags: Hong Kong, UK, Science, News, San Francisco, Trends, Connecticut, Delta, Symptoms, Oakland California, Moreno, Yale School of Medicine, Juan Perez, Brandenburg Germany, Jorge Moreno, Carlos Ramirez


Omicron infections often start with a scratchy throat, doctors say — evidence of the changing nature of COVID-19 symptoms

Dr. Carlos Ramirez conducts an examination on Juan Perez, 50, in Oakland, California, on May 12, 2020.Jessica Christian/The San Francisco Chronicle/Getty Images Sore throat appears to be a common, early symptom of an Omicron infection. Patients in South Africa, the UK, and the US reported scratchy throats prior to other symptoms. Omicron could infect the throat before the nose, unlike other variants, some experts say. At the end of December, Dr. Jorge Moreno and his colleagues were monitoring...
Tags: UK, Science, London, News, US, San Francisco, Trends, South Africa, Connecticut, Delta, Norway, Symptoms, University College London, Oakland California, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Moreno


Women's Periods May Be Late After Coronavirus Vaccination, Study Suggests

An anonymous reader quotes a report from The New York Times: Shortly after coronavirus vaccines were rolled out about a year ago, women started reporting erratic menstrual cycles after receiving the shots. Some said their periods were late. Others reported heavier bleeding than usual or painful bleeding. Some postmenopausal women who hadn't had a period in years even said they had menstruated again. A study published on Thursday found that women's menstrual cycles did indeed change following vac...
Tags: Tech, The New York Times, Taylor, Yale School of Medicine, Hugh Taylor


When should you take a COVID-19 rapid test if you only have one? Experts suggest waiting for symptoms or hours before your next party.

Aaron Salvador swabs his nose with a COVID-19 rapid antigen test kit in Washington, DC, on December 29, 2021.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc/Getty Images The best time to take a rapid test is right before you see vulnerable people or a large group. Some disease experts also recommend waiting until you develop symptoms when testing is scare. If you're symptom-free, but had a recent exposure, you can wait 3-5 days for a test, experts said. COVID-19 rapid tests are flying off the shelves at p...
Tags: Science, London, News, US, Trends, Washington Dc, Delta, Norway, Symptoms, Biden, Exposure, Abbott, Campbell, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, King s College, Yale School of Medicine


When should you take a COVID-19 rapid test if you only have one? Experts suggest waiting for symptoms or your next big party.

Aaron Salvador swabs his nose with a COVID-19 rapid antigen test kit in Washington, DC, on December 29, 2021.Tom Williams/CQ-Roll Call, Inc/Getty Images The best time to take a rapid test is right before you see vulnerable people or a large group. Some disease experts also recommend waiting until you develop symptoms when testing is scare. If you're symptom-free, but had a recent exposure, you can wait 3-5 days for a test, experts said. COVID-19 rapid tests are flying off the shelves at p...
Tags: Science, London, News, US, Trends, Washington Dc, Delta, Norway, Symptoms, Biden, Exposure, Abbott, Campbell, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, King s College, Yale School of Medicine


'Swab your throat first and then your nose': 4 disease experts offer new guidance on COVID-19 rapid tests

A woman uses a swab to take a sample from her mouth at a NHS Test and Trace COVID-19 testing unit in west London on May 25 2021.ADRIAN DENNIS/AFP/Getty Images New research suggests Omicron may be easier to detect in saliva than nasal samples. Some experts recommend swabbing your throat then your nose for a COVID-19 rapid test, even if the test doesn't say to. The FDA and testing manufacturers advise against performing throat swabs at home. The FDA has authorized just one method of taking ...
Tags: UK, Science, London, News, US, Trends, European Union, Public Health, Moscow, Fda, University Of Southern California, University College London, Abbott, Petersen, Campbell, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health


Study identifies the role of early developmental gene in intracranial aneurysms

Mutations of a gene that regulates formation of blood vessels in the brain of vertebrates can lead to potentially deadly aneurysms in adults, Yale School of Medicine researchers report in the December issue of Nature Medicine.
Tags: Health, Yale School of Medicine


Newly discovered RNA molecule protects mice from emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants

Researchers at Yale School of Medicine have discovered that an RNA molecule that stimulates the body's early antiviral defense system can protect mice from a range of emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants.
Tags: Health, Yale School of Medicine


Yale Expert Picked as Next Connecticut Public Health Chief

Dr. Manisha Juthani, an infectious diseases specialist at Yale School of Medicine, was nominated by Connecticut’s governor on Monday to serve as the next commissioner of the Department of Public Health.
Tags: Connecticut, Yale School of Medicine, Manisha Juthani


Brain functional connectivity in Tourette syndrome

Tourette syndrome, a neurodevelopmental disorder, causes motor and phonic "tics," or uncontrollable repeated behaviors and vocalizations. People affected by Tourette syndrome can often suppress these tics for some time before the urges become overwhelming, and researchers have long wondered at the neural underpinnings of the suppression effort. In a new study, researchers at Yale School of Medicine have assessed the impact of tic suppression on functional connectivity between brain regions.
Tags: Science, Yale School of Medicine


Can a prior rhinovirus infection protect against COVID-19?

Researchers at the Yale School of Medicine found that rhinovirus accelerates interferon-stimulated genes.
Tags: Health, Yale School of Medicine


Pediatric cardiologists explain myocarditis and why your teen should still get a Covid-19 vaccine

By Elizabeth Cohen | CNN Senior Medical Correspondent The news about a potential link between the Covid-19 vaccine and a cardiac ailment in young people may be striking fear in the hearts of some parents. But pediatric cardiologists have a message for these parents: Covid-19 should scare you more — a whole lot more — than the vaccine. And these doctors should know. They’ve treated young patients who’ve contracted this heart ailment after vaccination — it’s called myocarditis, or inflammation of...
Tags: News, Cdc, US, California News, Sport, Cnn, Chicago, Soccer, Yale, Hall, Berger, Elizabeth Cohen, Yale School of Medicine, American Heart Association, American Academy of Pediatrics, Kevin Hall


The Fitbit Sense is an excellent smartwatch and fitness tracker, but the cheaper Versa 3 is still the best choice

If you buy through our links, we may earn money from affiliate partners. Learn more. Sarah Lord/Insider The Fitbit Sense packs most of the latest technology into a fairly-priced $299.95 smartwatch. Unlike some of its competitors, The Sense has an EDA and skin temperature sensor to track stress. The Versa 3 offers a similar experience to the Sense, but is $70 cheaper. Check out our guide to the best smartwatches for more buying advice. Table of Contents: Masthead Sticky Updated on 04...
Tags: Reviews, Apple, Google, Spotify, Fitness, Samsung, Trends, Pandora, New York Times, Stress Management, Fitbit, Garmin, Sarah, Cornell Tech, EDA, Yale School of Medicine


The Fitbit Sense is an excellent smartwatch and fitness tracker, but the cheaper Versa 3 is still the best choice for most people

If you buy through our links, we may earn money from affiliate partners. Learn more. Sarah Lord/Insider The $299.95 Fitbit Sense is Fibit's flagship smartwatch and is filled with the latest technology. The Sense has an EDA sensor to track stress and an SpO2 sensor for blood oxygen measurements. The Sense is a solid watch, but the Versa 3 is cheaper and almost identical. Check out our guide to the best smartwatches for more buying advice. Table of Contents: Masthead Sticky Sense (s...
Tags: Reviews, Apple, Google, Spotify, Fitness, Samsung, Trends, Pandora, New York Times, Stress Management, Fitbit, Garmin, Sarah, Cornell Tech, EDA, Yale School of Medicine


Immunotherapy drug delays onset of Type 1 diabetes in at-risk group

More than five years after receiving an experimental immunotherapy drug, half of a group of people at high risk of developing Type 1 diabetes remained disease-free compared with 22% of those who received a placebo, according to a new trial overseen by Yale School of Medicine researchers.
Tags: Science, Yale School of Medicine


Anti-vaxxers are using a doctor's miscarriage to claim the COVID-19 vaccine affects pregnancy - but the doctor lost her baby before getting the shot

Getty A Facebook post allegedly claimed the coronavirus vaccine caused an OB-GYN's miscarriage.  But the doctor suffered the loss before receiving the vaccine, according to her Instagram posts. Based on how it's made and data so far, scientists say it's likely the vaccine is safe in pregnancy. Visit the Business section of Insider for more stories. When Dr. Michelle Rockwell woke up Sunday morning, just a couple months after suffering a pregnancy loss, she said she saw her photos plaster...
Tags: Facebook, Usa, Science, Parenting, Cdc, Miscarriage, Pregnancy, Trends, World Health Organization, Getty, Women's Health, Reproductive Health, Anthony Fauci, Centers For Disease Control And Prevention, Shepherd, Tulsa


Researchers say a new coronavirus variant found in California may have contributed to Los Angeles' case surge

Nurse Michelle Goldson in the ICU at Martin Luther King Jr. Community Hospital in Los Angeles, California on December 17, 2020. Francine Orr/Los Angeles Times via Getty Images More than 1 million people in LA county have gotten COVID-19. Two-thirds of those cases were reported in the last two months. According to a recent study, LA's coronavirus surge coincides with the emergence of a new variant called CAL.20C. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. More than 1 million people...
Tags: Health, UK, Science, News, California, La, US, Los Angeles, Trends, South Africa, Anthony Fauci, Pacific Ocean, Eric Garcetti, Gavin Newsom, Southern California, Los Angeles County


More than a year after the first COVID-19 case was discovered, more than 2 million people have died from the highly transmissible virus

Health workers in personal protective suits ferry the body of a man who died of COVID-19 on a handcart for cremation in New Delhi, India, May 28, 2020. AP Photo/Manish Swarup More than 2 million people worldwide have died from COVID-19 as of Friday.  The world hit one million COVID-19 deaths just three months ago.  The death toll is the equivalent to the entire country of Slovenia. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. More than a year after the first novel coronavirus case w...
Tags: UK, England, Science, US, Trends, South Africa, Slovenia, Nebraska, New Mexico, Bahrain, New Delhi India, Yale School of Medicine, Johns Hopkins University, Aylin Woodward, Coronavirus, COVID


Study shows how neurons can become a target of SARS-CoV-2 infection

Using both mouse and human brain tissue, researchers at Yale School of Medicine have discovered that SARS-CoV-2 can directly infect the central nervous system and have begun to unravel some of the virus's effects on brain cells.
Tags: Health, Yale School of Medicine


SARS-CoV-2 can infect neurons and damage brain tissue, study indicates

Using both mouse and human brain tissue, researchers at Yale School of Medicine have discovered that SARS-CoV-2 can directly infect the central nervous system and have begun to unravel some of the virus's effects on brain cells. The study, published today in the Journal of Experimental Medicine (JEM), may help researchers develop treatments for the various neurological symptoms associated with COVID-19.
Tags: Science, Yale School of Medicine


When the coronavirus runs rampant, mutations and new strains are more likely. That may be what happened in the UK.

A woman stands a crosswalk in London, England, on October 15, 2020. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images A new, more transmissible coronavirus strain first detected in the UK is spreading worldwide. All viruses change over time. The more people a virus infects, the more chances it has to mutate into a new variant. So countries in which the coronavirus is spreading more widely are more likely to see problems like this, experts say. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. The surest way to b...
Tags: UK, England, Texas, London, Cdc, France, China, US, Trends, South Africa, World Health Organization, Boris Johnson, London Underground, Heathrow Airport, London England, Yale School of Medicine


What it actually means that a new coronavirus strain is more transmissible - and how that changes your chances of getting sick

Masked travelers on a London Underground platform, September 24, 2020. Getty A new, more transmissible coronavirus strain first detected in the UK has spread worldwide. The variant jumps from person to person more easily, so if you're exposed, your chances of infection are higher. Strict masking and social distancing are still the best means of protection against the variant. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. A new, more transmissible strain of coronavirus that was first ...
Tags: Health, UK, New York, Science, London, News, California, New York City, US, San Francisco, Trends, Getty Images, World Health Organization, Getty, London Underground, Mutations


The contagious coronavirus variant identified in the UK has probably been circulating in the US for many weeks: 'It's very likely that it's in every state'

Travelers at Miami International Airport on December 24. DANIEL SLIM/AFP via Getty Images California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, and New York all confirmed cases of a new, more transmissible coronavirus variant this week. None of the infected people recently traveled outside the US, suggesting the variant is already spreading in multiple communities. One expert said the virus was likely in the US by early December — weeks before the first case was detected. Visit Business Insider's homepa...
Tags: Health, UK, England, New York, Science, London, News, Colorado, California, Cdc, China, US, Los Angeles, Trends, Georgia, Genetics


The contagious coronavirus variant identified in the UK has probably been circulating in the US for many weeks: 'It's very likely it's in every state'

Travelers wear masks at Miami International Airport on December 24, 2020. DANIEL SLIM/AFP via Getty Images California, Colorado, Florida, Georgia, and New York all confirmed cases of a new, more transmissible coronavirus variant this week. None of the infected people recently traveled outside the US, suggesting the variant is already spreading in multiple communities. One expert said the virus was likely in the US by early December — weeks before the first case was detected. Visit Business...
Tags: Health, UK, England, New York, Science, London, News, Colorado, California, Cdc, France, China, US, Los Angeles, Trends, Georgia


The contagious coronavirus variant first identified in the UK has probably been circulating in the US for many weeks: 'It's very likely it's in every state'

Travelers wear masks at Miami International Airport on December 24, 2020. DANIEL SLIM/AFP via Getty Images Colorado, California, Florida, and New York confirmed cases of a new, more transmissible coronavirus variant this week. None of the infected people recently traveled outside the US, suggesting the variant is already spreading in multiple communities. One expert said the virus was likely in the US by early December — weeks before the first case was detected. Visit Business Insider's ho...
Tags: Health, UK, England, New York, Science, London, News, Colorado, California, Cdc, France, China, US, Los Angeles, Trends, Genetics


The contagious UK coronavirus variant has probably been circulating in the US for many weeks: 'It's very likely it's in every state'

Travelers wear masks at Miami International Airport on December 24, 2020. DANIEL SLIM/AFP via Getty Images Colorado, California, Florida, and New York confirmed cases of a new, more transmissible coronavirus variant this week. None of the infected people recently traveled outside the US, suggesting the variant is already spreading in multiple communities. One expert said the virus was likely in the US by early December — weeks before the first case was detected. Visit Business Insider's ho...
Tags: Health, UK, England, New York, Science, London, News, Colorado, California, Cdc, France, China, US, Los Angeles, Trends, Genetics


The US has confirmed its first case of the new, more transmissible coronavirus strain in Colorado

Healthcare workers from the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment check in with people waiting to be tested for COVID-19 at a drive-up testing center in Denver on March 12, 2020. Michael Ciaglo/Getty Images Colorado officials confirmed the first US case of a new coronavirus variant that was first identified in the UK. The strain may be more transmissible than its predecessors, but there's no reason to think it's more deadly. Public-health experts say the emergence of the ne...
Tags: UK, England, Science, London, News, Colorado, US, Trends, United Kingdom, Mutations, Anthony Fauci, Denver, Yale School of Medicine, PBS NewsHour, Polis, Jared Polis


When the coronavirus runs rampant, mutations and new strains are more likely, experts say. That may be what happened in the UK.

A woman stands a crosswalk in London, England, on October 15, 2020. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images A new coronavirus strain that seems to be more infectious is spreading in the UK. All viruses change over time. The more people a virus infects, the more chances it has to mutate into a new variant. So countries that let the coronavirus spread widely are more likely to see problems like this, experts say. Genetic data suggest the UK strain is already in other European countries. Visit Business Insi...
Tags: Europe, UK, England, London, Wales, Cdc, France, Scotland, China, Singapore, US, Trends, South Africa, Netherlands, World Health Organization, Boris Johnson


No, the coronavirus vaccine won't make you infertile

Dr. Marina Del Rios, from University of Illinois Hospital & Health Sciences System, receives Chicago's first COVID-19 vaccination from Dr. Nikhila Juvvadi on Tuesday, Dec. 15, 2020, at Loretto Hospital, a 122-bed medical facility in the Austin neighborhood of Chicago. Jose M. Osorio/Chicago Tribune via AP A now-blocked Facebook post that went viral claimed the coronavirus vaccine could cause infertility. It suggested incorrectly that the vaccine teaches the body to attack a protein inv...
Tags: Facebook, Usa, Science, Cdc, Pregnancy, Trends, Ap, Chicago, Austin, Fertility, Food And Drug Administration, Pfizer, Vaccine, Women's Health, Reproductive Health, Conspiracy Theories


1 In 5 Inmates In US Has Had COVID, 1,700 Have Died

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — One in every five state and federal prisoners in the United States has tested positive for the coronavirus, a rate more than four times as high as the general population. In some states, more than half of prisoners have been infected, according to data collected by The Associated Press and The Marshall Project. As the pandemic enters its 10th month — and as the first Americans begin to receive a long-awaited COVID-19 vaccine — at least 275,000 prisoners have been infecte...
Tags: New York, News, Colorado, Loretta Lynch, California, US, Sacramento, Ap, Pennsylvania, United States, North Dakota, Arkansas, South Dakota, New Jersey, Turlock, Roseville